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Article

Peter Andreas Kjeldsberg

revised by Martin Anderson

(b Fredrikstad, April 29, 1872; d Oslo, Dec 24, 1932). Norwegian composer, conductor and organist. He studied with Peter Lindeman (organ) and Iver Holter (harmony, counterpoint and composition) at the Christiania Music and Organ School (1888–92), and was then a pupil of Reinecke (composition) and Ruthard (piano) at the Leipzig Conservatory (1892–4). Appointments as organist followed in Drammen (1895–1907) and Oslo (1907–32), where he served at the cathedral from 1916; his First Symphony was completed during a course of study in Berlin in 1897. He was one of those responsible for the foundation of the Norsk Komponistforening, of which he was president from 1921 to 1923. As a member of the Koralbokkomiteen (1922–6) he harmonized most of the melodies in the chorale book of the Norwegian Church, and he edited preludes to all of the chorales. He was active as a choir-conductor, leading the Håndverksangforening (...

Article

Roxanne R. Reed

(b Anguilla, MS, March 21, 1919; d Hazel Crest, IL, 15 June, 1995). American gospel director, singer, composer, and publisher. Anderson established a career forming and training gospel groups in Chicago. His formative years were spent as one of the original Roberta Martin Singers, one of the premiere gospel groups of the 1930s and 1940s. He left briefly, between 1939 and 1941, to form the first of his many ensembles, the Knowles and Anderson Singers with R.L. Knowles. He rejoined Martin, but ultimately resigned because of the travel demands. In 1947 he formed Robert Anderson and his Gospel Caravan, but after several members left in 1952, he formed a new set of singers that recorded and performed under the name the Robert Anderson Singers through the mid-1950s. Throughout his career, Anderson recorded on a multitude of labels including Miracle and United with Robert Anderson and the Caravans; and later with the Robert Anderson Singers, on Apollo. Anderson wrote, and often sang lead on, many of the songs his groups performed, including “Why Should I Worry” (...

Article

Michael Fend

(Carlo Zanobi Salvadore Maria )

(b Florence, 8/Sept 14, 1760; d Paris, March 15, 1842). Italian, composer, conductor, teacher, administrator, theorist, and music publisher, active in France. He took French citizenship, probably in 1794, and was a dominant figure in Parisian musical life for half a century. He was a successful opera composer during the Revolutionary period, and had comparable success with religious music from the beginning of the Restoration. He was made director of the Paris Conservatoire and consolidated its pre-eminent position in music education in Europe.

In the biographical preface to his work catalogue, compiled in 1831, Cherubini gave 8 and 14 September as his dates of birth, but the records of the baptistery of S Giovanni state that he was born on 14 September (and baptized the following day). He was the tenth of 12 children. It has been claimed that his mother died when he was four years old (Pougin, ...

Article

Gaynor G. Jones and Michael Musgrave

(b Wetzlar, Jan 6, 1807; d Berlin, Nov 25, 1883). German editor of folksongs, teacher, choral director and composer. He received his first musical training from his father, Adam Wilhelm Erk, who was Kantor, cathedral organist and teacher at Wetzlar. In 1813 the family moved to Dreieichenhain in Hesse-Darmstadt where Erk took piano, organ and violin lessons. After his father’s death in 1820, he went to Offenbach, where he entered J.B. Spiess’s educational institute (at which he taught from 1824). His music teachers at Offenbach were the composer Johann Anton André, the violinist C. Reinwald and the organist J.C.H. Rinck. In 1826 he was offered a temporary appointment at the teachers’ seminary at Moers on the lower Rhine; he founded and directed many music festivals in this area (including the Remscheid, Ruhrort and Duisburg festivals), and also performed as a piano soloist and in ensembles. He accepted a teaching appointment at the Royal Seminary in Berlin in ...

Article

Darlene Graves and Michael Graves

[William J. ]

(b Alexandria, IN, March 28, 1936). American gospel songwriter, performer, producer, and publisher. He grew up on a small farm in Indiana and graduated from Anderson College with a major in English and a minor in music. He went on to receive a master’s degree in guidance and counseling and met his future wife and song-producing partner, Gloria Sickal, while both were teaching high school. Gaither started singing gospel music as a child and in 1956 formed the Bill Gaither Trio with his brother Danny and his sister Mary Ann. He started his own publishing company in 1959. He continued to perform and compose while a teacher at Alexandria High School and in 1961 formed the Gaither Music Company to publish his works. After their marriage in 1962, Gaither and his wife wrote their first major song, “He touched me,” which was a significant hit by 1963. He re-formed the Bill Gaither Trio with Gloria and Danny, and in ...

Article

James R. Hines, Barbara Turchin and Nicholas Michael Butler

(b Hesse-Kassel, Germany, c1786; d New York, NY, July 30, 1829). American theater manager, pianist, organist, composer, and music publisher of German birth. He moved to the United States at the end of the 18th century and was probably related to the musician George Gilfert who was in New York as early at 1789. In his first New York advertisement in 1800, he was described as a musician “lately from Europe.” The New York directory of 1805 lists him as a music teacher in that city, but in 1806 he migrated to Charleston, South Carolina, with a number of other theater musicians. He presented his first concert there on 3 March 1807 and quickly became a favorite member of the local music scene. In December 1809 he became the organist of St. John’s Lutheran Church, and in December 1810 he opened a music store in partnership with a fellow German musician, Philip Muck, under the name C. Gilfert and Company. This institution chiefly sold imported instruments, accessories, and music, but in early ...

Article

Samuel F. Pogue

revised by Frank Dobbins

(fl Lyons, 1550–84). French music printer, bookseller, composer and instrumentalist. In 1551 he prepared the third in a series of four books of music for guitar printed in Paris by Robert Granjon and Michel Fezandat (RISM 1551²²). In the dedication Gorlier wrote apologetically of the four-course guitar and his reasons for composing for an inferior instrument, saying that he wanted to show that it was as capable as larger instruments of reproducing music in two or three parts. Besides being an ‘excellent joueur’ on the guitar, as cited on the title-page, he evidently played the spinet; in a pamphlet (now lost) concerning Loys Bourgeois’ Droict chemin de musique (1550) Bourgeois called him ‘trougnon d’épinette’ (‘garbage of the spinet’) and complained that he had not been educated in classical languages and mathematics like the singer-composers in Lyons, Layolle Roussel and Jambe de Fer.

Gorlier was granted a privilege for printing music on ...

Article

(b New York, July 12, 1895; d Doylestown, PA, Aug 23, 1960). American lyricist, librettist, producer and publisher. Born into a notable theatrical family, his grandfather and namesake was the flamboyant opera impresario Oscar Hammerstein (1847–1919), who created and lost a handful of opera houses and companies around the turn of the century. Oscar studied law at Columbia where he became involved in the Varsity shows and, after graduation, continued to write songs. By ...

Article

Barbara Palfy

(b Kansas City, MO, Jan 12, 1884; d New York, Jan 12, 1964). American pianist, composer, music director, writer, and editor. Horst grew up in a German family that prized music and he first studied violin. After elementary school, the end of his formal education, he took up piano, honed his skills, and soon supported himself as a musician, playing ragtime and improvisations in dance and gambling halls, performing with theater pit orchestras, and accompanying solo classical recitalists.

On the West Coast in 1915, Horst encountered Ruth St. Denis and Ted Shawn, who hired him as accompanist for their Denishawn company and subsequently as music director of their new school. He remained for ten years. Immersed in the developing new abstract form of dancing, he examined the relationship of music to dance, especially through St. Denis’s “music visualizations.” He began to study musical structure and composition, and left Denishawn to continue learning in Vienna and becoming better informed in contemporary theater, art, literature, and film—knowledge he passed on to future choreographers in his book (with Caroll Russell) ...

Article

Alec Hyatt King

(William)

(b Dublin, Dec 25, 1762; d Margate, Oct 9, 1826). Irish tenor, composer, theatre manager and music publisher. The eldest of the 14 children of Thomas Kelly (Deputy Master of Ceremonies at Dublin Castle, and a wine merchant), Michael Kelly grew up amid the rich musical life of Dublin, and received singing lessons from various immigrant Italians, notably Passerini and Matteo Rauzzini. His piano teachers included Michael Arne. He made an impromptu début as the Count in Piccinni’s La buona figliuola on 17 May 1777, and went on to sing in Dibdin’s Lionel and Clarissa and Michael Arne’s Cymon, before leaving Dublin in 1779, on Rauzzini’s advice, to study in Naples.

His most influential teachers were Fenaroli and Aprile, and he enjoyed the patronage of Sir William Hamilton. He made his Italian début in Florence in May 1781, and then sang in various Italian cities including Venice where in ...

Article

Ronald D. Stetzel

[Möller, Johann Christoph]

(b Germany, 1755; d New York, Sept 21, 1803). British-American composer, organist, concert manager and music publisher of German birth. After about a decade in London, where his principal works were published (c1775–85), he moved to the USA. He was prominent in the musical life of Philadelphia (October 1790–November 1795) as organist of Zion Lutheran Church and co-manager (with Reinagle) of the City Concerts (1790–93), performing as a pianist, harpsichordist and violist. In New York he was organist of Trinity Episcopal Church and concert manager at fashionable summer pleasure gardens. Moller's and Capron's press (established in March 1793) was among the earliest in the USA for the exclusive printing of music, and Moller alone issued over 40 publications.

Article

(b north of Dundee, Angus, Nov 1600; d London, Sept 4, 1676). Scottish dancing-master, theatrical impresario, writer, publisher and possibly composer , active partly in Ireland. A man of extraordinary versatility who was adept at attracting influential patronage, he successfully survived many misfortunes. His career began as a dancer at the court of Charles I. After a fall during a court masque in 1621 he was forced to give up dancing and became a dancing master and choreographer. About 1633 he accompanied the Duke of Wentworth (later the Earl of Strafford) to Dublin. He is important in the history of music in Ireland as the first holder there of the title of Master of the Revels, a position created for him by the Earl as Lord Deputy on 28 February 1638. In this capacity he erected in Werburgh Street, close to Dublin Castle, the first theatre to be built in the British Isles outside London. On the outbreak of the Civil War in ...

Article

Norbert Carnovale and Richard Dyer

(Alexander )

(b New York, NY, Nov 22, 1925). American composer, conductor, educator, writer, publisher, and record producer. He was born into a musical family that had immigrated to America from Germany; his father played in the violin section of the New York PO for 42 years. In 1937 Schuller enrolled in the St Thomas Church Choir School in New York where his general musical education was supervised by t. tertius Noble . By the time he finished high school, he was already a horn player of professional caliber. At the age of 16 he performed in the American premiere broadcast of Shostakovich’s Symphony no.7, the “Leningrad,” conducted by Toscanini; his first book, Horn Technique (London and New York, 1962, 2/1992) has remained a standard reference.

After a season touring in the American Ballet Theatre orchestra under the direction of Antal Dorati, Schuller was appointed to the position of principal horn in the Cincinnati SO (from ...

Article

Lavern John Wagner

(b New York, May 28, 1852; d Kansas City, MO, Feb 4, 1916). American composer, publisher, and band director. As a band director in 1879, he moved from Muscatine, Iowa to Princeton, Illinois. In 1879 A.E. Squire published Southwell’s Collection of 24 Sextettes for Brass Instruments, intended to be performed in groups of three, with a brief modulation between each piece. Taking a cue from Squire, Southwell established his own music publishing firm in Princeton, printing 21 of his own compositions 1881–4. In 1884–5 his firm published in Wellington, Kansas, then temporarily in Topeka, Kansas, in 1887. The North Western Band Carnival in June 1887 prompted Southwell to move his company permanently to Kansas City. After his early serious band compositions, Southwell became aware of the vast market for town band music, and composed especially for amateur bands. During his life Southwell composed 558 works. After his death the firm was continued by his brother Charles, until sold to Volkwein Brothers in ...

Article

(b Buchau [now Bochov], nr Carlsbad [now Karlovy Vary, Czechoslovakia], c probably 1530; d Eger [now Cheb, Czechoslovakia], mid-Feb 1592). Bohemian music editor, poet, printer, bookseller and ?composer. He may have attended the Lateinschule at Eger or the one at Joachimsthal (now Jáchymov). In 1554, according to his own testimony, he was a student at Leipzig. From April 1558 for about a year he was Kantor at the Lateinschule at Eger. In 1561 he applied again for this post but was refused. Between 1559 and 1567 he seems to have travelled about a good deal – he is known to have visited Budweis (now Ceské Budějovice), whose choir he praised highly, Ossegg, Prague and Nuremberg – and he also had several private pupils. Title-pages of his prints indicate that from at least 1567 until 1569 he was again living at Eger. In 1569–70 he probably stayed for some time at Nuremberg. From ...

Article

Don Cusic

[Ragsdale, Harold Ray ]

(b Clarkdale, GA, Jan 24, 1939). American singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer, arranger, music publisher, television star, and entrepreneur. Harold Ragsdale began his musical career with a high school band that played R&B songs by the Coasters, Drifters, and other R&B groups. In 1955 the family moved to Atlanta, where publisher Bill Lowery signed him as a songwriter and secured his first recording contract with Capitol Records; Capitol’s Head of A&R, Ken Nelson changed Ragsdale’s name to Ray Stevens. After attending Georgia State University, where he studied music, Stevens had his first success with his recording of “Jeremiah Peabody’s Poly Unsaturated Quick Dissolving Fast Acting Pleasant Tasting Green and Purple Pills” (Mercury, 1961). In 1962 he moved to Nashville, supplementing his own recording career with work as a session musician, arranger, and background vocalist. He garnered a number-one pop hit and his first Grammy with his recording of “Everything is beautiful” (Barnaby, ...

Article

Barry S. Brook

(b Wehrsdorf, nr Bautzen, Feb 2, 1748; d Leipzig, Sept 12, 1806). German impresario, composer, horn player, writer on music and publisher. He attended the Gymnasium in Bautzen for seven years; in 1770 he began studying law at Leipzig University but within a year turned to music, becoming first horn player for the Grosse Concert-Gesellschaft in 1771. In 1776 he founded a music copying business and manuscript storehouse, producing a large thematic catalogue (rivalling Breitkopf’s) that he sold in manuscript. He described this catalogue (of manuscript works available for copying) and his idealistic plans for the storehouse in a series of pamphlets published between 1778 and 1781. From 1782 he sponsored a series of independent concerts in Leipzig, later producing the Gewandhaus concerts, Dilettanten concerts and Stadtmusik, and undertaking concert tours as far as Dresden, Hamburg and Prague. In addition to works by Haydn, Mozart and others, he performed a number of his own compositions. In ...

Article

Marysol Quevedo

(b Mayagüez, PR, March 9, 1952). Puerto Rican composer, concert producer, university professor, lecturer, and editor. Vázquez is one of the leading figures in electroacoustic music composition in Puerto Rico. He has also contributed to the symphonic, choral, chamber, and musical theater repertories. He studied at the University of Puerto Rico, and obtained the masters degree from the University of Pittsburgh in 1976. Vázquez has also studied composition at New York University and La Sorbonne in Paris, where he completed the doctorate. His composition professors include Rafael Aponte Ledée, Frank McCarty, and Bruce Saylor. Vázquez has been a professor and the director of the Electronic Music Lab at the University of Puerto Rico since 1978. He is also the founder of the National Association of Puerto Rican Composers. His works have been premiered and performed by diverse ensembles in Europe and America, and he has participated in several contemporary regional and international contemporary music festivals, such as the Latin American Music Festival of Caracas, and the International Electroacoustic Music Festival of Varadero, Cuba. In ...

Article

Paula Morgan

(b Patton, PA, April 2, 1927). American liturgiologist . He took two BA degrees at St Vincent College (1949 and 1952) and the MS in piano at the Juilliard School (1954), and then took further graduate courses at Columbia University. From 1957 to 1967 he was associated with St Vincent College, first as a music teacher and later in administrative positions, including those of chancellor and chairman of the board of directors. He was a member of the university seminar in medieval studies at Columbia, 1957–66. In 1967 he was appointed abbot primate of the Benedictine Confederation and in 1977 he became the Archbishop of Milwaukee. He was also music editor of the New Catholic Encyclopedia. His principal interests are medieval Latin drama and music theorists, and Ambrosian chant. He studied the compositions and theoretical writings of Hucbald, and his transcription of the Play of Daniel...