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Howard Pollack

(b Cambridge, MA, June 29, 1908; d Woodbury, CT, May 18, 1975). American composer, arranger and conductor. He studied piano and organ with his mother and Henry Gideon, and double bass with Gaston Dufresne. He also worked with Spalding (theory), Ballantine (counterpoint), Heilman (fugue), and Piston and Enescu (composition) at Harvard where, from 1930 to 1934, he pursued studies in German and Scandinavian languages. In the early 1930s he tutored at Radcliffe College (1930–32), directed the Harvard University Band (1931–5), and conducted and arranged music for dance bands. In 1936 he composed an arrangement of Harvard songs for the conductor of the Boston Pops, Arthur Fiedler, who subsequently commissioned two short pieces, Jazz Pizzicato (1938) and Jazz Legato (1939). While serving in the military (1942–6), Anderson continued writing music for Fiedler and, after World War II, he became a principal arranger for the Boston Pops in addition to providing them with a series of popular short original compositions, often with picturesque titles....

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(b Brussels, June 10, 1893; d Woluwé Saint-Lambert, Brabant, Jan 20, 1975). Belgian conductor. He studied the violin with César Thomson at the Brussels Conservatory until 1914, and composition and conducting with Weingartner at the Hochschule für Musik in Berlin. From 1920 he taught at the Brussels Conservatory, resigning his directorship of the conducting class in 1944; he conducted the orchestra there, 1940–45. In 1935 he founded the Belgian RSO, of which he was conductor until 1958. From that year he became concerned with the administration of the Queen Elisabeth of Belgium Competition. A tireless interpreter of contemporary works, André was awarded the Schoenberg Medal in 1952 for his services to 20th-century music, especially Schoenberg’s. He also gave the first performances of works by Milhaud, Koechlin, Jolivet and Sauget, among others, and was the dedicatee of Karl Amadeus Hartmann’s First Symphony. He made orchestral transcriptions of works by Rameau, Lully, Grétry, Leclair and Bach and wrote incidental music for radio plays....

Article

Peter Ross

revised by Erik Levi

(b Berne, July 5, 1879; d Zürich, June 18, 1962). Swiss conductor and composer. He spent his school years in Berne, studying the piano and composition with Karl Munzinger, and was then a pupil of Franz Wüllner in Cologne (1897–1900), where his first compositions were performed. There followed a one-year engagement as répétiteur at the Munich Hofoper, and in 1902 he settled in Zürich, where he was to dominate musical life for the next half-century. He was appointed director of the Zürich Gemischter Chor (1902), the Winterthur Stadtsängerverein (1902) and the Zürich Männerchor (1904), but his most important position was as conductor of the Tonhalle Orchestra (1906–49). In addition he directed the Zürich Conservatory (1914–41), and held classes at the university (where he received an honorary doctorate in 1914). He also served as its musical director (...

Article

Eva Öhrström

(b Visby, Feb 19, 1841; d Göteborg, Jan 11, 1929). Swedish composer, conductor and organist. She was the first woman organist and telegraphist in Sweden, the first to compose chamber and orchestral music and the first to conduct a symphony orchestra. Initially taught music by her father, in 1855 Andrée went to Stockholm and in 1857 passed her examination as the first woman organist in Sweden. In 1860 she studied composition with Ludvig Norman and in 1870 with Niels Gade in Copenhagen. She brought about the revision of a law enabling women to hold the office of organist, and in 1861 became an organist in Stockholm. In 1867 she moved to Göteborg, where she was organist at the cathedral until she died. She performed frequently and conducted performances of her works for choir and orchestra. In 1897 she took charge of the so-called Labour Concerts, for which she organized about 800 concerts. She became a member of the Swedish Royal Academy of Music in ...

Article

Irina Boga

(b Braşov, Romania, Oct 18, 1946). Romanian conductor and composer. He studied at the Bucharest Conservatory with Constantin Bugeanu (conducting) and Ștefan Niculescu (composition), received the Herder grant, and studied at the Vienna Academy of Music with Hans Swarowsky and Karl Österreicher, continuing his education with Sergiu Celibidache in Bucharest, Trier, and Munich. He has been the main conductor of the Ploiești Philharmonic (1974–87), main conductor of the Bucharest Philharmonic (1987), and musical director of the National Radio Orchestra (1992). Horia Andreescu is a permanently invited conductor at the Radio Orchestra Berlin (1981–93), Dresden Philharmonic Orchestra (1983–93), and Staatskapelle Schwerin (1979–90). He conducted prestigious ensembles including the Wiener Symphoniker, Gewandhaus Leipzig, the Madrid, Lisabon, Copenhagen, and Leipzig Radio Orchestras, the Stuttgart Philharmonic Orchestra, the BBC—Scottish Symphony Orchestra, the Berliner Staatskapelle, the Israel Chamber Orchestra, the Netherlands Chamber Orchestra, NDR—Hamburg, and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra—London. He received numerous awards in international competitions (‘Nicolai Malco’, ‘Ernest Ansermet’), the Critics’ Award at the Berlin Musical Biennial (an award for his entire activity), the ‘Conductor of the Year’ in ...

Article

Rainer E. Lotz

(b São Paulo, 1892; d Rio de Janeiro, 1979). Brazilian bandleader, violinist, and saxophonist. He studied music in Rio de Janeiro (1917–19) and directed his own dance orchestra, gradually changing its repertory from Latin American music to jazz. He recorded prolifically on the Odeon label (1919–24) and although he did not perform as a soloist he became one of the pioneers of jazz in Brazil. While touring Europe (1924–34) he played for a time with the dancer and bandleader Grégor Kélékian. He made several recordings for Grammophon in Berlin (including Everything is hotsy totsy now, 20338, and Big Bad Bill, 20340, both 1926), some of which show to advantage the hot trumpet playing of Mickey Diamond and the blue blowing on kazoo of Sydney Sterling. (R. E. Lotz: “Eduardo Andreozzi: the Jazz Pioneer from Brazil,” Sv, no.122 (1985–6), 62 [incl. discography])...

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José López-Calo

(b Sanahuja, Lérida, Nov 7, 1786; d Barcelona, Nov 23, 1853). Spanish choirmaster and composer. He began his musical studies in the cathedral at Seo de Urgel, where he was a choirboy for nine years. Later he moved to Barcelona for advanced study with Juan Quintana (organ) and Francisco Queralt (composition). In 1808 he entered the competition for choirmaster of Tarragona Cathedral; although he was ranked first by the examining tribunal, the chapter of the cathedral did not grant him the position. On 1 June of the same year he won the post of choirmaster of Tafalla, but turned it down to take an identical position at Segorbe Cathedral, where he remained until 1814, when he was appointed choirmaster of S María del Mar in Barcelona. In 1819 he was named choirmaster of Valencia Cathedral and in 1830 advanced to the same post at Seville Cathedral. All of these appointments were obtained by competitions. In ...

Article

William Osborne

(b Wayne, OH, Jan 19, 1862; d Honolulu, HI, Aug 18, 1932). American organist, conductor, teacher, and composer. His family moved to Oberlin when Andrews was six; two years later he began study at what was then a department of music of Oberlin College. He graduated from what had become a Conservatory of Music in 1879 and only three years later joined its faculty, where he spent the rest of his career until retirement in 1931. He took two leaves for further study in Leipzig, Munich, and Paris and eventually became a nationally known organ recitalist. He was a founding member of the American Guild of Organists and later an honorary president of that organization. He was named organist and later director of Oberlin’s Musical Union and also of the Conservatory Orchestra, serving the former for thirty years, the latter for two decades. He also conducted choruses in Akron and elsewhere in northern Ohio. Oberlin conferred an honorary Master of Arts degree on Andrews in ...

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Rudolf Klein

(b Vienna, May 16, 1927). Austrian conductor, viola player and composer. From 1941 to 1946 he studied theory, the piano, violin and organ at the Vienna Music Academy. After playing the viola in the Vienna SO and winning a medal at the Geneva Music Competition in 1948, he was engaged by the Zürich Tonhalle Orchestra, and then by the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande (1949–52). From 1953 to 1956 he was principal viola player in the Vienna SO. He also won first prize for an organ composition in the competition in Haarlem in 1954.

Angerer’s subsequent career as a conductor has extended from the post of director and chief conductor of the Vienna Chamber Orchestra (1956–63), and numerous tours as guest conductor, to an engagement as composer and conductor of the Vienna Burgtheater (1960–64). In this capacity he wrote and performed music for various plays. He was principal conductor of the opera house of Bonn (...

Article

John Beckwith

(b Budapest, April 12, 1919; d Kingston, ON, February 24, 2012). Canadian composer, conductor and pianist of Hungarian birth. He studied with Kodály at the Budapest Academy (1937–41). As a young man he spent a period with other Jewish youths in a forced-labour contingent of the Hungarian Army; his later war experiences – escape, then concealment by friends during the winter of 1944–5 – are described in the memoirs of the novelist Theresa de Kerpely (Teresa Kay). After a season as assistant conductor at the Budapest Opera (1945–6), he went to Paris for further studies in piano (Soulima Stravinsky), conducting (Fourestier) and composition (Boulanger), remaining there for three years. He moved to Canada in 1949 (taking Canadian nationality in 1955), and for three years held a Lady Davis Fellowship and an appointment as assistant professor at McGill University. There he founded the electronic music studio and served for six years as chair of the department of theoretical music. He held grants for electronic music research from the Canada Council (...