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Gary W. Kennedy

(b Chicago, June 30, 1954; d Sweden, Aug 14, 1997). Double bass player. His father was Swedish and his mother, who was from India, performed classical Indian dance. During the 1960s he lived with his family in New Haven, Connecticut, where he studied piano and double bass and also learned to play guitar, tablā, and chromatic harmonica. In the mid-1970s he moved west to study composition at the University of California, Los Angeles; although he left the university after a year to work as a performer, he later completed his BA. In summer 1978 he studied tablā in India. While working in the Los Angeles area von Essen developed associations with many musicians, most importantly Alex Cline, Nels Cline (with whom he recorded in a duo in 1980), Vinny Golia, the violinist Jeff Gauthier, and the pianist Wayne Peet; in 1979 he formed the group Quartet Music with the Cline brothers and Gauthier. From the early 1980s he appeared regularly at Linda’s, a bar in Los Angeles, performing with such pianists as Alan Broadbent, Lou Levy, Gerry Wiggins, and Jimmie Rowles; he continued to work with Levy and Rowles into the 1990s, recording under Levy’s leadership (...

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Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tochigi, Japan, Dec 29, 1938). Japanese drummer, brother of Sadao Watanabe. He started singing at clubs in 1955, then changed to drums and made his professional début with Shungo Sawada’s group in 1957. Later he joined, among others, Masao Yagi’s trio and the quartet led by the tenor saxophonist Kazunori Takeda, worked with his brother’s group (1968–9, 1973) and the trios led by Takehiro Honda (1970) and Yosuke Yamashita (1972), and played with David Izenzon in Ornette Coleman’s trio (1967, in Tokyo). Watanabe led his own quintet and the trio Big Bird (consisting of Tsuyoshi Yamamoto and the double bass player Tsutomu Okada) from 1976. In 1995 he performed with Junior Mance and Barry Harris.

Article

Yozo Iwanami

revised by Kazunori Sugiyama and Barry Kernfeld

(b Tokyo, Oct 14, 1953). Japanese guitarist and leader. He took piano lessons at the age of eight, studied guitar with Sadanori Nakamure at the Yamaha Music School in Tokyo when he was 12, and performed and recorded professionally while still in his teens. After working in groups led by Isao Suzuki, Masaru Imada, the alto saxophonist Yoshio Otomo, the alto and soprano saxophonist Hidefumi Toki, and, most importantly, Sadao Watanabe, he played jazz-rock from the mid-1970s and formed the successful group Kylyn in 1979. That same year he toured the world as a guest soloist with the Japanese pop group Yellow Magic Orchestra, and in the early 1980s he took a similar role with Steps (1982), the Brecker Brothers, and Jaco Pastorius’s band Word of Mouth (1983). In 1983 he formed the Mobo Band, with the saxophonist Mitsuru Sawamura, the pianist Ichiko Hashimoto, the electric bass guitarist Gregg Lee, the drummer Shuichi Murakami, and Kiyohiko Senba; with the band he played with several American musicians and performed frequently in New York. Thereafter he continued to tour in the USA and Europe and formed a trio in which he played both electric guitar and guitar synthesizer. Watanabe toured Asia in ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama and Barry Kernfeld

(b Utsunomiya, Japan, Feb 1, 1933). Japanese alto and soprano saxophonist, flutist, leader, and educator, brother of Fumio Watanabe. His father was a professional musician who played biwa and sang. Watanabe was attracted to jazz at an early age and learned to play clarinet in high school. In 1951 he moved to Tokyo, where he changed to alto saoxphone and in 1953 began flute studies with Ririko Hayashi of the Tokyo Philharmonic Orchestra. He also joined Toshiko Akiyoshi’s Cozy Quartet, and in 1956, when Akiyoshi went to the USA, took over leadership of the group. From 1962 to 1965 he attended the Berklee School of Music and played and wrote arrangements for the school’s Jazz in the Classroom series. While in the USA he worked with Gary McFarland, Chico Hamilton, and Gábor Szabó (1965). After returning to Tokyo, Watanabe was appointed director of the new Yamaha Institute of Popular Music, whose curriculum and teaching methods were modeled after those of Berklee. From ...

Article

Peter Darke

(Herbert )

(b Rangoon, Burma, Dec 9, 1918). British guitarist and trombonist. He started playing guitar in the late 1930s with a college band in Burma. Following the Japanese invasion of the country in 1942 he was evacuated to India and played guitar and, later, trombone with Teddy Weatherford’s band at the Grand Hotel, Calcutta (1942–5). After Weatherford’s death he was a featured soloist with Reuben Solomon’s Jive Boys, with whom he also made some recordings (including My Gal Sal, 1942, Col. FB40231), but later in 1945 he returned to Burma with his own band. He went to England in 1947, led several bands, and played and recorded with many others. From 1968 until his retirement in 1984 he concentrated on radio and television work.

K. P. Darke: “Teddy Weatherford’s Indian Recording Sessions 1941–45,” Matrix, nos.107–8 (1975), 3 P. Darke and R. Gulliver: “Teddy Weatherford,” Sv, no.65 (1976), 175...

Article

Yozo Iwanami

revised by Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, Nov 14, 1932). Japanese pianist, composer, and arranger. He began his career performing Hawaiian music on steel guitar, and then, while still in high school, played jazz piano with the Ichiban Octet, led by the tenor saxophonist Shin Matsumoto. In 1956 he joined the Cozy Quartet when Toshiko Akiyoshi left the band and Sadao Watanabe took over its leadership. In 1959 he formed his own group, which the following year recorded music by Thelonious Monk, in whose work he had taken a keen interest. He recorded with Charlie Mariano and Hidehiko Matsumoto (1964) and then began working as a composer and arranger; he also recorded with Helen Merrill (1969). Later he led a jazz-rock ensemble, continued to lead a bop group, and recorded as a leader (1976). Yagi’s best-known composition is Oniwa soto, fukuwa uchi (Demons go away, happiness come in); his others include ...

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Kazunori Sugiyama

[Yamajoh ]

(b Kyoto, Japan, Oct 27, 1968). Japanese alto and soprano saxophonist and leader. He took lessons on piano from the age of five and trombone from the age of ten and changed to alto saxophone when he was 12; two years later he began to play jazz. His first work was in Yutaka Shiina’s group, Yoichi Kobayashi’s Good Fellas, and a band led by Motohiko Hino and Terumasa Hino. In 1992 he led a quartet consisting of Shiina, Shigeo Aramaki, and Dairiki Hara. Yamada also co-led the group Alto Nakayoshi Koyoshi with Seiji Tada (from 1993) and worked with Keiji Matsushima’s quintet and with Aramaki’s group. His name has been misspelled in music literature as Joe Yamada, and he has thereby been confused with a Japanese-born American pianist and composer of the same name.

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Karatsu, Japan, Sept 1, 1946). Japanese tenor saxophonist and leader. He started on alto saxophone in the big band at Keio University (Tokyo) at the age of 18 and first played professionally with Ryo Kawasaki’s quintet in 1970. Having changed to the tenor instrument, he was a member of George Otsuka’s quintet from ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Niigata, Japan, March 23, 1948). Japanese pianist. He received some piano lessons as a child, but taught himself to play in his high school years after listening to recordings by Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers. While at Nippon University he began working professionally, initially accompanying the Japanese pop singer Micky Curtis, with whom he toured Europe in 1967. From 1974 he was the house pianist at Misty, a popular jazz club in Tokyo, and later that same year he made his first recordings as a leader. Later he performed at the festivals in Monterey (1977) and Montreux (1979) and lived in New York for a year, when he performed with Dizzy Gillespie, Carmen McRae, Sam Jones, Billy Higgins, Elvin Jones, and Sonny Stitt, among others. Yamamoto continued to play at Misty into the 1990s and recorded on a regular basis.

(recorded for Three Blind Mice unless otherwise indicated)...

Article

Yozo Iwanami

revised by Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, Feb 26, 1942). Japanese pianist. He worked professionally from the age of 17, attended the Kunitachi College of Music in Tokyo (1962–7), and was a member of quartets led by Masahiko Togashi and Sadao Watanabe. His early style, which owed something to the work of Bill Evans (ii), gave way to one considerably more adventurous around 1969, and he played free jazz as the leader of groups that included the tenor saxophonist Kazunori Takeda, the tenor and soprano saxophonist Seiichi Nakamura, and Akira Sakata. From 1974 he worked principally in Europe, and he recorded in Germany as the leader of a trio (1974–6), as a sideman with Manfred Schoof (1975), as an unaccompanied soloist (1975–6), and in a duo with Adelhard Roidinger (1977); he also appeared at festivals in Germany and Yugoslavia and at the Newport Jazz Festival in New York. From ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Nobeoka, Japan, Feb 1, 1960). Japanese pianist and leader. He started piano lessons at the age of eight, learned violin from the age of ten, and took up drums when he was 13. Having made his début at a hotel lounge in Miyazaki in 1978, he moved to Tokyo in 1981 and joined Isao Suzuki’s group Soul Family. He then played in the bands led by the guitarist Yoshiyuki Miyanoue (from 1983), the tenor saxophonist Masato Imazu (from 1988), the trumpeter Hiroshi Murata and Yoichi Kobayashi (both 1986–9), and Eiji Kitamura (from 1997). In 1990 Yoshioka, who is known for his funky swing style, formed a trio, which was sometimes expanded to a quintet.

(recorded for Fun House unless otherwise indicated)

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, April 30, 1931; d Tokyo, Sept 12, 1998). Japanese double bass player. A professional musician from 1959, he performed with the alto saxophonist Keiichiro Ebihara, Eiji Kitamura, and Shungo Sawada before joining Yosuke Yamashita’s trio in 1965; in this last year he began to accompany poets, actors, and dancers. In 1968 he formed his own trio, with saxophone (Mototeru Takagi) and drums (Tatsuya Nakamura, replaced by Yoshisaburo Toyozumi), and in the late 1960s to early 1970s he worked with Masahiko Togashi, in whose quartet (alongside Takagi and Masayuki Takayanagi) he recorded in 1969. In 1970 he began to appear as an unaccompanied soloist, though he continued to work as a sideman and leader, playing, for example, with Takayanagi (in whose trio he recorded in that same year) and in a duo or trio with Kaoru Abe (recording in 1975), and appearing as a guest soloist with Toshinori Kondo and others in the cooperative group Evolution Ensemble Unity (...

Article

Howard Rye and Barry Kernfeld

(b Chicago, Jan 7, 1936; d Thailand, February 12, 2007). American bass player and singer. He learned double bass at high school and later studied at the Chicago Conservatory. After working with King Kolax (1951) and with various blues singers, including Joe Turner (ii), T-Bone Walker, and Joe Williams (mid-1950s), from 1956 he played cello and double bass in Ramsey Lewis’s trio, which made many recordings for Argo. Young also recorded as a sideman with Lorez Alexandria (1957) and James Moody (Hey! It’s Moody, 1959, Argo 666) and as a leader (1961). In 1966 he and Redd Holt (Lewis’s drummer) left Lewis and formed the soul band Young–Holt Unlimited, with which Young played both double bass and electric bass guitar. In 1990 Young–Holt Unlimited was a trio with the pianist Jeremy Monteiro. Young and Holt also appeared together in April 1984...

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