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Article

Gwarje  

Clapper bell of the Zamfara Hausa people of Nigeria. Made of forged, folded, or cast iron, brass, or bronze, it is fastened around the necks of animals or hung on the inside of woven hut doors as a warning device against thieves.

K. Krieger: ‘Musikinstrumente der Hausa’, Baessler-Archiv, new ser....

Article

Gwinza  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Article

Hémbu  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Article

Hentshi  

K.A. Gourlay

revised by Ferdinand J. de Hen

Percussion sticks of the Kaka people of the Central African Republic. They consist of two planks and a thick branch 150 to 180 cm long. Each of three players holds his piece of wood vertically in the left hand and alternately raises and lowers it, stamping it on the ground, at the same time striking it with a stick held in his right hand. ...

Article

Hewa  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Whistle of the Babenzele Pygmies of the Central African Republic and adjoining areas. It is made of pawpaw stem, about 7 to 8 cm long, and plays a single note. The hindewhu, which may be played by a woman, is blown in alternation with sung notes, for example to announce the result of a successful hunt....

Article

Idedjai  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Single-string Tube fiddle of Burundi. It corresponds to the taratibu of Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (where it is used by the Bale people) and to the endingidi of Uganda, whence it came to Burundi probably during the first half of the 20th century and where, as ...

Article

Idzdjai  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Article

Ifondo  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Article

Ìgbìn  

K.A. Gourlay

revised by Amanda Villepastour

Set of thick, squat cylindrical or slightly barrel-shaped drums of the Yorùbá people of Nigeria. Each has three feet and a single head affixed by a securing ring and large wooden pegs. Names of individual drums vary according to locality, for example in Ọ̀yọ́, in descending order of size, ìyá igbin, jagba, and apele (or ìyá ńlá); in Ẹdẹ the terms are ìyá gan, keke, and afere. The accompanying drums may more generally be called omele akọ and omele abo (male and female). The largest drum is played with a stick held by the right hand and muted by the the palm, fist, or fingers of the left; the other drums are played with two straight sticks. The drums are sacred to the deity of creativity, Ọbàtálá (or Òrìṣàńlá). Linked with ìgbìn is ìpẹ̀sẹ̀ music, the two names being alternatives for the same kind of drum according to context and instrumental group. The ...

Article

Igonga  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

[bogonga]

Mouth bow of the Ngombe people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It was also used as a hunting bow and also known as ingonga, lonkoko (Nkundo), bongoga (Injolo, Saka, Kutu), and lingongo (Ngando).

Article

Ihembe  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Lamellaphone of the Kwango and Kasayi regions of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The body is made from three pieces of very soft wood, nailed together with long wooden nails. It measures about 30 by 13 cm and has 8 to 20 wooden or bamboo tongues. Sometimes it is held in a calabash as a resonator, or a calabash can be attached on a stick, to enhance its sonority....

Article

Ikpo  

Article

Imbembb  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Article

Imele  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Pluriarc of the Oli and Saka peoples of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is made from a partly hollowed piece of wood, closed at the bottom. The open side is covered by a wooden soundboard, bound to the body with rattan, and the joint between body and soundboard is sealed with resin to render it airtight. Part of the body projects beyond the soundboard. The six strings of raffia (nkinga) are each held by a separate bow stuck into the projection, each string passing through a hole in the soundboard and tied under it; a piece of hard liana serves as a nut. The imele is held on the knees parallel with the player’s legs, and the strings are never damped when playing. A larger but otherwise similar pluriarc with five strings, called lukombe, is held transversely on the knees.

LaurentyC, 117 F.J. de Hen: Beitrag zur Kenntnis der Musikinstrumente aus Belgisch Kongo und Ruanda-Urundi...

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Article

Inkoko  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

[ikoko]

Lamellaphone of the Saka, Ngando, and Yala peoples of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has five to eight wooden tongues and a box resonator hollowed from a piece of wood. The soundtable is tied to the resonator by rattan or raffia cords through a series of holes.

J. S. Laurenty...

Article

Inkota  

Ferdinand J. de Hen