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F.J. de Hen

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Bongoga  

F.J. de Hen

Simple Mouth bow of the Bokote, Saka and Kutu of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Variant names are bongombo (Nkole), bongenge (Ntomba), bongogo (Oli and Mbole), bogonga or igonga (Ngombe). See also Lusuba .

LaurentyC, 113 F.J. de Hen: Beitrag zur Kenntnis der Musikinstrumente aus Belgisch Kongo und Ruanda-Urundi (Tervuren, 1960), 131–7...

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Bongolo  

F.J. de Hen

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Bongoo  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

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Bonguma  

F.J. de Hen

Article

F.J. de Hen

Cylindrical wooden Slit-drum of the Nkanda (Ngando) of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The Nkundo use this name to denote a slit drum of very large dimensions. The Komo know it as mongungu.

LaurentyTF, 134 F.J. de Hen: Beitrag zur Kenntnis der Musikinstrumente aus Belgisch Kongo und Ruanda-Urundi (Tervuren, 1960), 57...

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F.J. de Hen

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Bonkeli  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

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Bonkolo  

Rainer Polak

[bon, bonjalan, sogolon]

Conical drum of the Bamana, Boso, and Somono peoples of Mali. The hardwood body is 50 to 70 cm tall and 25 to 30 cm in diameter. A single head of goatskin or antelope rawhide is sewn to a rope lacing affixed to small holes near the bottom. The head is beaten by one bare hand and with one light stick, which produces a sharp cracking sound. The drum can be tuned by screwing short sticks into the staggered lacing. Ensembles usually consist of two to four bonkolo, one as the lead drum, the other(s) for ostinato accompaniment. Ensembles are complemented by a gangan (cylindrical drum of the dunun type) and a kettledrum (cun) up to 70 cm in diameter, which produces powerful bass lines. The most prominent focus of bonkolo-led drum ensemble performance is masquerade and puppetry of the Ségou region in central Mali. Bonjalan and ...

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Bonkuka  

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Scraper of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Various types of scrapers bear this or a similar name. The Lia and Oli peoples call it bonkwasa and the Nkundo call it bonkwata. The Konda and Kala know it also as bokwese. Typically it is a bamboo tube with one or several slits notched on both edges or sometimes only on one edge. Wooden ones are rare and mostly confined to the Lower Congo. Here variant forms exist, such as a wooden box with a grooved stick attached to a board; an anthropomorphic body covered with skin; or a box shaped like a goat, with a notched bamboo tube replacing the vertebrae and scraped with two sticks, one solid and the other partly slit. Lemba-type wooden slit drums sometimes have the sides of the slot notched to serve also as scrapers.

F.J. de Hen: Beitrag zur Kenntnis der Musikinstrumente aus Belgisch Kongo und Ruanda-Urundi...

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Boonzu  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

[mpongi]

Side-blown animal horn of the Nkundo people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has a fingerhole in the tip. This term can also be applied to a side-blown ivory trumpet with carved mouthpiece and pointed tip, of the Kala people of the northwestern DRC.

J.S. Laurenty: Systématique des aerophones de l’Afrique centrale...

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Boro  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Whistle of the Barambo people in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is made of two pieces of wood shaped to form a slender conical bore and bound together with animal skin. To make it airtight before playing, water is poured in. Many other names designate the same instrument among the Barambo (e.g. ...

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Bote  

Bowl-shaped kettledrum used in northern Sierra Leone by Susu, Mandingo, Yalunka, and Koranko musicians. It is approximately 40 to 50 cm in diameter and is played suspended at waist level. The player strikes the head with his right hand, while clapping together metal rings (baba) on the thumb and two fingers of the left hand. ...

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Ferdinand J. de Hen

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Boy  

Generic term for drum, used by the Dogon people of Mali. The term also refers to the rhythm beaten for the dance and to the dancing place itself (boy yala). The large and small double-headed cylindrical drums, boy na and boy dagi, respectively, have laced skins; they are played in a slanting position (the ...

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Boyeke  

K.A. Gourlay

Scraper of the Konda people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is made from a wooden stick or piece of bamboo with a wide longitudinal slit and notches cut in the edges throughout its length. Among the Komo people scrapers of this type are known as etulu, while the Lia and Oli refer to the instrument as ...

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