181-200 of 220 results  for:

  • Collector or Curator x
Clear all

Article

Danica Petrović

(b Buda, [now Budapest], 18/August 30, 1831; d Buda, 5/April 17, 1865). Serbian composer and folksong collector. He studied in Vienna with Simon Sechter (harmony and counterpoint) and Rudolf Willmers (the piano), and was directly influenced by the Slovenian circle of intellectuals in Vienna at that time. In Serbia, church chant and folk singing, the basic forms of musical practice, survived hitherto mainly through oral tradition, and while still a student Stanković began to write down and harmonize secular music. He published his first adaptations of Serbian folksongs for voice and piano or four-part choir in Vienna between 1851 and 1854. Shortly afterwards he published a further four collections of folksongs and a series of virtuoso piano miniatures and variations. Three collections of church chant were dedicated to the ‘Serb nation’. Stanković’s collected Serbian folk melodies were used by Rimsky-Korsakov, Tchaikovsky, and others in their compositions....

Article

Richard Rephann

[Morris]

(b Scheinfeld, Bavaria, March 9, 1831; d New Haven, CT, Jan 21, 1912). American music dealer and collector of instruments. He moved to New Haven in 1854, and in 1856 to Savannah, Georgia. Shortly after the Civil War broke out he returned to New Haven, and his name appeared in the New Haven City Directory of 1862; by 1866 he was listed as a piano and music dealer. He formed the Mathushek Pianoforte Co. and later the M. Steinert & Sons Co., which sold pianos in Boston, Providence, New Haven and other cities. He was active in the musical life of New Haven where he was organist at St Thomas’s Church, taught music and formed a quartet in which he played cello. He later formed an orchestra which was to become the nucleus around which he founded the New Haven SO in 1894. This orchestra is the fourth oldest in the USA with a continuous existence. He became interested in antique musical instruments and the problems involved in playing them, and assembled a collection of considerable importance which was exhibited in Vienna in ...

Article

Michael Kassler

(b London, April 22, 1759; d Farley Hill, Berks., Sept 15, 1833). English music collector. After studying at Oxford, he joined family members in a banking firm, and in 1794 was appointed sheriff of Berkshire. A friendship with the musician Charles Frederick Horn (Stephenson and J.P. Salomon were godfathers to Horn’s son Charles Edward) may have led to his activities in the cause of J.S. Bach, which ranged from his gathering Bach enthusiasts to celebrate Bach’s birthday at his home in 1810 to his preparation in about 1808 of an English translation of J.N. Forkel’s biography. This translation, which Horn and Samuel Wesley planned to publish, is not known to be extant; its relationship to the first published translation (London, 1820) is unknown. W.T. Parke called Stephenson’s collection of Cremona violins (which included Stradivari’s 1704 ‘Glennie’ violin and 1731 ‘Paganini’ viola) ‘perhaps the best and most valuable … of any private gentleman in England’. Stephenson’s manuscript collection included J.C. Smith’s copy of Handel’s ...

Article

Lada Brashovanova

(b Samokov, Dec 5, 1880; d Sofia, Dec 5, 1938). Bulgarian folklorist. He taught himself the violin at the age of ten. After graduating from the ecclesiastic seminary in Samokov in 1897, he taught in neighbouring villages until 1907 and was able to take down many of the folksongs from the area. He then studied at the Brussels Conservatory (1907–10) and from 1911 to 1922 taught music in Sofia, Tarnovo, Plovdiv and Samokov, organizing and conducting choirs and school orchestras. In 1925 he began lecturing in folk music at the State Music Academy, where in 1927 he became a professor and, for a few months in 1931, director. He also held the post of president of the Union of Bulgarian Musicians and in 1926 founded a folk-music department in the National Ethnographical Museum. Together with Rayna Katsarova and other musicians Stoin established the tradition of collecting and publishing texts and melodies of thousands of Bulgarian folksongs. In addition to four theoretical studies and a number of articles Stoin collected 9000 songs from the whole of Bulgaria, often under difficult conditions and with scarcely any technical equipment. This activity laid the foundations for Bulgarian folklore studies....

Article

Lada Brashovanova

(b Samokov, April 12, 1915). Bulgarian folklorist, daughter of Vasil Stoin. She graduated from the State Academy of Music in Sofia in 1938 and was a music teacher in various schools until 1945. In 1946 she was appointed research assistant in the Ethnographical Museum in Sofia and from 1950 to 1970 she worked as junior research fellow of the folk music department in the Music Institute of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, becoming senior research fellow in 1970. She took part in several folksong-collection expeditions in the 1950s, including north-west Bulgaria (1956), and the Tran, Bresnik and Kyunstendil regions in 1957–8 (see Kompleksna nauchna ekspeditsiya v zapadna Balgariya: Transko, Bresnishko, Kyustendilsko 1957–58 [The complete scientific expeditions in west Bulgaria: the Tran, Bresnik and Kyustendil regions 1957–8], ed. P. Staynov, Sofia, 1961). Her writings consist largely of the publication and evaluation of her findings.

‘Savremennata balgarska narodna pesen’ [Contemporary Bulgarian folksong], ...

Article

Jiří Vysloužil

(b Rousínov, nr Slavkov, June 14, 1804; d Bystřice pod Hostýnem, May 31, 1868). Moravian folksong collector. He was educated at the grammar school at Kroměříž, a centre of Baroque music in Moravia, and took orders in Brno in 1827. Contact with the folklore of his birthplace and other parts of Moravia and Silesia determined his Czech national consciousness and Slavonic cultural interests. By 1832 he had prepared for publication the first folksong collection in Moravia; the result of Sušil's systematic, and in his time unique, collecting activity, Moravské národní písně (‘Moravian folksongs’), grew into one of the most remarkable monuments of Czech culture of the first half of the 19th century, containing 2091 tunes and 2361 texts. It includes every basic kind of folksong, traditional ballads, ceremonial songs, shepherds' tunes and typical dance-songs from the whole of Moravia and the southern part of Silesia. Moravian Folksongs did not claim the status of a scholarly work, but as documented evidence of the contemporary Moravian folksong repertory the collection has been valuable both as a source for musicologists and for its relatively accurate notation. Sušil carefully recorded the use of dialect in the texts and respected and preserved such characteristic features of the melodies as their non-diatonic inflections. However, his musical education was influenced by Baroque and Classical music theory, and his use of conventional key signatures in the transcriptions shows that he regarded the songs as being basically either in major or minor tonality. He organized the rhythm in regular bars, mostly 2/4, 3/4 and 4/4, and only occasionally used compound metres. His views on the character of the Slavonic and Czech folk music in Moravia, expressed in the preface to the collection, had a direct influence on the growth of modern Czech music, particularly upon Křížovský, who first harmonized and later artistically reshaped and incorporated a number of melodies and texts from the ...

Article

Albi Rosenthal

(b Oxford, Feb 11, 1838; d Oxford, Jan 8, 1905). English music and instrument dealer and collector . He was the son of Charles Taphouse (c1816–1881), the founder of the firm of Charles Taphouse & Son Ltd, first established in 1857 at 10 Broad Street, Oxford, shortly after at 33 St Giles, and from 1859 at 3 Magdalen Street. Taphouse held various local appointments as organist, and made the music shop into a lively musical centre, having added a piano warehouse and several music rooms to the premises – one of which was for many years the home of the Oxford University Music Club. His collection of early music and instruments, which contained numerous rare and some unique printed and manuscript items (including the only contemporary source of the Violin Sonata by Henry Purcell), became one of the finest in the country. The library was sold by auction at Sotheby, Wilkinson & Hodge's in ...

Article

Charles Beare

(b Fontaneto d’Agogna, nr Novara, c1790; d Milan, Oct 1854). Italian violin dealer and collector . He was born of humble parents and is said to have trained as a carpenter, with violin playing as a hobby. He developed an interest in violins themselves, and with a natural talent both as a connoisseur and for business he began to acquire and resell some of the many fine instruments that were lying unused in the towns and villages of northern Italy. His first journey to Paris (in 1827) was evidently profitable for him and for the dealers there, who gave him every encouragement. In the same year he made his greatest coup, acquiring a number of violins from Count Cozio di Salabue, including a 1716 Stradivari in unused condition. This violin was Tarisio's treasure, and as he spoke of it on every visit to Paris but never actually brought it with him it came to be known as the ‘Messiah’....

Article

Taisiya Shcherbakova

(b Romanovo, Minsk Province, 11/23 Nov 1871; d Minsk, Nov 10, 1938). Belarusian folklorist and composer. A prominent figure in the Belarusian national renaissance of the early 20th century, he was the son of a priest, studied at the spiritual college in Slutsk, and in the Minsk Seminary or, supposedly, at the choristers' cappella in St Petersburg (around 1889). He taught singing in Russian high schools and music clubs, and in the 1890s was invited to join the Slavyanskaya kappella (‘Slavic cappella’), organized by D. Agrenev-Slavyansky in Moscow, as chorus master and singer. With the cappella he went on concert tours to England, France and Switzerland. According to the reminiscences of contemporaries, during the first decade of the 20th century he was one of the most respected musicians in Minsk. He directed one of the choirs of the Minsk Orthodox Eparchy, worked with poets, pamphleteers and playwrights in the ‘Belorusskaya khatka’ club, and also with the Association of Art Workers in Minsk....

Article

Marie Cornaz

(b Liège, July 20, 1902; d Liège, Sept 16, 1989). Belgian composer and folklorist. Born into a family of musicians and singers, she studied at the Liège Conservatory, where the composer Sylvain Dupuis was among her teachers, and won several prizes, including those for piano, chamber music, harmony and fugue; she later became a professor of solfège at the conservatory. She was awarded second prize in the Prix de Rome contest in 1929. Her output is dominated by vocal music, whether for the stage, solo voice or choir, in a style that is influenced by Walloon popular folk music; some pieces are in Walloon dialect and describe the people of her region. As a folklorist, she transcribed the music of many dances and songs and wrote several books and articles about her country’s folk traditions.

(selective list)

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by David Johnson

(b? Edinburgh, c1684; d ?London, after 1752). Scottish singer and folksong collector . His father was Daniel Thomson, one of the king's trumpeters for Scotland. He sang solos as a boy at a Musical Society concert in Edinburgh on St Cecilia's Day 1695. By 1722 he had settled in London, where he gave a benefit concert in February that year, including (according to Burney) a Scottish folksong as an encore.

Thomson published Orpheus Caledonius, a Collection of the Best Scotch Songs set to Musick (London, 1725), a lavishly produced volume dedicated to the Princess of Wales, with a subscription list of 300 notable people. It contains 50 Scottish folksongs, most of them taken from Allan Ramsay's Tea-table Miscellany (Edinburgh, 1723); the melodic ornaments and the figured bass accompaniments are Thomson's own. Hawkins described Thomson as ‘a tradesman’ and the collection as ‘injudicious and very incorrect’; it is true that some of the song texts are in crude, oral versions and that the figured basses have grammatical mistakes. In ...

Article

(b Melur, Mýrasýsla, Oct 14, 1861; d Reykjavík, Aug 2, 1938). Icelandic composer and folksong collector. Apart from early studies in harmony with Jónas Helgason, organist of Reykjavík Cathedral, he was self-taught as a musician. He studied theology at Reykjavík and from 1888 to 1935 was a priest at Siglufjörður. Early in the 1880s he became interested in Icelandic folk music, made study trips to Copenhagen and Stockholm (...

Article

(b Copenhagen, Sept 10, 1873; d Copenhagen, Jan 13, 1912). Danish folklorist. After taking the state examination in theology (1898) he worked as a schoolteacher until 1905. His main area of research was the folk music of the Faeroe Islands, particularly their dance-song; in 1902 he collected material for over 200 recordings there. He also analysed Inuit song from recordings made by William Thalbitzer in east Greenland. Illness prevented him from completing his work on medieval Danish ballads, which remains unpublished. His writings are notable for their originality and thoroughness, and include the following (all published in Copenhagen): Dans og kvaddigtning paa Faer øerne (1901); Folkesangen paa Faer øerne (1908); Vore sanglege: danske studier (1908); The Eskimo Music (with W. Thalbitzer, 1911); Melodies from East Greenland (1914); and Faerøske melodier til danske kaempeviser (1923, ed. H. Grüner Nielsen)....

Article

(b Bourg-en-Bresse, July 5, 1857; d Paris, Aug 10, 1936). French musicologist and folklorist . In 1876 he entered the Paris Conservatoire, where he became a pupil of Savard for harmony and Massenet for composition, and also studied the organ with Franck and music history with Bourgault-Ducoudray. He was appointed assistant to the Conservatoire librarian in 1883. Two years later he competed for the Bodin Prize of the Académie des Beaux-Arts with his Histoire de la chanson populaire en France; this work, which was published in 1889, brought him a commission from the government to collect folksongs in Savoy and the Dauphiné. The result was published in 1903 as Chansons populaires recueillies dans les Alpes françaises. With Charles Bordes, he supported the efforts of the Schola Cantorum to bring old music before a wider public, and he founded the Concerts Historiques du Cercle St Simon. He also contributed to the revival of interest in Berlioz and to the promotion of contemporary Scandinavian, Russian and Czech music in France. In ...

Article

Israel J. Katz

[Tomás Parés, Juan]

(b Barcelona, April 6, 1896; d Barcelona, Nov 7, 1967). Catalan choral director, composer and folklorist. From the age of 11 he studied solfège with Lluís Millet, the piano with María R. Canals and Juan Battista Pellicer and composition with Antonio Nicolau and Enrique Morera at the Barcelona Municipal School of Music. In 1908 Millet gave him a place in the children’s section of Orfeó Català, and later he joined the main chorus, becoming one of its deputy directors in 1946. In the same year he joined the newly founded Instituto Español de Musicología under Anglès. As a prominent choral director he conducted such choirs as the Chor Infantil Mossèn Cinto, la Escuela Coral de Tarrasa, Parroquia de S Paciano and Orfeó Lluis Millet; he taught music and was organist at the Colegio de S Ignacio de los PP Jesuítas de Sarriá and for the student group Pere Vila. In the early 1950s he became director of the schola cantorum of the Barcelona Seminary. His main area of research was Spanish folk music; having participated in many field trips throughout Catalonia, Castile and León, he began to prepare a systematic study of regional Spanish cancioneros, which is fundamental to the study of Spanish traditional folk music. His compositions include several choral works, including ...

Article

Elizabeth Kinder

(b Enfield, May 5, 1949). English composer, musician, writer and curator. He studied at Hornsey College of Art (1967–8) and, following a brief period at Watford College of Art and Design, returned to Hornsey to study painting, where he met Max Eastley. Due to lack of funding Toop secured a job at the Roundhouse, where he met the percussionist Paul Burwell. Together, Burwell and Toop, along with Steve Beresford and sound artist Peter Cusack, set up the London Musicians Collective in 1975. With Burwell, Toop established the band Rain in the Face, in which he played guitar and flute. Eager to explore mixed media, they collaborated with various musicians, dancers and the sound poet Bob Cobbing. Toop later worked with Brian Eno, John Zorn, Prince Far I, Jon Hassell, Derek Bailey, Talvin Singh, Evan Parker, Scanner, Ivor Cutler, Akio Suzuki, Haco and Jin Hi Kim, Steven Berkoff, Mitsutaka Ishii and John Latham amongst others....

Article

Israel J. Katz

(b Oviedo, April 8, 1888; d London, Feb 17, 1955). Spanish folklorist, writer on music and literature, teacher, choral conductor and composer . He began his musical education in Oviedo, studied the piano and composition at the Madrid Conservatory (1907–10), and, after two years in Oviedo conducting research on traditional Asturian music, went to the Schola Cantorum in Paris (1912–14), where he studied composition with d’Indy; he also went to lectures by Tiersot (who had influenced him earlier) at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes Sociales. He was invited by Ramón Menéndez Pidal to work at the Madrid Centro de Estudios Históricos in 1916, and was one of the remarkable group of artists living at the Residencia de Estudiantes which included Bal y Gay, Falla, Turina, Adolfo Salazar, Sainz de la Maza, Lorca, J. Ramón Jiménez, Buñuel and Dali. Later he dedicated to the institution his ...

Article

Howard Mayer Brown

revised by Florence Gétreau

(b Bordeaux, 1586–7; d Bordeaux, before 1649). French author, theorist, collector and lawyer. By profession a lawyer in the Parliament of Bordeaux he made use of the humanistic education he had received from his uncle, Jean d'Avril, by publishing during his lifetime two tragedies, a book on witchcraft and two volumes of epigrams. He was also a collector of books, printed portraits, medals, naturalia, ethnographic objects and mathematical and musical instruments; an inventory of the entire collection was printed in his Synopsis rerum variarum and translated in his Dénombrement. His interest in music is further demonstrated by the inclusion, among his publications, of poems in praise of two composers active in or near Bordeaux: the Spaniard Juan d'Escobar and Hugues de Fontenay. About 1630, or perhaps earlier, he began work on his Traité des instruments de musique. It was not published during his lifetime, possibly because he was not able to perfect it according to his own standards before he died. In his ...

Article

(fl 1612–22). Humanist aristocrat who lived in Prague. He was descended from a family from Rovereto, in the south Tyrol; one of its members was knighted at Vienna on 25 May 1557. In recognition of his services Troilus was named Councillor of the Emperor on 2 May 1617 in Prague, but this title carried no official duties. He assembled in his library a valuable collection of Italian monody published mostly in Venice between 1604 and 1618, and mainly by composers from northern Italy. It is a fairly representative collection of music that cannot have been well known in Bohemia at that time, but it includes nothing by such important figures as Caccini, Marco da Gagliano and Peri. The volume of monodies from Troilus’s library is now in the National Library in Prague.

J. Racek: Italská monodie z doby raného baroku v Čechách [Italian monody from the early Baroque time in Bohemia] (Olomouc, 1945)...

Article

Margarita Mazo

(b Ivanovskaya Sloboda, nr Belgorod, c1740; d St Petersburg, c1810). Ukrainian folksong collector and composer, resident in Russia. In 1761 he entered the Russian Imperial court as a singer and gusli player. Apparently by 1792 he left the court and continued to pursue his musical activities under the patronage of the Russian aristocracy. His Sobraniye russkikh prostïkh pesen s notami (‘Collection of Simple Russian Songs with Music’) was the first printed collection of Russian folksongs with melodies. Parts i-iii were published anonymously with texted melodies and a single bass line. In part iv and the 1796 edition of part i, Trutovsky added a fuller harmonic texture. The collection contained songs popular in St Petersburg at the time; parts iii–iv also contained Ukrainian songs. The melodies were mostly transcribed by Trutovsky himself although he used some materials from manuscript songbooks, previously published collections of songs texts, music by Russian composers and, in part iv, his arrangement of a Ukrainian song by Józef Kozłowski. Trutovsky did not organize the songs into categories; the ordering is based only on alternation between fast and slow songs. In his foreword he complains about the songs not written ‘according to the rules’ and, accordingly, he made them match the European system of keys, harmony and metre, adding instrumental lines for those wanting to play the songs on instruments or to sing them with instrumental accompaniment. The collection has considerable interest as a document of musical practices and repertory of the time. L′vov and Pratsch published 46 of the songs in their collection and several were used by the Russian composers Pashkevich, Serov, Musorgsky and Rimsky-Korsakov. Few of Trutovsky’s own compositions have survived. His song ...