2,021-2,040 of 57,944 results

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Antiphon 3. Origins and composition of melodies. (iii) Centonization.: Ex.7

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Antiphon 3. Origins and composition of melodies. (iii) Centonization.: Ex.8

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Antiphon 3. Origins and composition of melodies. (iii) Centonization.: Ex.9

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Antiphon 5. Other antiphons in the Gregorian repertory. (i) Antiphons to the Psalter.: Ex.13

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Antiphon 5. Other antiphons in the Gregorian repertory. (i) Antiphons to the Psalter.: Ex.14

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Antiphon 5. Other antiphons in the Gregorian repertory. (iii) Antiphons to the ‘Benedictus’ and ‘Magnificat’.: Ex.15

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Antiphon 5. Other antiphons in the Gregorian repertory. (iii) Antiphons to the ‘Benedictus’ and ‘Magnificat’.: Ex.16

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Antiphon from the Oldest Surviving Office of St Valeria of Limoges

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A Mass chant in the Mozarabic rite, corresponding to the communion of the Roman rite. See Mozarabic chant, §4, (xiii) .

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In the early Latin Christian rites, a part of the Mass Proper sung during the Fraction. See Ambrosian chant, §7, (i); Gallican chant, §7, (xiii) ; and Mozarabic chant, §4, (xii) .

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A processional chant sung at Matins in the Ambrosian rite. See Ambrosian chant, §6, (ii).

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A Mass chant sung at the kiss of peace in the Mozarabic rite. See Mozarabic chant, §4, (x) .

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A Mass chant of the Gallican and Mozarabic rites, corresponding to the introit of the Roman rite and the ingressa of the Ambrosian rite. See Gallican chant, §7, (i) and Mozarabic chant, §4, (i) .

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A Mass chant of the early Latin Christian rites. See Ambrosian chant, §7, (ii); Gallican chant, §7, (vii) ; and Gospel, §1 .

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A chant sung in the choir at Vespers on Sundays and feast days in the Ambrosian rite. See Ambrosian chant, §6, (ii).

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A Mass chant of the Ambrosian rite. See Ambrosian chant, §7, (ii) .

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A term describing works in which an ensemble is divided into distinct groups, performing in alternation and together. See Psalm, §II, 4; Chorus ; and Cori spezzati/polychoral .

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Laurence Libin

Division of an organ, whose chest and pipes are spatially separated from the main pipework so as to create an antiphonal effect when this division is played in alternation with others. Further, this division can be coupled to others for simultaneous playing that surrounds listeners with sound emanating from different locations. Antiphonal ranks need not have a dedicated manual but, in modern organs, often ‘float’ among several manuals by means of console controls. Development of the Antiphonal division was facilitated beginning in the late 19th century by electric and electropneumatic actions that simplify spatial separation of an organ’s components. However, it remained uncommon and nowadays normally appears only in large instruments. The term is also applied to a separate, independent, sometimes moveable organ, subsidiary to the main one in a building and played from its own console....

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An automatic player attachment for harmoniums and organs. It was invented by Alexandre-François Debain in 1846. See Mechanical instrument .

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Michel Huglo and David Hiley

Liturgical book of the Western Church containing the antiphons and other choir chants sung at the services of the Divine Office .

Although the word antiphona as a term for a liturgical chant can be traced back to the 3rd century, the term antiphonarius (rarely also ...