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A Mass chant of the early Latin Christian rites. See Ambrosian chant, §7, (ii); Gallican chant, §7, (vii) ; and Gospel, §1 .

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A chant sung in the choir at Vespers on Sundays and feast days in the Ambrosian rite. See Ambrosian chant, §6, (ii).

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A Mass chant of the Ambrosian rite. See Ambrosian chant, §7, (ii) .

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A term describing works in which an ensemble is divided into distinct groups, performing in alternation and together. See Psalm, §II, 4; Chorus ; and Cori spezzati/polychoral .

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Laurence Libin

Division of an organ, whose chest and pipes are spatially separated from the main pipework so as to create an antiphonal effect when this division is played in alternation with others. Further, this division can be coupled to others for simultaneous playing that surrounds listeners with sound emanating from different locations. Antiphonal ranks need not have a dedicated manual but, in modern organs, often ‘float’ among several manuals by means of console controls. Development of the Antiphonal division was facilitated beginning in the late 19th century by electric and electropneumatic actions that simplify spatial separation of an organ’s components. However, it remained uncommon and nowadays normally appears only in large instruments. The term is also applied to a separate, independent, sometimes moveable organ, subsidiary to the main one in a building and played from its own console....

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An automatic player attachment for harmoniums and organs. It was invented by Alexandre-François Debain in 1846. See Mechanical instrument .

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Michel Huglo and David Hiley

Liturgical book of the Western Church containing the antiphons and other choir chants sung at the services of the Divine Office .

Although the word antiphona as a term for a liturgical chant can be traced back to the 3rd century, the term antiphonarius (rarely also ...

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In Greek and Byzantine theory, the octave (or double octave) and singing in octaves.

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A term for music in which an ensemble is divided into distinct groups, used in opposition, often spatial, and using contrasts of volume, pitch, timbre etc. See Chorus, §3 and Cori spezzati/polychoral .

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Small, relatively thick Cymbals, of clear, definite pitch. Up to about 12 cm in diameter and commonly played in pairs, they are often called ‘finger cymbals’ and held each in one hand or looped to a finger and thumb of one hand. Sets of up to 13 (one chromatic octave) can be mounted on a frame and struck with light metal hammers. In modern parlance they are often called ...

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Martin Picker

(b ?Venice, fl early 16th century). Italian composer. 15 frottolas and 2 laudi are attributed to ‘A. de Antiquis’ (sometimes abbreviated to ‘A. de A.’) in the collections of Ottaviano Petrucci and Andrea Antico. Petrucci appended ‘Venetus’ to Antiquis's name in Frottole libro quinto...

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Donna G. Cardamone

(b Corato; d Bari, after 1608). Italian composer and anthologist. Antiquis was associated with the basilica of S Nicola, Bari, for most of his career, first as cleric (from 1565), then as canon and choirmaster. From 1606 to 1608 he was chaplain and singing teacher of the Conservatorio dei Poveri di Gesù Cristo in Naples. His two anthologies of ...

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An unnamed Beneventan bishop credited in the 12th-century Calixtine manuscript ( E-SC ) with a conductus, Jacobe sancte tuum repetito, that appears in both monophonic and polyphonic settings. The attribution may be fictitious, particularly since the Beneventan see was an archbishopric from 969.

J. López-Calo...

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See Barbe family

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See Barbe family

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See Barbe family

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See D'Argillières family

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See Forqueray family

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Jacqueline Gachet

In 

See Foucquet family

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Jacqueline Gachet

In 

See Foucquet family