You are looking at  2,021-2,040 of 57,402 articles

Article

Article

Eugene K. Wolf and Jean K. Wolf

In 

Article

Article

Sergio Martinotti

In 

Article

Werner Braun

In 

Article

Evan Baker

In 

Article

Robert Münster

In 

Article

Hanns Dennerlein

In 

Article

Othmar Wessely

In 

Article

Joseph Vella Bondin

In 

Article

Barry S. Brook and Richard Viano

In 

Article

Article

Peter Branscombe

In 

Article

Gary W. Kennedy

[Arthur ]

(b New York, Sept 8, 1926). American drummer. He studied music at New York University from 1943 to 1947, although he served in the navy between 1944 and 1946. In 1948 he played in the big bands of Herbie Fields, Sonny Dunham, and Bobby Byrne. He later rejoined Fields (1951), then worked with Bud Freeman (1952), Jerry Gray (1954), in a quintet with Charlie Barnet in Las Vegas (August 1954), and others. After leaving Barnet Anton worked as a freelance studio musician in Los Angeles, where he recorded with Jimmy Giuffre (1955) and later appeared in “Stan Kenton and his Orchestra,” which was part of the television series “Jazz Scene USA” (1962); he also held non-musical jobs.

Article

Elizabeth Forbes

(b Ferrara, April 5, 1961). Italian soprano . She studied in Bologna and made her début in 1986 at Arezzo as Rosina, then sang Flora (La traviata) at Bologna. In 1988, after winning the Pavarotti Competition, she sang Elizabeth (Maria Stuarda) in Bari Others of her roles are Horatia (Gli Orazi ed i Curiazi, Cimarosa) at Rome in 1989 and Lisbon, and the next year Fiordiligi at Venice and Macerata, Adalgisa at Catania, Polyxena in Manfroce’s Ecuba and the title role of Paisiello’s Elfrida at Savona. She also sang Mayr’s La rosa bianca e la rosa rossa at Bergamo. Her beautiful, dark-toned, flexible voice and dramatic temperament have been finely displayed in Rossini, as Dorliska at Savona, Ninetta (La gazza ladra) at Philadelphia, Anaï (Moïse) at Bologna, Semiramide at Catania and in the title role of Ermione at Rome (...

Article

Kevin E. Mooney

(b Port Arthur, TX, Oct 27, 1949; d Austin, TX, May 23, 2006). American nightclub owner, promoter, and producer. The son of Lebanese immigrants, he briefly attended the University of Texas at Austin (summer 1969), then opened an imported food and clothing store. Its backroom became a place for informal jam sessions, often with Antone playing bass. On 15 July 1975 he opened Antone’s. Although not the first or only club in Austin to book blues musicians, it became significant for both its relevance to the Austin music scene and the opportunities allowed for young musicians to share the stage with blues legends. In 1987 he launched recording label Antone’s Record and Tapes and opened Antone’s Records Shop. After serving two drug-related prison terms (1985–6; 1999–2002), Antone began an annual fundraiser for troubled youth. During the last two years of his life, he taught a course on the blues at both the University of Texas at Austin and Texas State University-San Marcos. A recipient of the National Blues Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award, he was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in ...

Article

[Abbondio, Abondio, Abundii]

(b Fabrica, nr Viterbo; d probably at Rome, ? in or before 1629) Italian composer and teacher. According to Casimiri he must have taught music at the Seminario Romano, Rome, some time between 1602 and 1606. The first post he held that is specifically documented is that of maestro di cappella of S Giovanni in Laterano, Rome, where he is recorded from 1 June 1611 to 20 July 1613 (there is no evidence to substantiate Pitoni’s and Baini’s statements that he was there by 1608); Tullio Cima was one of the boys who sang under him there. The title-pages and dedications of works that Antonelli published in 1614 and 1615 indicate that he was then maestro di cappella of Benevento Cathedral. That he had returned to Rome by February 1616 can be determined from the dedication of his print of that year. In 1619 he corresponded with Romano Micheli regarding what he considered to be Micheli’s excessive application of ...

Article

Iain Fenlon

(fl Mantua, 1606–49). Italian composer. He was a canon. His known works survive in two manuscripts (in I-Mc , Fondo S Barbara), the first containing 12 madrigals dated from Luzzara, near Mantua, in 1606, the second a setting in six sections of Rinuccini's Lamento d'Arianna which is ascribed to him on the cover in a contemporary hand. The title-page of the 1606 manuscript describes him as maestro di cappella of S Andrea, Mantua, and a copy of his will dated 22 March 1649 and kept with the manuscript implies that he was still at S Andrea at this date. The madrigals are all settings of Guarini, more specifically texts that had already been set by Monteverdi, then also working at Mantua, most of them in his fifth book of madrigals (1605). Reliance on Monteverdi's example is also evident in the Lamento, which thus places Antonelli even more firmly among those composers working at Mantua during the first decade of the 17th century – for example Amante Franzoni – who were heavily indebted to Monteverdi for textual, formal and sometimes stylistic models. At the same time the ...

Article

Paul David, Dennis Libby and Zofia Chechlińska

In 

Article

Emanuele Senici

(b Palermo, June 25, 1801; d Trieste, Aug 18, 1859). Italian composer and conductor. His grandfather and father, both composers and conductors, gave him his first instruction in music, and at the age of 12 he conducted his own mass for St Cecilia's Day. In 1817 he made his début in Palermo, as both conductor and composer, with the dramma giocoso Un duello per equivoco, ossia Gli amanti in disturbo. He subsequently travelled for a number of years, as a conductor and an impresario, in Italy, France and England, and was in Venice as conductor of a regimental band in the Austrian army. In 1824 he moved to Trieste to conduct another military band; there his opera semiseria Amina, ovvero L'innocenza perseguitata was successfully given the following year. The libretto, written in 1824 by Felice Romani for Giuseppe Rastrelli, is not the same as that of Bellini's La sonnambula...