2,101-2,120 of 57,944 results

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Eleanor Selfridge-Field

In 

See Fedeli family

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See Gordigiani family

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Antonio Lolli: drawing by Hardrich (Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin, Preussischer Kulturbesitz)

Deutsche Staatsbibliothek, Berlin

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Manuel Carlos De Brito

In 

See Costa family

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Anne Schnoebelen

In 

See Predieri family

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Arnold Myers and Eugenia Mitroulia

Family of three- or four-valve brass instruments whose general shape, with upturned bell, resembles somewhat the saxophone. In terms of acoustical design and mouthpiece antoniophones do not differ from equivalent standard brass band instruments. This model of instrument, sometimes said to be a redesign of the Courtois Koenig horn, was first produced in ...

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Sven Hansell and Emilia Zanetti

(b ?Milan, c1692; d Milan, 1776). Italian theorist and composer. He was living in Holland in the mid-1730s but then moved to London, where he stayed for more than two decades and wrote his treatise L’Arte armonica: or, A Treatise on the Composition of Musick...

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George Leotsakos

(b Athens, Feb 10, 1935). Greek composer. He studied the violin, singing and composition at the National Conservatory, Athens (1947–58); he also studied composition with Papaioannou at the Hellenic Conservatory, Athens (1956–61). His studies were continued with Günther Bialas at the Munich Musikhochschule, where he gained his first experience in electronic music. He made a tour of the USA in ...

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Mikaela Minga

(b Tirana, Albania, April 12, 1949; d Tirana, Sept 28, 2012). Albanian cellist. His parents were acclaimed artists. His father, Kristaq Antoniu, was a singer, actor, and stage director. His mother, Androniqi Zengo, was a painter. Between 1967 and 1973 Antoniu completed his cello studies at the Albanian Higher Institute of Arts (...

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Mikaela Minga

(b Bucharest, Romania, Dec 25, 1907; d Tirana, Albania, March 17, 1979). Tenor, actor, and stage director. He studied at the Mimodramatic High School of Bucharest and then in Rome, with M. Polverosi. In Romania, he had a successful career as an actor and singer. He was in the movie industry in the 1920s and early 30s, playing in more than 15 films, including ...

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F. Alberto Gallo and Andreas Bücker

(b ?Leno, nr Brescia; fl 1st half of the 15th century). Italian ?theorist. An incomplete treatise on music, in Italian, found in a manuscript of the second half of the 15th century ( I-Vnm Lat.336, coll.1581, 50v–64r), contains musical examples attributed to ‘Antonius de Leno musichus’; it is uncertain, however, whether the text of the treatise can safely be attributed to him. Only three sections survive: the first, on mutations, may have been the final part of a larger section on ...

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Beatrice Pescerelli

(fl 15th century). Italian theorist. He was a Servite friar and pupil of one Laurentius of Orvieto, a canon of S Maria Maggiore. His treatise Ars cantus figurati (CoussemakerS, iv, 421–33) is a compilation on musica mensurabilis according to the theories of Johannes de Muris; it deals with ligatures, alterations, proportions and prolations, giving diagrams and music examples. The work is discussed in A.M. Busse Berger: ...

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Albert Seay and David Fallows

(fl1400–32). Italian composer. The only secure facts of his life are that he was ‘magister cantus’ at S Marco, Venice, on 3 March 1420 and was listed in a notarial act of 20 July 1425 as a ‘cantor S Marci’. The text of his motet, ...

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Antony  

Shana Goldin-Perschbacher

(b Chichester, England, 1971). American singer-songwriter and pianist. After the Hegarty family moved to San Jose, Ccalifornia, in 1981, Antony studied experimental theater at New York University, formed a performance collective with Johanna Constantine, and collaborated with filmmaker William Basinski (Life on Mars, ...

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Barbara B. Heyman

Opera in three acts, op.40, by samuel Barber to a libretto by franco Zeffirelli after william Shakespear ’s play; New York, Metropolitan Opera, 16 September 1966.

Commissioned for the opening of the new opera house at Lincoln Center, the original version of Antony and Cleopatra...

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Michaela Freemanová and Geoffrey Chew

(fl 1760–1806). Czech composer. He was a teacher in Nemyčeves near Jičín (1760–92), then in Kopidlno. Most of his work output consists of church music, but he also wrote the Opera de rebellione boëmica rusticorum, which deals with the great peasant rebellion in East Bohemia of 1775. The work seems to have gained popularity in its time: it appears in several musical collections, and also as a spoken drama. The opera is composed in a late Baroque idiom, with Rococo features; to highlight the contrast between the lives of peasants and the nobility, it uses elements of folk and art music.

J. Němeček: Lidové zpěvohry a písně z doby roboty [Folk Singspiels and songs from the time of serfdom] (Prague, 1954)T. Volek: ‘První české zpěvohry’ [The first Czech Singspiels], Dějiny českého divadla [History of Czech theatre], vol.1: Od počátku do sklonku osmnáctého století [From the Beginning to the end of the 18th century], ed. ...

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Gerhard Conrad

(b Pforzheim, Germany, Oct 6, 1929). German soprano, tenor, and bass saxophonist. After receiving three lessons on guitar from a member of the Reinhardt clan he played in dance bands until 1950. He then contacted Sidney Bechet in Paris and learned to play soprano saxophone. He played in Germany with the arranger and bandleader Ernst Simon and also with American soldiers. In ...

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Antunes  

John Koster and Gerhard Doderer

Portuguese family of harpsichord and piano makers . Manuel Antunes (1707–96) and Joaquim José Antunes (1731–1811), the only children of Julião Antunes, a maker of string instruments who served in the royal chapel, shared a workshop in Lisbon. Two harpsichords, dated 1758...

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Gerard Béhague

(b Rio de Janeiro, April 23, 1942). Brazilian composer. He studied the violin, conducting and composition at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro with Carlos de Almeida, Morelenbaum, Siqueira and de Carvalho (1958–68), as well as composition with Guerra-Peixe. He also took the BSc in physics (...

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Antwerp  

Godelieve Spiessens

City in Belgium. For centuries it has been an important musical centre and has played a leading role in the music of the Low Countries. Around 1410 the choir school of the church of Our Lady (Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekerk; later the cathedral) began to develop an active musical life. Up to the 17th century its choirmasters, organists and singers included such composers as Pullois, Ockeghem, Barbireau, Obrecht, Waelrant, Gérard de Turnhout, Séverin Cornet, Pevernage, Opitiis and John Bull; in addition Rore, Lassus and Monte all spent some time in the city. Secular music was promoted by the establishment of the town players (before ...