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Article

Amanda Villepastour

[àpẹ̀ṣì]

Set of three single-headed, footed drums of the Yorùbá people of Nigeria. Pegs tension and tune the skins and the ensemble (used by the Ifá divination cult) is accompanied by a bell (agogo). In the Ẹdẹ area this set consists of ìpẹ̀sẹ̀ or agbagbule (the conical, principal drum), ...

Article

Isanj  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Lamellaphone of the Akwa-Sonjo people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Usually it has eight metal tongues mounted on a hard, flat wooden board measuring about 20 by 13 cm. Almost always a little iron bar with rattling rings is affixed on the front. A calabash on a stick is sometimes affixed to the soundboard as a resonator. ...

Article

Kabile  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Mirliton of the Mbae people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is made from a hollow stem (about 30 cm long) of the umbrella tree, one end of which is covered with a dried leaf or a thick spider web. The other end is left open. The player sings or shouts into a lateral hole. Used in connection with initiation rituals, it is said to produce the voice of the spirit Kabile. (...

Article

Kabwaye  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Double bell of the Makere people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The handle is usually wrapped in rattan or raffia fibres to strengthen it and prevent the clapperless iron bells from touching each other, and to prevent the vibrations of one bell being transmitted to the other.

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Article

Kazagi  

K.A. Gourlay

revised by Amanda Villepastour

Open single-headed hourglass drum of fixed pitch, of the Hausa and Bolewa people of Nigeria. The body (kango), approximately 22 cm long, 14 cm in diameter at the ends, and 9 cm in diameter at the waist, is carved from k’irya wood, with a head of gazelle skin laced on; the head has a snare (zaga). The drum is either suspended upright from the player’s neck at hip level and played with two beaters (’ya’yan kazagi) made from wire wrapped in cloth and bound with leather, or hung obliquely across the left shoulder and beaten with a hooked stick (maka’di). Its main function is as supporting instrument to cylindrical drums such as the ganga, gangan noma, or dundufa in accompanying girls’ dancing, the performance of praise songs for farmers, and among the Maguzawa (non-Muslim Hausa) at marriages, feasts, and other ceremonies.

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Article

Kengele  

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Keo  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

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Keriten  

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Kesangi  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Lamellaphone of the Tetela people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Its eight metal tongues are affixed to a flat board by means of three iron cross-bars. Unusually here, the ends of the bar over which the tongues pass before vibrating are bent at a right angle towards the player. ...

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Kiana  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

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Kibinjj  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Lamellaphone of the Pende and Lunda peoples of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has a variable number of wooden tongues and a raft-type base made of three pieces of wood nailed together. It is also known as kakolondd by the Tshokwe, but in this case the middle part of the raft is shorter than the outer pieces. Another Pende type, known more specifically as ...

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Single-bar xylophone of the Luba people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The bar (made of Garcinia huillensis or Ptereocarpii, both very hard woods) hangs over a calabash resonator from cords suspended from two curved sticks held to the calabash with wax. The beater is a wooden stick ending in a rubber ball. The name is also given to similar xylophones with two bars. The root -...

Article

Kigwara  

Peter Cooke

Vessel flute of the Gwere people of eastern Uganda. It is made from the dry oncoba fruit or the tip of a gourd. It usually has two fingerholes (covered by the index fingers) and a third hole for the embouchure. It is played with accompaniment of a percussion beam for a ritual that encourages edible white ants to emerge from the ground for harvesting. Similar instruments are known as ...

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Kikwara  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

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Kilimba  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Lamellaphone of the Sampwe people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Its box resonator (about 25 by 15 by 3.5 cm in one specimen) is slightly shallower than the usual size and can bear up to 20 metal tongues. Similar instruments, often differently named, are used by the Holo, Pende, Bakwa Songo, and Tshokwe peoples. (F.J. de Hen: ...

Article

Kiluka  

Peter Cooke

End-blown conical flute of Uganda. It is made from the end of a gourd about 9 cm long. One fingerhole is cut halfway or slightly nearer to the closed distal end. It can produce several notes through a combination of stopping the hole and changing the angle of the player’s lips against the wider end, which is cut to a curve forming the embouchure. It is called ...

Article

Kimbi  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen