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Article

Timothy M. Crain

Performing rights organization. It represents songwriters and publishers and their right to be compensated for having their music performed in public. With headquarters in Nashville and offices in New York, Los Angeles, Atlanta, Miami, and London, it is the smallest of the main Performing rights societies in the United States. Unlike the not-for-profit organizations ASCAP and BMI, which distribute all income from performance royalties to their composer and publisher affiliates (minus an administrative fee), SESAC retains a certain amount of the performance royalties from its members. Moreover, membership in SESAC is selective and only granted through an application process. Once admitted, musicians and publishers are paid royalties based upon how much their music is played through monitoring by computer database information and broadcast logs.

SESAC was founded in 1930 by Paul Heinecke, a German immigrant to the United States. Heinecke lead the company until his death in 1972. The original name of the company was the Society of European Stage Authors and Composers, although it has subsequently gone simply by SESAC. The society originally strove to support under-represented European stage authors and composers with their American performance royalties. With an established base repertoire of European concert traditions, it turned its attention to American music traditions in the 1930s, including gospel and Christian music genres and eventually moved into mainstream popular musics during the 1940s, 50s, and 60s. Since the 1960s the company has represented an ever-growing range of writers and genres, including notables such as Bob Dylan and Neil Diamond. In ...

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Concert venue and gallery, focusing at first on visual art, but soon becoming one of the key locations in the Czech Republic for contemporary and improvised music, sound art, and intermedia work.

Housed in the courtyard of an 1888 neo-Renaissance building in the centre of Prague, the former galvanizing workshop was reconstructed in 1999 by the Linhart Foundation and opened to the public in 2000.

The gallery has offered a regular programme of two monthly concerts, always featuring a local act opening for a foreign guest. Performers have included Thomas Lehn, Franz Hautzinger, Dieb13, and Jim Denley, as well as most musicians on the Czech improvised music scene, and many composer-performers, including Peter Graham, Lucie Vítková, and Miro Tóth[1]. Artists working with sound at the gallery in an installation context have included Jacob Kirkegaard, Phill Niblock, Peter Cusack, and John Grzinich.

Apart from regular exhibitions and concerts, the gallery has also organized long-term residencies for artists, artistic workshops, and discussions. Since ...

Article

[SIAE]

Italian organization, founded in 1964 to encourage musicology and stimulate the development and diffusion of musical culture. It encourages research through meetings and publishing activities. Its presidents have included Guglielmo Barblan (1964), Claudio Gallico (1968), Alberto Basso (1973) and Agostino Ziino. It has held congresses in Parma (...

Article

(Flem. Belgische Vereniging voor Muziekwetenschap). Belgian organization, founded in 1946 by Charles van den Borren, Suzanne Clercx-Lejeune and Albert Vander Linden to bring together musicologists and promote musicological research in Belgium. After van den Borren died in 1966 the society's activities were limited and resumed only in 1974; the following year Vander Linden became president, succeeded in ...

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An organization founded in Paris by Lionel de La Laurencie in 1917 to encourage musicological study in France and abroad. In addition to established scholars its membership (about 350 in 1995) includes students, performers and amateurs. Presidents have included the most distinguished French musicologists, among them Saint-Foix, Masson, Pincherle, Dufourcq, Thibault, Lesure and Bridgman. The society's journal ...

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Article

Martin Hatch

The Society for Asian Music (SAM) was formed in 1959–60 in close association with the Asia Society. Prominent among its organizers were Paul Sherbert (president of the Asia Society), Willard Rhodes, professor of music at Columbia University (chairman of the board of SAM), and Henry Cowell, composer (president of SAM). At the society’s first public meeting, on 27 March 1960, more than 100 members enrolled. The stated purposes of the society were to “encourage and cultivate a greater understanding and knowledge of Asian music in the United States by means of lectures, discussions, concerts and recordings, and to make available in the United States authoritative books, articles, films, musical scores and similar materials” (EthM, v/1, 1961, 71–2). The initial performance sponsored by the society was the United States debut of Ravi Shankar. Subsequent to that, volunteer SAM members and Asia Society staff produced a series of monthly performances and lectures on Asian performing arts of such prominent Asian artists and scholars as Ali Akbar Khan, Chatur Lal, Kishibe Shigeo, T. Viswanathan, and ...

Article

Patrick McCreless

[SMT]

Professional organization devoted to music theory as a scholarly and pedagogical discipline. Most of its members are teachers of music theory in North American higher educational institutions, with a small percentage of foreign members. Publications include Music Theory Spectrum (1979–), Music Theory Online (1993–), and the SMT Newsletter.

The Society was founded on 19 October 1977 at a meeting of 275 scholars at Northwestern University. (By 2009 there were 1100 members.) This second national meeting of theorists (the first having convened in Boston in 1976) formally recognized music theory as an independent scholarly discipline. The impetus toward the formation of a national society emerged out of a grassroots movement of theory teachers who viewed the theory teaching of the time as generally inadequate (theory courses were often taught by composers or performers for whom theory was a secondary interest) and who viewed theory-based musical analysis as an academic discipline in its own right. A number of PhD programs in music theory (notably at the Eastman School of Music, Yale University, Indiana University, and the University of Michigan) or composition and theory (Princeton University) had been established in the decades prior to the founding of the Society, as had two influential journals—the ...

Article

(Jap. Tōyō Ongaku-gakkai)

Society founded in 1936 by Hisao Tanabe, Kenzō Hayashi, Shigeo Kishibe and others. Its objective is systematic research in Asian music, including Japanese, and the promotion of musicological activities in Japan. Its membership in 1995 was about 740. Since its foundation, the society has issued a yearly journal, Tōyō Ongaku Kenkyū...

Article

[SPNM]

British organization founded in 1943 by Francis Chagrin to support the work of young and unestablished composers. It was launched at a meeting of the Arrangers', Composers' and Copyists' subcommittee of the Musicians' Union, and was originally named the Committee for the Promotion of New Music. Vaughan Williams accepted the presidency with the proviso that it ‘avoid all cliques [and] give a welcome to all good work in whatever style or school’. Its initial activities, which were subsidized by the wartime Council for the Encouragement of Music and the Arts and by private donations from Vaughan Williams, Bliss and others, remained the basis for much of its subsequent work: ‘recommended lists’ of works were drawn up, which resulted in increased broadcasting by the BBC and in a recording project by Decca; ‘studio recitals’ were given, which included chaired discussions of the music; ‘Experimental Orchestral Rehearsals’ were established. All the music was chosen by expert reading panels....

Article

Eldonna L. May

[SBC]

African American composers collective, established in 1968 and dissolved in 1973. Believing that black music was a catalyst for social change and community coalition building, an eclectic, politically active, visionary group of young composers came together in New York in 1968 to found the Society of Black Composers. Their agenda was tripartite: to develop their composition skills, to promote the work of black modern and classical composers, and to enrich the cultural life of black communities. In addition to supporting the work of African American composers, the collective sought to increase musical, political, and cultural awareness. It presented concerts, colloquia, and lectures to perform and discuss the music of its members. The society also broadened the scope of contemporary musical composition by incorporating elements of other cultural traditions.

The society’s members hailed from diverse musical backgrounds, ranging from jazz to classical to avant-garde, and included Talib Rasul Hakim (Stephen Chambers), William Fischer, Carman Moore, Dorothy Rudd Moore, John Price, Alvin Singleton, Roger Dickerson, Primous Fountain, James Furman, Adolphus Hailstork, Wendell Logan, and Olly Wilson. Support from the Ford, Fulbright, Guggenheim, and Whitney foundations, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the National Endowment for the Humanities enabled members to study and perform in Europe and Africa....

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British organization. It was founded in London in 1905 under the chairmanship of Frederick Corder to assist the publication of works by British composers. Within two years it had a membership of 254 composers and others and had published 44 works, chiefly songs and chamber music in its Avison Edition, which was first published by Breitkopf & Härtel, then by Novello and finally, from ...

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British organization. It was founded in London in 1834 to encourage British music and to try to secure for British musicians a position similar to that conferred on painters and sculptors by the Royal Academy. It offered membership only to musicians of British birth and originally excluded all but British music from its concerts. At first the society was extremely successful, and by ...

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Rita H. Mead

Organization founded in New York in 1966 as the American Society of University Composers by Donald Martino, J.K. Randall, Claudio Spies, Henry Weinberg, Peter Westergaard, Charles Wuorinen and Benjamin Boretz. Each year it holds one national and seven regional conferences at which members’ music is performed. The society also publishes the ...

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Christopher E. Mehrens

Organization founded in New York in 1966 as the American Society of University Composers by Donald Martino, J.K. Randall, Claudio Spies, Henry Weinberg, Peter Westergaard, Charles Wuorinen, and Benjamin Boretz. Its mission was to further the cause of contemporary American music by providing opportunities for performing, recording, and publishing compositions by its members. In 1986 the organization's name was changed to the Society of Composers, Inc. (SCI) to reflect the demography of the organization. Each year the society hosts a national and several regional conferences for which members are invited to submit compositions and proposals for papers, sound installations, and panel discussions. It also sponsors, with the assistance of the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP), an annual Student Commission Competition and the annual SCI National Student Conference, which is a “major festival of works by young composers.” The society publishes the 29-volume Journal of Music Scores, a growing CD recording series (30 volumes as of ...

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British society, founded in 1929 by J. Bernard McElligott to foster knowledge and understanding of music in the liturgy of the Roman Catholic Church, to improve the standards of performance and to stimulate debate. Its membership includes clergy, composers and church musicians, mainly in Great Britain, but also in the USA and elsewhere; numerous distinguished Roman Catholic musicians have been involved with its work, including Henry Washington and A. Gregory Murray. The latter edited the society's journal Music and Liturgy (renamed Liturgy in 1944; Life and Worship, 1970–74) from 1929 to 1952. In 1955 the Church Music Association, a breakaway group, published its own journal Church Music (from 1959); in 1975 the two bodies were reunited and their journals amalgamated under the original title. Since the Second Vatican Council the Society's work has been concentrated on the implementation of its decrees; summer schools have been instituted, and composers' groups have been formed, to this end....

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Sophie Fuller

British organization. Founded in 1911 by the singer Gertrude Eaton, the composer Katharine Eggar and the musicologist Marion M. Scott, it aimed to provide a focal point for women composers and performers to meet and enjoy the benefits of mutual cooperation. The 37 women at the inaugural meeting included musicians such as Ethel Barns, Rebecca Clarke, Agnes Larkcom, Anne Mukle and her sister, May Mukle, and Liza Lehmann, who became the society’s first president. Later presidents included Cécile Chaminade, Fanny Davies, Rosa Newmarch, Myra Hess, Astra Desmond and Elizabeth Poston. Early members included Florence Marshall, Maude Valérie White and Ethel Smyth, who was honorary vice-president from 1925 to 1944. Among subsequent honorary vice-presidents were Nadia Boulanger, Imogen Holst, Elisabeth Lutyens, Elizabeth Maconchy and Fanny Waterman. By the end of its first year the society had formed a choir and a library, given several private concerts and a public concert of members’ works (which included the première of the first two movements of Smyth’s String Quartet in E minor), hosted a variety of lectures, held a composers’ conference and attracted 152 female members and 20 male associates, including Thomas Dunhill and W.W. Cobbett, who donated the Cobbett Free Library of Chamber Music to the Society in ...