3,001-3,020 of 3,169 results  for:

  • Music Educator x
Clear all

Article

William Duckworth

revised by Michael Meckna

(Everett)

(b Cleveland, TN, July 16, 1930; d New York, July 1, 1982). American composer and synthesizer player. He studied at the universities of Tennessee (BA 1949), Colorado (MM 1953), Illinois (1955–6), Cornell (1958–60) and at UCLA (1961–2); his principal teachers were John Krueger, David Van Vactor, Cecil Effinger, Burrill Phillips, Robert Palmer and Roy Harris. From 1967 he was a member of the faculty at the New School for Social Research in New York, where he founded (1969) and directed the electronic music programme. He was also the founder and director of the Composers Theatre (1964–82), an organization that presented the works of some 250 American composers in various concert series, including over 150 premières and more than 50 commissioned works.

Watts composed more than 100 works for concert, theatre, dance, film and television. After 1964...

Article

Paula Morgan

(b Patton, PA, April 2, 1927). American liturgiologist . He took two BA degrees at St Vincent College (1949 and 1952) and the MS in piano at the Juilliard School (1954), and then took further graduate courses at Columbia University. From 1957 to 1967 he was associated with St Vincent College, first as a music teacher and later in administrative positions, including those of chancellor and chairman of the board of directors. He was a member of the university seminar in medieval studies at Columbia, 1957–66. In 1967 he was appointed abbot primate of the Benedictine Confederation and in 1977 he became the Archbishop of Milwaukee. He was also music editor of the New Catholic Encyclopedia. His principal interests are medieval Latin drama and music theorists, and Ambrosian chant. He studied the compositions and theoretical writings of Hucbald, and his transcription of the Play of Daniel...

Article

Alan L. Spurgeon

(b New London, CT, March 13, 1853; d Westfield, MA, April 20, 1904). American music educator. Weaver attended singing schools and studied at the New England Conservatory (1879–80, 1890–91) and in Germany. He taught in singing schools and began teaching public school music in Torrington, Connecticut (1878), and then taught in several other schools in Connecticut and Massachusetts. He developed a unique teaching methodology that relied only on the blackboard and his own singing voice. The goal was individual musical literacy through sight singing. An early advocate of a scientific approach to music teaching, he related each tone and rhythm systematically to tones and rhythms previously learned, and then tested the results. Weaver called his method “time motions,” rhythm patterns for sight singing melodies presented sequentially. He published a book of sight singing materials, Individual Sight Singing (1900). Weaver taught music supervisors in popular summer schools at his home in Westfield, Massachusetts (...

Article

William E. Boswell

(b nr Salisbury, June 24, 1803; d Orange, NJ, Oct 7, 1887). American music educator, editor and composer of English birth . He studied with Alexander Lucas in Salisbury, then resigned as organist at Falmouth in 1830 and emigrated to Boston, Massachusetts, where he became organist at the Old South Church. Active in many aspects of Boston's musical life, he worked closely with Lowell Mason on educational and publishing projects. He taught in the early years of the Boston Academy of Music, was conductor of the Handel and Haydn Society and the orchestras of the Academy and the Musical Fund Society, and co-edited periodicals and choral collections with Mason and others. In 1870 he moved to Orange, New Jersey, and taught in New York. His compositions, most of which are choral, are musically adept and very much a part of the New England Protestant tradition, though notably less inspired than those of Mason. Only one hymn tune remains in use today: originally written to secular words, it was by ...

Article

[Dionys]

(b Velichov, nr Karlovy Vary, Oct 9, 1766; d Prague, Dec 25, 1842). Bohemian composer and teacher. He first had music lessons in his home town with F. Beier. He continued his education at the Gymnasium in nearby Doupov and went to the Klementinum seminary in Prague to study theology, philosophy and law, before turning his attention permanently to music. In 1792 he studied with the Abbé Vogler, and was soon renowned in Prague society as an effective teacher and an excellent pianist. During the late 1790s he gained much local success composing dance and salon pieces for piano and for orchestra; his standing was also enhanced by a number of more substantial works, notably the large patriotic cantata Böhmens Errettung, written for the 1797 birthday celebrations of Emperor Francis II. By 1800 Weber occupied a leading role in Prague musical life. He was involved in the formation of the Verein zur Beförderung der Tonkunst in Böhmen (...

Article

Klaus L. Neumann

(b Nuremberg, Oct 13, 1891; d Essen-Werden, June 30, 1947). German composer and teacher. To a large extent self-taught, he was a primary school teacher in Nuremberg from 1912. With the help of Wilhelm Widmann and Anton Hardörfer, he engaged in the study of old music, but eventually became involved in the German youth music movement, which had a lasting influence on his career. He was appointed to a post in Münster in 1925, and then joined the staff of the Essen Folkwangschule in 1927. His best-known composition is Christgeburt, a chamber piece based on old folksongs and incorporating acting, singing and dancing; it has been much performed by the Folkwangschule. In 1949 a Ludwig Weber Society was formed to publish the large quantity of manuscripts he left.

(selective list)

Principal publisher: Kallmeyer/Möseler

Article

Jere T. Humphreys

(b Augusta, ME, May 31, 1947). American music educator and scholar. He earned degrees in music education from the University of Southern Maine (BS 1969) and the Eastman School of Music (MM 1971, PhD 1977). He taught music in the public schools of Maine (1965–9), Massachusetts (1969–70), and New York (1970–74), and at Case Western Reserve University (1974–88). Since moving to Northwestern University in 1988 he has taught philosophy, graduate research methods, music technology, assessment, and creative thinking in music; advised numerous dissertations; and served as chair of the music education program, chair of the Department of Music Studies, and associate dean of the Bienen School of Music. Webster has published over 70 articles and book chapters on technology, music cognition, and creative thinking in music, works that have appeared in journals and handbooks in and outside of music. He is co-author (with David Williams) of ...

Article

Harold E. Samuel

(b Nuremberg, bap. April 2, 1632; d Nuremberg, April 20, 1695). German organist, composer and teacher. After lessons with his father, Johann, a ‘gold spinner’, he developed so successfully under Kindermann that ‘at the age of 16 he was allowed to play the clavier in the churches’ (Doppelmayr). He was employed throughout his career as an organist in Nuremberg: from the age of 19 at St Walpurg, from three years later (1654) at the Frauenkirche, from 1658 to 1686 at Egidienkirche and from 1686 until his death at the parish church, St Sebaldus, where his successor was Johann Pachelbel.

Wecker and the somewhat older Heinrich Schwemmer are important in the 17th-century teacher–pupil tradition of the Nuremberg school, stemming from Johann Staden through his pupil Kindermann to Schwemmer and Wecker and on to their pupils of the fourth generation, Nikolaus Deinl, J.B. Schütz, Maximilian Zeidler, Johann Krieger and Pachelbel. From Schwemmer they learnt singing and the rudiments of music, after which Wecker taught them keyboard instruments and composition. Other pupils of Wecker were Johann Löhner, the printer W.M. Endter, C.F. Witt and Nicolaus Vetter. Wecker clearly earned a measure of fame as an organist, for Printz (...

Article

(b Basle, 1528; d Colmar, 1586). Swiss lutenist, intabulator, physician and university teacher. He matriculated at Basle University in 1543 and at Wittenberg University in May 1544, returning to Basle University in 1546. Here he befriended Christoph Piperinus, teacher of Basilius Amerbach, and the lutenists Johannes von Schallen and Thiebold Schoenauer, teachers of Felix Platter. In about 1550 Wecker travelled to Italy, presumably to complete his medical studies, and may have found his way into the intellectual circle surrounding the physician and theorist Girolamo Cardano. In 1552, at the behest of his friends, Wecker published a collection of lute duets that he had ‘recently brought back from Italy’, in the Lautenbuch vonn mancherley schönen und lieblichen Stucken (Basle, 1552). Platter reported playing from this book while studying medicine in Montpellier and also performed in Strasbourg in 1556 with a ‘good lutenist’ named ‘Wolf’. In that year, 20 of Wecker’s duets had been published by Wolff Heckel under a nearly identical title (...

Article

Paula Morgan

(b Springfield, MO, May 9, 1917; d Ann Arbor, June 3, 1988). American music bibliographer. He graduated from the University of Michigan (BM 1949, MM 1950, PhD 1956) and was on the faculty of its School of Music from 1952 until his retirement in 1982; in 1967...

Article

Barbara Palfy

(b Lincoln, NE, July 22, 1901; d New York, July 15, 1975). American dancer, choreographer, and teacher. Weidman studied dance as a youth locally and then with former Ballets Russes dancer Theodore Kosloff, going on to Denishawn in California to finish his training and to perform with the company for six years. In 1928 a number of the dancers rebelled against the exotica they were performing and left to find new ways of moving, becoming the pioneers of what would be called modern dance. With fellow dancer Doris Humphrey the Humphrey-Weidman Company was formed in New York, lasting until 1945 as a major troupe of the era.

While the innovative movement vocabulary they presented was primarily Humphrey’s contribution, Weidman developed an approach to dancemaking that he called “kinetic pantomime”: starting with an everyday gesture and letting it spool out improvisationally. Always an arresting presence on the stage, he created solos and group works that were full of characterization. His sensibilities were attuned to all shades of life, expressed in works that could be scathing as in his statement against bigotry in ...

Article

Rosario Marciano

[Valerie]

(b Vienna, Sept 11, 1889; d New York, Dec 25, 1982). American music therapist, composer and teacher, of Austrian birth. She studied the piano in Vienna with Richard Robert and, at Vienna University, musicology with Guido Adler and composition with Karl Weigl, whom she later married. She taught for a period as Robert’s assistant and also worked with Karl Weigl at the Musicological Institute of Vienna University. In 1938 she and her husband moved to New York, where she continued to compose and perform and took up teaching appointments at the Institute for Avocational Music and the American Theater Wing. After receiving the Master’s degree from Columbia University in 1955, she pursued a lifelong interest in music therapy by becoming chief music therapist at the New York Medical College. She contributed many papers to music therapy literature and lectured widely in the USA and abroad. In addition she devoted much of her time to the preservation of the considerable musical legacy of Karl Weigl, a portion of whose output, though well known in Europe, had not yet been introduced to the USA. In ...

Article

William Osborne

(b Livingstone Town[ship], Columbia County, NY, June 2, 1839; d San Francisco, CA, April 14, 1921). American composer, teacher, and critic of German-Jewish parentage. Weil was first educated at a private school in Albany and later studied in Leipzig and Paris. His New York début on 21 May 1863 was conducted by Theodore Thomas. In 1868 Weil settled in San Francisco, where some of his compositions were published as early as 1874. He co-founded the San Francisco Institute of Music and organized the city’s first series of chamber music concerts. He also became general director of the Bush Street Theater, but left in 1881; he settled for a period in Boston, where for four years he served as music director of the Bostonians. He returned to San Francisco in 1898 to teach and write music criticism for the Argonaut.

Many of his works remain unpublished, including some of significant proportions. He wrote solo songs on both English and German lyrics, partsongs, a set of seven vocal waltzes issued by Breitkopf und Härtel in ...

Article

John S. Weissmann

revised by Melinda Berlász

(b Budapest, April 16, 1885; d Budapest, Sept 13, 1960). Hungarian composer and teacher. In 1901 he entered the Buda Music Academy, where until 1906 he was a pupil of Koessler. He won the Liszt stipend (1906), the Volkmann and Erkel prizes for the Serenade op.3, the Haynald Prize for his chorus Agnus Dei, and the Schunda Prize for the Magyar ábránd (‘Hungarian Fantasy’) for tárogató and cimbalom. Weiner worked as répétiteur at the Pest People’s Theatre (1907–8), and then the Franz Josef Coronation Prize enabled him to visit Vienna, Munich, Berlin and Paris. In 1908 he was appointed to teach theory at the Buda Academy, serving as professor of composition (1912–22) and of chamber music (1920–57). His work in the latter faculty attracted international notice and helped to establish high standards in Hungarian ensemble playing; his legacy as a teacher left its mark on a generation of musicians that included Dorati and Solti. At the academy he established a conductorless orchestra of advanced students (...

Article

John Warrack

revised by James Deaville

(b Dresden, July 25, 1780; d Leipzig, March 7, 1842). German Kantor, composer and teacher . He was the nephew of Christian Ehregott Weinlig (b Dresden, 30 Sept 1743; d Dresden, 14 March 1813), who was an organist in Leipzig (1767–73), a renowned Kantor at the Dresden Kreuzschule from 1785 and a composer of sacred and instrumental music. He first studied and practised law (1797–1803), then took music lessons (especially in composition) with his uncle (1804–6) and with Stanislao Mattei in Bologna (1806). He was Kantor of the Kreuzschule from 1814 to 1817, and in 1823 moved from Dresden to succeed Schicht as Kantor of the Thomaskirche in Leipzig: Weber’s letter of recommendation for this position described him as deeply devoted to his art and gifted with profound insight. In Leipzig Weinlig set himself to maintain the great tradition of the Thomaskirche and raised the standard of performance to a high level. Among others, Mendelssohn praised his activity at the Thomaskirche, where Weinlig remained until his death. A learned and conscientious teacher, he numbered among his pupils Clara Schumann, E.F.E. Richter and Richard Wagner. Though Wagner studied with Weinlig for only about six months (beginning about ...

Article

Ian Carson

(Constance )

(b Martinborough, NZ, Jan 17, 1941). British organist and teacher . Her early training was as a pianist. She studied the piano with Cyril Smith and the organ with Ralph Downes at the RCM. Additional studies were with Anton Heiller, Marie-Claire Alain and Nadia Boulanger. She won the St Albans International Organ Festival Competition in 1964 with a performance of Messiaen’s Combat de la mort et de la vie. Engagements followed when she was still a student at the RCM, and she made her début recital at the Royal Festival Hall in 1965; three months later she was the soloist in a televised performance of Poulenc’s Organ Concerto on the opening night of the Proms. She has received many awards and honours, and was the first woman to be elected to the Council of the Royal College of Organists (1977), the first musician to receive the Turnovsky Foundation award for an outstanding contribution to the arts (...

Article

(b Göttingen, May 3, 1744; d Rotenburg an der Fulda, July 26, 1826). German physician and composer . He took his medical degree at Göttingen, where he established a practice and also lectured in botany at the university. Bürger and the members of the Göttinger Hainbund admired his musical talents and often asked him to set their poetry to music. He published three collections of Lieder mit Melodien (Lübeck and Leipzig, 1775–9), a further 16 lieder in the Göttinger Musenalmanach (1773–85), 11 in Voss’s Musenalmanach (1776–8) and others in various anthologies. Strophic form predominates in these works, and several have attractive melodies, though there are frequent inept progressions in the accompaniments. Weis also published two volumes of Charakteristische englische Tänze (Lübeck, 1777–8). In 1786 he was appointed privy councillor and physician in ordinary to the Count of Hessen-Rotenburg, after which his interest in music seems to have ceased....

Article

Karl-Ernst Bergunder

(b Gebesee, Thuringia, c1575; d c1640). German composer, schoolmaster and clergyman. He may have known, or been taught by, Friedrich Weissensee, who became Rektor of the Lateinschule at Gebesee in 1590. He registered at Erfurt University in 1591 and at Jena University in 1599. In 1614 he still described himself as a student of theology and music, but he had meanwhile become a musician, probably an organist, at the parish church at Gebesee and then, in 1612, Kantor at the Marienkirche at Mühlhausen and a teacher at the Gymnasium there. Between 1613 and 1621 he was several times in trouble with the authorities, for neglect of his duties, drunkenness and impertinence towards the superintendent. In 1621 he was nevertheless able to begin a new career, as a clergyman at Bockelnhagen and Zwinge, near Leinefelde, Thuringia, and he presumably remained there until his death. His three surviving compositions, which show that he was a composer of only average craftsmanship, all date from his years at Mühlhausen. The most interesting is ...

Article

William Waterhouse

(b Friedrichs-Tanneck, Thuringia, April 13, 1837; d Leipzig, April 21, 1888). German bassoonist and teacher . He was leading bassoonist in the Leipzig Gewandhaus orchestra from 1857 to 1887. From 1882 until his death he was professor at the Leipzig Conservatory, the first teacher of bassoon to be appointed. Though he composed orchestral and choral works, he is remembered for the excellent teaching material, still in print and widely used, that he wrote for the bassoon. This comprises a tutor for the improved Heckel model bassoon of ...

Article

Dieter Härtwig

(b Schwerstedt, Thuringia, c1560; d Altenweddingen, nr Magdeburg, 1622). German composer, schoolmaster and clergyman. From 1590 he was Rektor of the grammar school at Gebesee, near Erfurt. In about 1596 he succeeded Leonhard Schroeter (who retired in 1595) as Kantor of the notable grammar school at Magdeburg, an important appointment in which two of his recent predecessors had been Martin Agricola and Gallus Dressler. One of his most noteworthy pupils there was Daniel Friderici. In 1602 he became a clergyman at Altenweddingen. He ranks beside such men as Christoph Demantius, Michael Praetorius and Melchior Vulpius as one of the leading German composers of Protestant church music of his day. His principal publication is the Opus melicum (1602), which contains 72 Latin and German motets for four to 12 voices with instruments (one of the Latin motets is by Marenzio). These works show that he was one of the best German exponents of the massive Venetian choral style of Willaert and the Gabrielis. His volumes of ...