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Margaret Laurie and Curtis Price

[ Pierre Antoine ]

( b Rouen, Feb 25, 1663; d London, Feb 18, 1718). English writer and playwright of French birth. A Huguenot refugee, he came to London in 1685 and was naturalized a year later. His literary career began with the publication of the Gentleman's Journal (1692–4), a monthly magazine catering for a wide range of tastes, which included both comments on music and a music supplement, and which he edited and partly wrote (with unacknowledged borrowings from the Mercure de France). In this periodical Motteux offered the classic apologia for semi-opera: ‘Other Nations bestow the name of Opera only on such Plays whereof every word is sung. But experience hath taught us that our English genius will not rellish that perpetual Singing’. His dramatic works include a number of masques and musical interludes: possibly The Rape of Europa (performed with an adaptation of Fletcher's Valentinian, 1694), certainly ...

Article

Ivan Čavlović

(b Tuzla, Sept 14, 1942). Bosnian-Herzegovinian composer, editor, and music critic. Nuić graduated from the Primary and Secondary Music School in Tuzla. She then graduated from the Academy of Music in Sarajevo, in the Department for Music Theory and Pedagogy; afterwards she studied composition with Miroslav Špiler.

She worked as music editor at Radio Sarajevo (1971–92) and at Radio Federacije Bosne I Hercegovine (1994–2007).

Initially engaged in radiophonic composition, Nuić has more recently turned to pieces for traditional instrumentation. Additionally, she is an author of music for numerous radio shows, TV films and educational shows, theatrical plays, and four short films. Nuić is also the composer of the ballet Prizivanje Peruna, choreographed by D. Boldin (première 21 May 1988), and one of the most often performed ballets at the National Theatre in Sarajevo.

Nuić has also written extensively for newspapers and magazines such as ...

Article

William Osborne

(b Fair Haven, CT, Feb 7, 1857; d Pasadena, CA, Nov 28, 1940). American organist, composer, teacher, music publisher, and music critic. Rogers studied with organ virtuoso Clarence Eddy in Chicago, followed by further study in Berlin and Paris, 1875–82. He worked for a year in Burlington, Iowa, before establishing himself in Cleveland as an organist of various churches, as well as the Euclid Avenue Temple, which he served for 50 years. He was a prolific composer, a teacher at the Cleveland School of Music, a critic at the Cleveland Plain Dealer (1915–32), and a publisher of his own works and those of others. He wrote about 550 pieces, and his more than 130 songs (issued between 1878 and 1933), organ pieces, and church music were widely performed in their time. For the organ he left three sonatas, two sonatinas, three suites, and many one-movement genre pieces. He also wrote secular partsongs, cantatas for both Christmas and Easter, several settings of the Latin Mass, and both a ...

Article

W.H. Husk

revised by Bruce Carr

(b London, March 20, 1804; d Bexley, Kent, March 8, 1881). English organist and writer on music. In 1834 he became organist of St Mary’s (Roman Catholic) Chapel, Chelsea, and composed some masses for its service. Between 1840 and 1860 he published many instruction books for organ, reed organ, concertina and church singing.

Warren was a careful and thorough editor of earlier English music: his edition of Boyce’s Cathedral Music, for example, included new biographies of the composers with exhaustive lists of their works. Such scholarship was facilitated by the large and valuable library he collected during his life, including the partbooks from which he edited Hilton’s Ayres or Fa Las, many unique sale catalogues, and autograph manuscripts of Purcell, A. Scarlatti, Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. The fruits of his research appeared often in the early Musical World.