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Matthew Greenall

(b London, Sept 24, 1945). English composer, conductor and editor. He was a chorister at Highgate School, following which he studied music at Clare College, Cambridge. He then taught at the University of Southampton, returning to Clare College as the director of music in 1975. In 1979 he left to devote himself to composition and subsequently to found the Cambridge Singers, a professional choir with whom he has made many recordings, both of his own music and of other (mainly European) choral works. Rutter has concentrated on composing vocal music, particularly for choirs. Within this field he has become probably the most popular and widely performed composer of his generation, especially in the UK and the USA. His idiom grows out of the British choral tradition as exemplified by Holst, Vaughan Williams, Howells, Britten and Tippett, but also draws on a wider sympathy for European music of the later 19th and early 20th centuries, especially the harmonic and melodic language of Fauré, Duruflé and their contemporaries. Rutter's particular gift is for skilled craftsmanship and memorable phrase, found at its simplest in works such as the anthem ...

Article

Norbert Carnovale

revised by Richard Dyer

(Alexander)

(b New York, Nov 22, 1925; d Boston, June 21, 2015). American composer, conductor, educator, writer, publisher, and record producer. He was born into a musical family that had immigrated to America from Germany; his father played in the violin section of the New York PO for 42 years. In 1937 Schuller enrolled in the St. Thomas Church Choir School in New York where his general musical education was supervised by T. Tertius Noble. By the time he finished high school, he was already a horn player of professional caliber. At the age of 16 he performed in the American premiere broadcast of Shostakovich’s Symphony no.7, the “Leningrad,” conducted by Toscanini; his first book, Horn Technique (London and New York, 1962, 2/1992) has remained a standard reference.

After a season touring in the American Ballet Theatre orchestra under the direction of Antal Dorati, Schuller was appointed to the position of principal horn in the Cincinnati SO (from ...

Article

Mark Berresford

(Coleman )

(b Brunswick, MO, Feb 7, 1882; d New York, NY, March 9, 1961). American clarinetist, bandleader, composer, and music publisher. His first professional engagement (c1897–8) was with a “pickaninny” band led by Nathaniel Clark Smith. In 1902 he was assistant leader of P.G. Lowery’s band with Forepaugh and Sells Circus and later that year joined Mahara’s Minstrels band under the leadership of W.C. Handy. In 1903 he formed his own band in Minneapolis, where he made the first recordings by an African American band. Sweatman moved to Chicago in 1908, where he led trios at the Grand and Monogram theaters. In 1911 he made his first vaudeville appearance, and in late 1916 made the first records recognizable as jazz performances. In 1918 Sweatman’s band was signed to an exclusive recording contract with Columbia, their records rivalling those by the Original Dixieland Jazz Band. He continued to work through the 1920s and early 1930s in vaudeville, and in ...