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Michael Ellzey

(b East McKeesport, PA, Nov 8, 1948). American trumpeter and pedagogue. He attended San Diego State University (BA 1970, music education; MA, trumpet performance) and the University of California, San Diego (PhD 1980, music). He taught music at the State University of New York at Cortland from 1985 to 2012, and has served as instructor of trumpet at Colgate University in Hamilton, New York. He has also been a research consultant for the instrument museum in Schloss Kremsegg in Kremsmünster, Austria.

Considered one of the leading scholars and performers on the keyed bugle, he wrote the definitive volume on the instrument, The Keyed Bugle (Metuchen, NJ, 1993, 2/2004). His debut solo album, Music for Keyed Bugle, is the first full-length recording devoted to the keyed bugle. His Das Flügelhorn (Bergkirchen, Germany, 2004) was published in both English and German editions. His many other scholarly publications include contributions to the ...

Article

Mark E. Perry

(b San Juan, PR, March 26, 1854; d San Juan, PR, April 4, 1934). Puerto Rican composer, flutist, scholar, and conductor. His earliest achievements came as a flutist; he studied flute with Italian-born Rosario Aruti. Chiefly self-taught as a composer, he was influenced musically by his father, a cellist and double bass player, and Felipe Gutiérrez Espinosa, an established Puerto Rican composer of sacred music. In 1877 Dueño Colón received the gold medal from the Ateneo Puertorriqueño for the symphonic work La amistad (1877). In 1880 he formed a municipal band in Bayamón and shortly afterwards served as the flutist for the chapel of San Juan Cathedral. Awards for his compositions continued, including a silver medal at the Pan American Exposition, held in Buffalo in 1901, for Canciones escolares, a collection of original songs as well as arrangements for Puerto Rican school children. In addition to showing substantial interest in European masterworks, he embarked on the scholarly study of the Puerto Rican ...

Article

Eldonna L. May

(b New York, NY, Jan 5, 1956). American conductor, composer, and clarinetist. After growing up in Harlem and the South Bronx, he attended the Eastman School (BA 1978), Queens College (MA 1979), and the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (PhD 1982). He served as assistant professor of music at Carleton College (1982–6), then became the principal guest conductor at the Dance Theatre of Harlem (1986–99) and the resident conductor at the Detroit SO (1987–99). From 1994 to 2001 he worked as assistant to veteran conductor Kurt Masur with the New York Philharmonic. He served as music director of the Detroit SO and the Dearborn SO (1987–94), Symphony Nova Scotia (1996–9), and the Annapolis SO (1998–2003). He was principal conductor of the Joffrey Ballet of Chicago (2003–9), and in 2009 he became the principal conductor of the Louisville Ballet. He has conducted the major American orchestras and has been a prominent international guest conductor, leading ensembles such as the Royal Ballet of London, the Madrid SO, and the Warsaw Sinfonia. He has been a regular visitor to South Africa, where he has performed with that country’s major orchestras, including the KwaZulu-Natal PO. Dunner was the first American winner of the Arturo Toscanini International Conducting Competition in ...

Article

Barbara Jepson

revised by David Atkinson Wells

(b Streator, IL, March 6, 1922). American flutist. She studied privately with georges Barrère and Bradley Kincaid, and at the Eastman School under Joseph Mariano (1939–43). She became second flutist of the National SO (1943–5) and then the Los Angeles PO (1946–52); she also played first flute in radio studios and Hollywood Bowl concerts. In 1952 she became first flutist of the Boston SO; she was one of the first woman appointed to a principal position in a major American orchestra and was the Boston SO’s only female principal until 1980. She was also a charter member of the Boston Symphony Chamber Players, founded in 1963. Dwyer retired from the Boston SO in 1990 to pursue a solo career. Her farewell performance was as soloist in the world premiere of Ellen Taaffe Zwilich’s Concerto for Flute, commissioned by the Boston SO for the occasion. Dwyer has appeared as a soloist in the United States and Europe; she has given the first performances of works for flute by Walter Piston, William Bergsma, and Leonard Bernstein, and has recorded music for flute by Amy Marcy Beach, Bernstein, Claude Debussy, John La Montaine, Daniel Pinkham, Piston, and Zwilich, among others. She has taught at Pomona College and the New England Conservatory, and as of ...

Article

Sarah Adams Hoover

(b Flint, MI, March 28, 1933). American organologist, curator, and tuba player. He studied tuba with Roy Benson and William Graves at Graceland University (1951–53), performed under william donald Revelli at the University of Michigan (BM 1955), and worked with William Bell at Manhattan School of Music (MM 1959). He also studied musicology with Paul Revitt at the University of Missouri, Kansas City (DMA 1969), where his dissertation focused on the D.S. Pillsbury collection of American-made brass instruments in Dearborn, Michigan. From 1961 to 1969 he was principal tuba player with the Kansas City Philharmonic and has since performed regularly on tuba as well as historical instruments including the serpent, the ophicleide, the saxhorn, and musical glasses. He served as curator of musical instruments at the Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village in Dearborn (1971–85), producing pioneering research and curating exhibitions of early 19th-century American woodwind and brass instruments, instrument makers, and performers. From ...

Article

Stephen Montague

revised by Kelly Hiser

(Arthur )

(b Kankakee, IL, March 22, 1942; d San Rafael, CA, Sept 25, 1996). American composer, trombonist, conductor, and double bassist. He attended the University of Illinois, where he studied trombone with Robert Gray and composition with Kenneth Gaburo, herbert Brün , and salvatore Martirano (BM in performance 1965). He studied jazz improvisation with lee Konitz and electronic music with richard b. Hervig at the University of Iowa (1970–71). He was a member of the Harry Partch Ensemble (1961–2) and the Illinois Contemporary Chamber Players (1963–6) and was an associate artist at the University of Iowa Center for New Music and New Performing Arts (1969–74). From 1974 to 1984 English lived in Europe, where he performed widely as a soloist and with jazz and new music ensembles, at festivals, and on radio. He collaborated with his wife Candace Natvig, a singer and violinist; in ...

Article

Henry Sapoznik

(b Brooklyn, NY, Oct 4, 1912; d Plantation, FL, March 18, 2000) American klezmer clarinetist, saxophonist, and violinist. Though born in the United States, he was considered an equal of the great European klezmer clarinetists such as Dave Tarras and Naftule Brandwein.

Beginning his career at age 12 playing violin for silent movies, Epstein mastered the clarinet and later the saxophone, and played regularly on the Yiddish stage, on the radio, and in concert. The Epstein Brothers, including Max, Willie (trumpet), Isidore, or “Chizik” (clarinet) and Julie (drums), dominated the New York Jewish music scene for nearly three decades. They are best known for their playing in the Hasidic community in postwar New York, where they became the pre-eminent orchestra. They issued several recordings, including the classic LP Dukes of Freilachland (1958).

After a disastrous investment in a Yiddish theater, Max and his brothers abandoned New York for Florida, where they continued to play for weddings and parties. The number of people who requested the music they had mastered steadily diminished throughout the 1960s, however. The renewed interest in klezmer music in the 1970s brought them out of retirement. Their career was further enhanced when keyboard player Pete Sokolow (...

Article

David Wozniak

(b Leavenworth, KS, May 25, 1936). American jazz saxophonist and studio woodwind musician. After graduating from the University of Kansas, Foster moved to Los Angeles, where he became a leading freelance performer on clarinet, saxophone, and flute. Since the late 1960s, he has been a member of several hundred film and television orchestras . Foster can be heard on more than five hundred movie soundtracks, including Chicago (2002) and Catch Me If You Can (2002). The National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences awarded Foster the Most Valuable Player Award for woodwind doubling.

As a jazz saxophonist, he was a founding member of the Toshiko Akiyoshi-Lew Tabackin Big Band, performing with them from 1973 to 1982. He has appeared and recorded with jazz artists such as Clare Fischer, Warne Marsh, Lee Konitz, and Bill Dobbins, and with popular musicians including Barbra Streisand, Mel Torme, Natalie Cole, Frank Sinatra, and Rosemary Clooney. His jazz recordings include solo albums, including ...

Article

Nicholas Michael Butler

(b Valenciennes, France, c1756; d Charleston, SC, Feb 17, 1818). French clarinetist and composer. Foucard first appeared in Charleston, South Carolina, in December 1793, among a number of theater musicians who had recently arrived from Saint-Domingue (Haiti). Over the next quarter century he appeared on numerous concert and theater programs as the principal clarinet soloist in Charleston. In addition to teaching and occasionally retailing instruments, Foucard also performed with and led wind bands on many occasions in Charleston, and may have played a significant role in sustaining band music in the city during his lifetime. A Charleston band first performed Foucard’s General Pinckney’s March in February 1799, upon the return of Charles Cotesworth Pinckney from an important diplomatic mission to France. A Republican festival in March 1801 also included Foucard’s Jefferson’s March and Burr’s March. The first two of these three works were performed on numerous occasions in early 19th-century Charleston....

Article

Denise A. Gordon

(b Manchester, CT, Jan 18, 1904; d Corona, CA, July 30, 2006). American accordionist, composer, and arranger. In 1911 he toured the United States and Canada, playing cornet and accordion in Chautauqua concerts and vaudeville shows. He studied harmony with John Van Broekhaven in New York (1918) and theory and conducting with Gaston Usigli at the San Francisco Conservatory (1933). He devoted himself to promoting accordion as a legitimate concert instrument: in 1939 at the Galanti Accordion Conservatory in New York, he became the first to conduct a master class in accordion playing; he was also the first to give accordion recitals in a number of venues including New York’s Town Hall, Chicago’s Civic Opera House, and Los Angeles’s Philharmonic Auditorium. Galla-Rini’s first performance of his Accordion Concerto in G minor took place on 15 November 1941 with the Oklahoma City SO and marked the first time an accordionist had ever appeared with a symphony orchestra. With nine others he was a co-founder of the American Accordionists’ Association (...

Article

Trudi Ann Wright

(b Summit, MS, July 5, 1913; d Petersburg, VA, April 16, 1989). American conductor, clarinetist, and educator. He gained his musical training at Oberlin College, Northwestern University, and Columbia University, where he received his doctorate in music education. After graduation he became a faculty member at Bennett College and then at Lincoln University in Missouri. From 1947 he spent 29 years working at Virginia State College (from 1979, Virginia State University), where he directed instrumental music. He led military, symphonic, and marching bands, which toured and won recognition throughout North America and Europe. He was also active as a band clinician, guest conductor, and workshop consultant. Along with his work as an educator, Gatlin maintained a performance career as a clarinetist, appearing with numerous US bands and orchestras including the St. Louis SO.

In 1960 Gatlin co-founded the Intercollegiate Music Association with Evelyn Johnson and Albert Grauer which in the early 2010s was continuing to “enrich and enhance the development of the students” in its historically black member institutions. After his retirement from Virginia State in ...

Article

George Gelles

(b Boston, MA, June 18, 1921; d Whelan, MA, Dec 9, 2006). American oboist, brother of harold Gomberg . At the age of 14 he entered the Curtis Institute and studied with Tabuteau , as had his brother. Three years later Stokowski appointed him principal oboist in the All-American Youth Orchestra. After four years of military service he became solo oboist with the Baltimore SO and concurrently head of the oboe department at the Peabody Conservatory. After playing in the New York City Center SO at the invitation of Bernstein, in ...

Article

Michael Fleming

(b New York, NY, July 20, 1936). American flutist and recorder player. He studied flute at the Eastman School of Music, from which he graduated in 1956. While a student he taught himself to play the recorder; later he took up the Baroque flute after finding one in an antique shop. He was a member of the New york pro musica from 1961 to 1974, performing on a variety of medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque wind instruments. His virtuoso playing can be heard on many of the group’s recordings. In 1965 he formed the Philidor Trio with the soprano Elizabeth Humes and the harpsichordist Edward Smith; the group toured and recorded until 1980 when it was dissolved. A versatile and spirited player, Gruskin has done much to dispel long-held notions about the intractability of early woodwind instruments. He taught music history and early-music performance practice at the New England Conservatory of Music, the Hartt College of Music, and Queens College in New York. In ...

Article

Stefaan Verdegem

(b Liège, April 7, 1859; d Bruxelles, July 19, 1917). Belgian oboist, teacher, and director of the Brussels Monnaie opera house. He studied oboe at the Liège Conservatoire with Alphonse Romedenne, receiving the premier prix in 1875, and a gold medal in 1877. Guidé started his career as principal oboe of the Association Artistique in Angers, France, where he became acquainted with a number of young French composers including Massenet, Chabrier, Saint-Saëns, and Vincent d’Indy, who dedicated his Fantaisie pour Orchestre et Hautbois principal op.31 to him. In 1884 he became the oboe teacher at the Brussels Conservatoire, and principal oboe of the Monnaie opera house. Much admired by conductors and composers such as Felix Mottl, Hans Richter, and Richard Strauss—who called him ‘the poet of the oboe’—Guidé’s reputation was renowned throughout Europe. Considered the godfather of the Belgian oboe school, the most famous of his students was Henri De Busscher, who influenced Leon Goossens and the English oboe school, and, later, as oboist of the L.A. Philharmonic Orchestra, the American oboe school as well. Also gifted as a conductor and concert organizer, Guidé became co-director, together with Maurice Kufferath, of the Monnaie opera house in ...

Article

Patrick Richards

(Marty )

(b Jan 7, 1952). American horn player. Hackleman began studying horn in Houston with Caesar LaMonaca. Other teachers included Barry Tuckwell and Roland Berger. At nineteen, while at the University of Houston, he was appointed principal horn of the Calgary Philharmonic and accepted the same position two years later with the Vancouver Symphony. He was a member of Canadian Brass, the from 1983 to 1986 and left the group to join the Empire Brass Quintet in 1986. In 1989 he discontinued his association with Empire Brass and returned to his position in Vancouver. In 2000 he moved to the National Symphony Orchestra. In addition to his current position with the National Symphony, he is also a member of Summit Brass and serves as principal horn of the Washington Symphonic Brass. He has taught at the University of Maryland, Boston University, the University of British Columbia, the University of Missouri–Kansas City Conservatory, and the Chamber Music Sessions at the Banff Centre in Alberta, Canada. Hackleman can be heard on many recordings with the Vancouver Symphony, Montreal Symphony, National Symphony, Washington Symphonic Brass, Canadian Brass, Summit Brass, Tidewater Brass, and Empire Brass. He has released one solo recording, ...

Article

Christopher Brodersen

(b Bethlehem, PA, 1947). American oboist and maker of early oboes and bassoons, based in Germany. After initial studies at the Oberlin Conservatory, he enrolled at the Schola Cantorum Basiliensis, studying Baroque oboe under Michel Piguet (1932–2004). Hailperin graduated from the Schola Cantorum in 1970, with the first diploma in Baroque oboe performance from that institution. In 1971 he joined the Vienna Concentus Musicus under Harnoncourt. Hailperin participated in numerous recordings and tours with the Concentus Musicus during the period 1971–9. During this time he began building instruments, following short internships with recorder makers Bob Marvin and Friedrich von Huene. With the encouragement of Jürg Schäftlein, Hailperin made copies of the Paulhahn oboe in the Harnoncourt collection; these copies were soon in demand by leading players. Hailperin’s reconstructions of the Eichentopf oboe da caccia, based on two originals in Scandinavian museums, were the first modern copies to use a brass bell....

Article

Ron Emoff

[Christian ]

(b Wanda, MN, Dec 25, 1922; d New Ulm, MN, Dec 11, 2007). American maker and player of concertinas. Of Bohemian ancestry, he grew up listening to his mother, Anna Schroeder Hengel, sing German folk songs and popular tunes while accompanying herself on the organ. He was greatly influenced and inspired by concertina player “Whoopee” John Wilfahrt, also of Bohemian ancestry, whose recordings he heard as a child. At the age of 14 Hengel acquired his first button accordion, a mail-order Hohner factory-built instrument. He later switched to the Chemnitzer-style concertina (a bisonoric button instrument that sounds different pitches on the pushing in or pulling out of thee bellows). He never learned to read music instead playing entirely by ear. He performed with the Jolly Brewers Band and the Six Fat Dutchmen during the 1950s; he also played with Wilfahrt’s band. In 1953 Hengel acquired the entire contents of the Chicago factory of Otto Schlicht (maker of concertinas under the brand names Patek and Pearl), and in ...

Article

Amanda Pepping

(b Duncan, OK, 1950). American trumpeter. An international trumpet soloist and master teacher, he is the founder of the Summit Brass and Summit Records, a co-founder of the Rafael Méndez Brass Institute, and the proprietor of Hickman Music Editions. From 1974 to 1982 Hickman taught at the University of Illinois, then moved in 1982 to Arizona State University, where he serves as the Regents Professor of Trumpet. His many students hold positions in symphony orchestras, military bands, chamber groups, and universities. Through his instigation and with the support of the Méndez family, he established the Rafael Méndez Library in the School of Music at Arizona State in 1993. In addition to performing and teaching, Hickman has written many pedagogical trumpet texts. He also served as president of the International Trumpet Guild from 1977–9 to 1979 and hosted its conference in 1977. In 2005, he received the guild’s prestigious ITG Award of Merit. Hickman has performed with hundreds of orchestras around the world and can be heard on 17 solo albums, 11 Summit Brass recordings, and 4 St. Louis Brass Quintet albums....

Article

Patrick Richards

[Doug ]

(b Lincoln, NE, Feb 6, 1946). American horn player and pedagogue. Hill began studying horn in his early teens in Lincoln, Nebraska, with Jack Snider and later studied with philip Farkas and Paul Ingraham. He received the bachelor’s degree from Indiana University and the Master of Music cum laude from Yale University. He taught at the Oberlin Conservatory of Music before joining the faculty of the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 1974. He has been a member of the Spoleto Festival Brass Quintet, the Wisconsin Brass Quintet, the Wingra Wind Quintet, the New York Brass Quintet, and the American Brass Quintet. He also has served as principal horn for the Rochester PO and the Madison SO and has toured with the Henry Mancini and Andy Williams orchestras. Hill’s recordings include The Modern Horn (1996) and Music for Horn and Piano (1999), both with Karen Zaczek Hill. He has also composed dozens of works, including those recorded on ...

Article

Michael Ellzey

[Theodor ]

(b Spremberg, Germany, Jan 9, 1842; d Brooklyn, NY, Feb 13, 1906). Cornetist of German birth. He began playing the cornet at an early age. At 10 he moved to Berlin, where he became a member of the famed Kaiser Franz Guard Grenadier Second Regiment Band. In 1867 the band won first prize at the Paris Exposition, and Hoch received the gold medal for his solo playing. He visited the United States in 1872 with the band for the World’s Peace Jubilee, and on a return trip in 1876, he and the band performed at the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia.

He immigrated around 1880 to the United States, where he worked as a cornet soloist, teacher, and composer. His Tutor for the Cornet (1880) is based on his principle of placing most of the pressure of the mouthpiece against the lower lip, thus allowing the upper lip to vibrate freely. This method gave him an extraordinary range. He also composed orchestral works and solos for the cornet, including “Alpine Flowers,” “American Fantasia,” “Echoes of the Valley,” “Fantasie Brilliante,” “Souvenir de Bellini,” “Remembrance of Prague,” and “Greetings from the Old World.” He often performed on an “echo-cornet” built to his design by the Conn Company. He concluded many concerts by unfurling an American flag from the long bell of a Conn herald trumpet while playing “The Star-Spangled Banner.”...