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Gary W. Kennedy

(b Naharia, Israel, April 20, 1970). Israeli double bass player. He played piano from the age of nine and began formal lessons when he was 11. At the age of 14 he moved with his family to St. Louis, where he became interested in jazz, and a year later he took up electric bass guitar after hearing recordings by Jaco Pastorius. In 1986 he and his family returned to Israel, and in Jerusalem he attended a music and arts high school; however, in 1987 he left to pursue a career as a musician. He then played rock in an Israeli army band, and after his military service he took up double bass. In 1992 he moved to New York, where he studied briefly with Andy Gonzalez and worked with Brad Mehldau in a trio alongside Adam Cruz; Jorge Rossy replaced Cruz for a tour of Spain. Cohen was also active as a freelance with, among others, Paquito D’Rivera, Leon Parker, Wynton Marsalis, Joshua Redman, and Roy Hargrove, and he often performed at Small’s in a group consisting of Ravi Coltrane, Steve Wilson, the pianist Jason Lindner, and the drummer Jeff Ballard. In ...

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(b New York, May 28, 1954). Drummer. He attended Bennington College (BA 1984) and studied there for three semesters with Milford Graves, who introduced him to percussion styles of traditional African and Indian music. After receiving a master’s degree in third-stream music and composition from the New England Conservatory he returned to New York, where he worked with Matthew Shipp (1990–95) and David S. Ware’s quartet (1992–6) and became well known for his aggressive, polyrhythmic playing style. From 1992 to 1993 he performed alongside Rob Brown and Joe Morris (ii) in the cooperative trio Youniverse. In 1997 he began to concentrate on his own compositions; he formed a trio with Brown and the double bass player Chris Lightcap which two years later became a quartet with the addition of Morris. Dickey has served on the board of directors of the Vision Festival from ...

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DIW  

Kazunori Sugiyama and Gary W. Kennedy

Record label established in Japan in 1982 by Disk Union. Disk Union had been set up as the Union Trading Company in 1941 and incorporated as the Union Electronics Trading Company in 1953; the company divided into Disk Union and Audio Union in 1979, but these two divisions merged once again under the name Disk Union in 1991. Its main activity is selling audio, visual, and computer media products through its own numerous stores in and around Tokyo; however, it also imports and serves as a wholesale distributor for LPs and CDs, and DIW is an extension of this facet of its business. The name DIW (Discs in the World) was taken from that of a magazine which introduced the latest releases from various European and American labels, and which was distributed at Disk Union stores.

DIW’s first album was recorded in 1983 in New York by Wilber Morris, with David Murray and Dennis Charles as sidemen. Murray later became one of the label’s principal artists. Others with extensive recordings in the catalogue include the Art Ensemble of Chicago, James “Blood” Ulmer (under his own name and as the leader of the Music Revelation Ensemble), Kaoru Abe, and John Zorn’s quartet Masada; David S. Ware, Harold Mabern, James Williams, Jean-Paul Bourelly, John Hicks, Lester Bowie, and Steve Grossman are also well represented. Always keen to record new and aggressive artists, DIW has released early albums by James Carter and Rodney Whitaker. In ...

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Sergey Belichenko

(Konstantinovich )

(b Tashkent, Uzbekistan SSR [now Uzbekistan], Nov 24, 1949). Russian pianist, composer, and leader. He entered the conservatory in Tashkent in 1958 and graduated in 1968. After moving to Novosibirsk (1969) he appeared at the city’s third jazz festival and studied at the conservatory (to 1973). He worked in groups with Sergey Belichenko, among them Jazz Golden Years (1977), alongside the trumpeter Valery Kolesnikov, the trombonist Victor Budarin, Anatoly Vapirov, and the double bass player Ivars Galneiks; Vladimir Tolkachev also played with the group, as did the vibraphonist Igor Uvarov. Dmitriev taught jazz at Novosibirsk Musical College from 1976, and in that same year he organized his own trio, with which he performed at festivals in the USSR. In 1981 he formed a duo with Uvarov, and he also joined the Western Siberian Jazz Quartet. From 1984 he led the jazz quintet at the conservatory in Novosibirsk. In ...

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(b Copenhagen, Feb 7, 1969). Danish bass player and leader, brother of Niels Lan Doky. His mother is Danish and his father Vietnamese. He learned classical piano from the age of five and played percussion in the Tivoli Garden Marching Band when he was 14. Two years later he took up electric bass guitar, and at the age of 18 he was inspired by Ron Carter to teach himself double bass. Doky worked as the house bass player at La Fontaine in Copenhagen (1984–6) and then lived in New York (August 1988–1991), where he played with, among others, Joey Calderazzo, Kevin Hays, Ben Perowsky, Bill Stewart, Larry Goldings, and Randy Brecker. In the late 1980s he toured Europe in groups led by Brecker and Bill Evans (iii), and from the same time through the 1990s he and his brother led the Doky Brothers with Tommy Smith, Ulf Wakenius, and Jukka-Pekka Uotila among their sidemen. In addition Doky was a member of Mike Stern’s trio, with which he performed in the USA, Italy, and France, and worked with Bireli Lagrene (...

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Mark Gilbert

(b Copenhagen, Oct 3, 1963). Danish pianist and leader, brother of Christian Minh Doky. His mother is Danish and his father Vietnamese. He played classical guitar before taking up piano at the age of 11, and when he was 15 he became a protégé of Thad Jones, who was then living in Denmark. On Jones’s recommendation he attended the Berklee College of Music in Boston (1981–4), after which he moved to New York and played with, among others, Joe Henderson, Clark Terry, Charlie Haden, Ray Brown, David Sanborn, and Woody Shaw; he made his first recording as leader in 1985. As a leader or a sideman Doky has worked with Bob Berg, Jack DeJohnette, Bill Evans (iii), Tom Harrell, John Abercrombie, Gary Peacock, Randy Brecker, Al Jarreau, John Scofield, Michael Brecker, and Toots Thielemans. In the late 1980s he and his brother began leading the Doky Brothers, and in the 1990s he was also active as a record producer....

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[Roberto T.]

(b Bacolod City, Philippines, May 20, 1943; d Stayton, OR, Aug 6, 1996). Filipino pianist. He was self-taught. Around 1960 he moved to Manila, where he performed in a group co-led by Tony Scott. He then left the Philippines and performed with Tito Puente in Hong Kong in 1961 before settling in Taiwan, where he worked in a house band on a US military installation. From 1964 to 1967 he lived and worked in Okinawa, Japan. In 1967, in Las Vegas, he arranged the music for and conducted the Filipino revue Moses and the Hi-Brows, then from 1968 to 1970 he was in Hawaii as music director for the singer Don Ho. After a further spell in Las Vegas he moved to San Francisco, where he led a trio at the Mikayo Hotel (1973–5), and back to Hawaii to lead a quartet and perform as an unaccompanied soloist at the Moana Hotel (...

Article

Roger T. Dean

(b Shanghai, China, Aug 16, 1943). Australian pianist and composer. He studied piano before moving to Australia around 1951, and then also learned trumpet; he took Australian citizenship in the mid-1950s. By the age of 17 he was concentrating on piano. From 1963 to 1969 he led a trio at El Rocco in Sydney, except for periods during the years 1964–6, when he was in London. He returned there between 1970 and 1974 and worked at Ronnie Scott’s club and many other venues. In Australia again he formed Free Kata, probably the first Australian free-improvisation group, mainly with Eddie Bronson (saxophone) and Lou Burdett (drums). While continuing to play as an unaccompanied soloist and in small free-improvising groups he recorded in conventional settings with such visitors to Australia as Anita O’Day, Art Pepper, Sonny Stitt, Herb Ellis, Richie Cole, and Ray Brown. Ermoll has been influenced by karate and associated philosophies, as is superficially visible in his often aggressive, even violent approach to the keyboard; this connection also manifests itself in deeper, but intangible ways....

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Howard Rye

[Nugetre ]

(b Constantinople [now Istanbul], July 31, 1923). American record producer, brother of Nesuhi Ertegun. He traveled internationally in his youth – his father was minister to Switzerland, Turkish observer at the League of Nations, and the Turkish ambassador to France (living in Paris from 1929), Great Britain (London from 1931), and the United States (Washington, DC, from 1934) – and was educated at St. John’s College, Annapolis (BA 1944). He first became involved with Herb Abramson in running two small, short-lived record labels, Quality and Jubilee; then in late 1947 the two men founded the company and label Atlantic (jazz), with Ertegun as vice-president. It became one of the largest independent labels concerned with jazz, rhythm-and-blues, and soul recordings, and retained this position throughout the 1950s and 1960s. The company was purchased by Warner Bros. in 1967 but remained under its previous management. In the 1980s and 1990s Ertegun continued to be an executive of great importance in popular music, and in ...

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Barry Kernfeld

[Ahmed Muvaffak ]

(b Izmir, Turkey, Aug 30, 1930). Turkish trumpeter. He grew up in a musical family and first played jazz at clubs and parties while attending the conservatory of music in Ankara (1947–54). Having been discovered by Dizzy Gillespie when he played a welcoming salute when the famous trumpeter arrived at Ankara airport in 1956, Falay lived in Germany (1956–9) and then moved to Sweden, where he performed and recorded with Nils Lindberg; he also played and in 1960 recorded with Harry Arnold, the singer Boris Lindquist, and Arne Domnérus. With Quincy Jones he recorded (1961), performed at the Swedish Jazz Festival (1963), and collaborated on film music. He recorded in Germany with the Clarke–Boland Big Band (1961, 1963) and Kurt Edelhagen (1964), and later made recordings, principally in Stockholm, with Bernt Rosengren (1969, 1971, 1973...

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Gary W. Kennedy

(Nicholas )

(b Boston, May 19, 1961). American pianist and record producer. He attended the Oberlin (Ohio) Conservatory of Music (BM piano and jazz 1983) and also studied classical Indian music (1983–4). Between 1986 and 1990 he led his own quartet, with either Joe Lovano or Dick Oatts on saxophone and Drew Gress and Jamey Haddad filling out the rhythm section, and from ...

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Kazunori Sugiyama and Barry Kernfeld

(b Takamatsu, Japan, Aug 31, 1953). Japanese double bass player and leader. He grew up in a musical family, took up double bass at the age of 15, and attended the Tokyo University of Fine Arts and Music, the Berklee College of Music (1974–5), and the Juilliard School (1980–84), where he completed undergraduate and graduate degrees. While still a student he performed with Horace Silver (1975), Joe Lee Wilson and Clifford Jordan (both 1975–9), and Jaki Byard (1977–81), as well as with Jackie McLean, Woody Shaw, Sunny Murray, Roy Haynes, Eddie Jefferson, Eddie Gomez, Rashied Ali, and Sam Rivers. Following his graduation he played with Gunter Hampel (1984–6, recording at Sweet Basil, New York, in 1985) and then worked with Archie Shepp (1986) and recorded with Fred Ho’s Afro-Asian Music Ensemble. Later he performed and recorded with Thomas Chapin (from ...

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(b Tokyo, Feb 21, 1949). Japanese trombonist and leader. After working with Sadao Watanabe (1972–4) he attended the New England Conservatory and performed and recorded with its Jazz Repertory Orchestra (1974). He then returned to Japan, where he played and recorded as the leader of a quintet that included two trombones (...

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Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, Feb 13, 1936). Japanese alto saxophonist and singer. He had violin lessons when he was ten, then changed to clarinet, and had taken up alto saxophone by the age of 17, at which time he began playing professionally at clubs on US military bases; when he was 20 he began to sing. From 1959 he led a succession of bands: Takashi Furuya and the Freshmen, the Concord, the Neo Sax Band, the Neighborhood Big Band, and Reunion. He also performed with the Blue Echoes, the Arrow Jazz Orchestra, Gil Evans’s Japanese orchestra, Fumio Karashima, and Makoto Ozone, recorded with the sextet led by the double bass player Naosuke Miyamoto (1973), and joined tours of Japan made by Phil Woods’s quartet, Mal Waldron, and Dizzy Gillespie. Furuya teaches at the NHK (Japan Broadcasting Corporation) Cultural Center and his own vocal school. In concert in Osaka in ...

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Walter Ojakäär

(Aramovich )

(b Moscow, Aug 15, 1934). Russian alto saxophonist, composer, and bandleader of Armenian descent. Formerly known as Garanyan, he began to spell his surname Garanian at some point in the 1990s. He taught himself to play saxophone and led an amateur octet (1954–7) which later evolved into the youth orchestra of the Art Workers’ Central House in Moscow. For the next eight years he was a principal soloist in and arranger for Oleg Lundstrem’s orchestra (1958–66); he also led a quartet with the guitarist Nikolay Gromin, performing at festivals in Tallinn, Prague, and Moscow. He was a member of the Kontsertny Estradny Orkestr Tsentral’novo TV i Vsesoyuznovo Radio (Concert variety orchestra of the central TV and all-union radio) from 1966 to 1970, and after studying at the Moscow P. I. Tchaikovsky State Conservatory (until 1969) he led the orchestra from 1970 until it disbanded in ...

Article

Gregor  

Michel Laplace

[Kélékian, Krikor ]

(b Turkey, Feb 28, 1898; d Malente, Germany, 1971). Armenian bandleader. From 1928 he led a band in France called the Gregorians, among the members of which were Philippe Brun, Edmond Cohanier, and the pianist Lucien Moraweck; in May 1929 it made a number of recordings that are important in the history of French jazz. Gregor founded the first jazz journal in France, the Revue du jazz, in 1929 and was its editor until it ceased publication in 1930. He toured South America that year with an orchestra that included such illustrious players as Léo Vauchant, Cohanier, and Stephane Grappelli, and returned the following year, when he recorded in Buenos Aires. He continued to lead orchestras of high quality, including such soloists as Alix Combelle, André Ekyan, and Michel Warlop, until 1934. Gregor initiated the French tradition of the show band, a versatile dance orchestra, the instrumentation of which was modeled on that of the big band; his work is well represented by ...

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(b Bandoeng, Dutch East Indies [now Bandung, Java, Indonesia], Feb 21, 1930). Dutch double bass player. As a child he played harmonica and, from the age of eight, ukulele; he studied guitar from 1941, played Hawaiian music in Java during the Japanese occupation, and heard jazz on the AFRS network. In 1947 he moved to the Netherlands and in 1949, while in Berlin, took up double bass, which he played professionally with Pia Beck from October 1950. He toured Germany, Switzerland, and Denmark with Wallace Bishop (1951 – early 1952) and France and North Africa with Bill Coleman (1952), recorded with Coleman in Paris (1953), and while working as a freelance in the city accompanied Dizzy Gillespie, Don Byas, Martial Solal, and Henri Renaud, among others, and performed and recorded with Chet Baker (1955–6). In February 1957, under Baker’s sponsorship, he emigrated to the USA and worked with Terry Gibbs, Blossom Dearie, Miles Davis, and Bernard Peiffer. Later he played with Kai Winding (with whom he recorded in ...

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Kazunori Sugiyama

[Daisuke ]

(b Fukuoka, Japan, May 22, 1959). Japanese drummer. He began as a rock drummer at the age of 18, and took up jazz while at Chiba University. After graduating he spent several years as a studio musician. In 1987 he enrolled at the Berklee College of Music, and while in Boston he played regularly with Roy Hargrove, Joshua Redman, Antonio Hart, Geoff Keezer, Junko Onishi, and others at local jazz clubs. He returned to Japan in 1991 and joined the quartets of Joh Yamada and Seiji Tada, as well as the ensemble Smokin’, led by the guitarist Yoshiaki Miyanoue. In 1992 he joined Onishi’s trio, with which he recorded and toured widely; the group appeared at the festivals in Montreux and Montreal as well as at Sweet Basil in New York. Hara also recorded with Eiji Kitamura and performed at a jazz festival in Los Angeles in 1996...

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Yozo Iwanami

(b Toyama, Japan, Nov 19, 1926). Japanese tenor saxophonist and leader. He played in a navy band from 1943 and at an officers’ club in Tokyo after World War II. In 1952 he became the leader of the Sharps and Flats, which in 1969 became the first Japanese big band to appear at the Newport Jazz Festival and which remained in existence into the 1980s. Hara made about 100 recordings. His band’s style recalls that of Woody Herman’s First Herd; Hara’s saxophone playing is in a traditional swing style....