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Miriam Miller

(d 1679). English music printer. He succeeded Thomas Harper in 1656 and took over the printing of all of John Playford the elder’s musical publications until his death in 1679. Godbid was a reliable and conscientious printer, if not an inspired one. In spite of the fact that the printing materials he inherited from Thomas Harper dated back over a generation, and were out of date by the middle of the 17th century, for 23 years Godbid’s press produced the music volumes on which the elder Playford’s remarkable business was built. He also printed Tomkins’s ...

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Paul-André Gaillard

revised by Laurent Guillo

(b Senlis, Oct 20, 1543; d Geneva, Feb 3, 1628). French music publisher. He studied law in Paris but then devoted himself to the Reformation movement. He left Paris for Geneva in 1566 and was ordained there on 20 October. He carried out his ministry first at Chancy and Cartigny, and then, after serving in several French parishes, was appointed in 1571 to St Gervais, Geneva. He succeeded Bèze as head of the Church in Geneva on the latter’s death in 1605. Between about 1576 and 1597 he published works by Lassus, Arcadelt, Crecquillon, Gérard de Turnhout, Jean de Castro, Noé Faignient, Goudimel, Séverin Cornet, Guillaume Boni, Antoine de Bertrand and others, with modified, and in some cases new, texts. The only composer whose works he published in their original form was Jean Servin. All the known Genevan music printers of this time printed his works (Jean Le Royer, Pierre de Saint-André, Jean II de Tournes) and some of them were commissioned by foreign booksellers (Charles Pesnot in Lyons or Jérôme Commelin in Heidelberg). The prefaces he wrote to his publications (in ...

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Stanley Boorman

(fl Rome, 1624–50). Italian printer and publisher. He was active in Rome from 1624 to 1650. He seems to have had some contact with Vincenzo Bianchi, bookseller and later (from 1628) publisher of music, and who himself printed a few books in the years around 1640. Grignani published a few treatises (mostly by Romano Micheli) before 1638 when he began to print music. In a dozen years he printed nearly 50 books of music or treatises, among them a number of Micheli’s canons. He seems to have published only two books of secular music and two reprints of instrumental works. The rest was characteristically Roman: a collection of sacred works by local composers (Cifra, Francesco Foggia, Massenzio and both Mazzocchis), and a collection edited by Florido de Silvestris. He also reprinted works by Palestrina and Anerio in 1646 and 1649, and published several volumes of music by Diruta and treatises by Kircher and Sabbatini....

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Stanley Boorman

(d after 1610). German printer, son of Georg Hantzsch. He took over his father’s press in 1583 and printed in Mühlhausen until 1599, when he was invited to become city printer at Hildesheim. He started there in 1600 with an ambitious list, but production fell away and he was back in Mühlhausen in 1609. His last recorded edition is dated 1611; all the music that survives from his press appeared before 1600, with the exception of a treatise by Martin Scheffer, printed in 1603. The rest comprises, almost exclusively, volumes dedicated to works by Burck, several of which are editions of music first printed by his father.

J.H. Gebauer: ‘Das Buchgewerbe in der Stadt Hildesheim’, Niedersächsisches Jb, 18 (1941), 223–58 W. Hartmann: ‘Hildesheimer Drucke der Zeit vor 1650’, Alt-Hildesheim, 31 (1960), 1–36 [catalogue with illustrations] J. Benzing: Die Buchdrucker des 16. und 17. Jahrhunderts im deutschen Sprachgebiet (Wiesbaden, 1963, 2/1982)...

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Miriam Miller

(d ?London, March 1656). English music printer. He worked in London from 1614 and acquired part of the business of Thomas Snodham. From 1650 until his death he printed all the elder John Playford’s music publications, including the first edition of The English Dancing Master (dated 1651 but issued in ...

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David Johnson

revised by Kenneth Elliott

(d Edinburgh, Dec 1621). Scottish bookseller and printer. By 1589 he was an importer of foreign books; in 1601 his name appeared in a psalm book printed in Dordrecht, the Netherlands, to be sold in Scotland. In 1610 he became a publisher in Edinburgh, issuing a famous folio Bible in that year and many psalters (with the melodies), as well as books of Scottish court poetry, mathematics and theology. One of the most interesting of the psalters is that of 1615 in which, for the first time, the 12 Common Tunes were printed as a group and given distinctive titles.

After Hart’s death, his widow (d Edinburgh, 3 May 1642) published more psalm books with the imprint ‘the Heires of Andro Hart’. Among these is the most important 17th-century Scottish church music publication, the 1635 psalter, which contains 143 psalm settings, nearly all by Scottish composers: 104 of Proper Tunes, 31 of Common Tunes and 8 imitative settings ‘in reports’....

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Stanley Boorman

(d Coburg, 1618). German printer. He was in charge of the ducal printing house in Coburg from 1596 until his death, and from 1599 he was also a city official. He printed almost nothing but the works of Benedikt Faber, Melchior Franck and Heinrich Hartmann. Particularly interesting among his extant publications is a series of volumes, including anthologies (RISM ...

Article

Marie Louise Göllner

(b Oberursell, c1575; d Munich, 1654). German printer. The son of a printer, he served his apprenticeship under Adam Berg in Munich. In 1597 he married his employer's daughter, Susanna, apparently against the wishes of both families, and became a citizen of Munich. He became a Catholic and was granted permission to found his own printing house by Duke Maximilian I on 3 November 1597. Thanks to the patronage of the powerful Jesuit congregation, Henricus was soon appointed court printer and had by the turn of the century usurped the lead in publishing from Adam Berg. After his death his daughter, Jakobe, continued the business for a short time, selling it to Jakob Jäcklin in 1656.

All publishing in Bavaria was subjected to strict censorship and the dukes reserved to themselves the privilege normally exercised by city governments of granting permission to prospective publishers. Thus Henricus was the only printer, besides Berg and his descendants, who was allowed to practise his trade in Munich, until well into the 17th century. His publications were devoted almost exclusively to collections of sacred Latin music by Orlande de Lassus and by composers such as Jacob Reiner, Aichinger, Klingenstein and Holzner, who worked in Munich or Augsburg in the early 17th century. He also printed most of the works by Sebastian Ertl, including those vocal works with an added organ part or continuo. His chief contribution was the publication of the important posthumous collections of Lassus's works edited by his sons Rudolph and Ferdinand. These include otherwise unpublished masses and ...

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Margaret Dean-Smith

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Miriam Miller

(fl London, 1612–18). English engraver. He engraved the plates for Parthenia, or The Maydenhead of the First Musicke that ever was Printed for the Virginalls (c1612), and Angelo Notari’s Prime musiche (c1613), the earliest engraved music to be published in England. A Robert Hole has been thought to have been the engraver of ...

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Miriam Miller

(fl 1679–99). English music publisher and bookseller. He was one of the London music publishers to employ the printer John Heptinstall, who printed the five books of his Thesaurus musicus, a series of song anthologies (1693–6), and A Collection of New Ayres: Composed for Two Flutes … in 1695. He is generally taken to be the author of a work printed for him by Nathaniel Thompson in 1679, A Vade Mecum for the Lovers of Musick Shewing the Excellency of the Rechorder, and he also published John Banister’s The Most Pleasant Companion or Choice New Lessons for the Recorder or Flute (1681) and some of the songs from Henry Purcell’s The Indian Queen (1695; neither Hudgebut nor his publishing partner, John May, appears to have asked the composer’s permission in this venture). Hudgebut had several addresses during his career: he was first at the Golden Harp and Hoboy in Chancery Lane, then at St Paul’s Churchyard and lastly in the Strand, near Charing Cross. (...

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Teresa Chylińska

(b Halberstadt, 1581; d Danzig [now Gdańsk], 1666). German publisher and bookseller. He began printing in Danzig in 1609, and soon became the principal Reformation printer in Poland, with the support of King Władysław IV. He was a specialist in historical and linguistic books, although he also published a good deal of music. Much of this comprised monophonic songbooks, printed in a single impression using a Gothic notation typeface. In ...

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Wolfgang Spindler

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Margaret Dean-Smith

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Margaret Dean-Smith

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Miriam Miller

(fl 1687–1706). English music printer. Between 1688 and 1697 he did much of the printing for Henry Playford. His press produced six editions of The Banquet of Music, the first two books of Harmonia sacra, and one or two of the Playford family's bestsellers, like The Dancing Master...

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Stanley Boorman and Susan Jackson

(bap. Nuremberg, Feb 29, 1568/9; bur. Nuremberg, 1632). German printer. One of ten children of Johannes Kauffmann and his wife Veronica (née vom Berg), he was the grandson of Katherina Gerlach and the heir, through his mother, to his grandmother’s firm, previously known as that of Berg and Neuber.

He had worked in his grandmother’s printing house from the late 1580s (although not in the early 1580s, as some writers have indicated). After Katherina Gerlach’s death in 1592, her will, dividing the firm between her two daughters, Katherina Dietrich and Veronica Kauffmann, was contested. In 1594 the legal dispute was resolved; Veronica Kauffmann’s part of the firm, which included the printing house, formally became Paul Kauffmann’s in 1595. There is no mention of the firm in Nuremberg documents between 1617 and 1632. After Kauffmann’s death in 1632, the firm apparently passed to David Kauffmann, one of his younger brothers, who is however listed in the city’s documents only as a bookseller, not as a printer....

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Labaun  

Zdeněk Culka

[Laboun]

Czech family of printers. Jiří Labaun had a printing works in Prague, from about 1686 to 1708 (or perhaps 1713); besides prayers, sermons, calendars, legal and other documents he also printed music by such composers as Holan Rovenský and Wentzely. After his death his son Jiří Ondřej took over the business and continued to publish music, including a new edition of Holan Rovenský's Capella regia musicalis and works by Brentner and Gunther Jakob. After Jiří Ondřej's death his widow continued the business; she printed Černohorský's Laudetur Jesus Christus and Vaňura’s Litaniae lauretanae. The printing works, which remained in the Labaun family until about 1769, also produced a series of occasional songs.

ČSHS J. Volf: Dějiny českého knihtisku do roku 1848 [History of Czech book printing to 1848] (Prague, 1926) K. Chyba: Slovník knihtiskařů v Československu od nejstarších dob do roku 1860 [Dictionary of printers in Czechoslovakia from early times to 1860] (Prague, 1966–)...

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Henri Vanhulst

(b Savoy, c1650; d Amsterdam, bur. Dec 5, 1720). French publisher and music printer. He set himself up in Amsterdam as ‘muziekmeester’ and on 1 December 1689 obtained a 15-year licence for music publication. On 24 July 1690 he made an agreement with D. Robethon, by which the latter promised to finance the production of 1000 copies of his first publication, Les trios des opéra de Monsieur de Lully (2 vols., 1690, 1691). This was printed in Amsterdam by Blaeu, who worked for Le Chevalier until Le Chevalier himself became established as a printer in 1692. His publications are known from the catalogue at the end of J. de Gouy’s Airs à quatre parties sur la Paraphrase des pseaumes de Godeau (1691) and from two advertisements in the Amsterdamsche courant (27 December 1691 and 1 July 1692). The second of these states that Le Chevalier sold not only his own publications but also music printed by A. Pointel. Le Chevalier’s catalogue regularly included anthologies (...