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Article

Veslemöy Heintz

(b 1815; d 1900). Swedish publisher, music dealer and printer. He began his career as an apprentice in Östergrens bok-och musikhandel in Stockholm in 1829. The history of the Östergren shop went back as far as 1802 when Pär Aron Borg started selling music from his home in Stockholm, thus founding the firm that was to become one of Sweden’s largest and most long-lived music publishing houses. By 1804 Borg, in partnership with Ulrik Emanuel Mannerhjerta, had opened a music shop. This was taken over by Gustaf Adolf Östergren (1791–1825) who not only sold music and instruments but was also a publisher. After Östergren died, the business passed through various hands until 1831, when Abraham Hirsch, at the age of 17, took over the daily management. In 1837 he bought the business and a year later he acquired a lithographic printing press and continued to expand. In ...

Article

Cynthia Adams Hoover

(b Framingham, MA, 1820; d Watertown, MA, July 6, 1895). American music publisher and music and instrument dealer. According to several accounts he was a farmhand and fiddler. He compiled a large collection of fiddle tunes popular at local dances and persuaded the Boston publishers Wright & Kidder to publish it as The Musician’s Companion. As a result of his success in selling this collection from door to door, he opened a music shop in Providence, Rhode Island, in 1842, and set up a similar business in Boston in 1843. His books of arrangements and instrument instruction were popular: the Complete Preceptor for the Accordeon (1843) sold over 100,000 copies, and his violin self-mastery volumes sold over 500,000 copies. In 1850 he sold his catalogue to the Boston publisher Oliver Ditson and agreed not to publish music for ten years. During that period he lived on his newly acquired estate in South Framingham, managed the South Reading Ice Company and compiled editions of dance music and dance instruction books....

Article

Miriam Miller

(fl 1679–99). English music publisher and bookseller. He was one of the London music publishers to employ the printer John Heptinstall, who printed the five books of his Thesaurus musicus, a series of song anthologies (1693–6), and A Collection of New Ayres: Composed for Two Flutes … in 1695. He is generally taken to be the author of a work printed for him by Nathaniel Thompson in 1679, A Vade Mecum for the Lovers of Musick Shewing the Excellency of the Rechorder, and he also published John Banister’s The Most Pleasant Companion or Choice New Lessons for the Recorder or Flute (1681) and some of the songs from Henry Purcell’s The Indian Queen (1695; neither Hudgebut nor his publishing partner, John May, appears to have asked the composer’s permission in this venture). Hudgebut had several addresses during his career: he was first at the Golden Harp and Hoboy in Chancery Lane, then at St Paul’s Churchyard and lastly in the Strand, near Charing Cross. (...

Article

Teresa Chylińska

(b Halberstadt, 1581; d Danzig [now Gdańsk], 1666). German publisher and bookseller. He began printing in Danzig in 1609, and soon became the principal Reformation printer in Poland, with the support of King Władysław IV. He was a specialist in historical and linguistic books, although he also published a good deal of music. Much of this comprised monophonic songbooks, printed in a single impression using a Gothic notation typeface. In ...

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith and Peter Ward Jones

(fl 1740–62). English music publisher, printer, music seller and possibly violin maker. He began his business in London by 1740, and probably acquired part of those of Daniel Wright and Benjamin Cooke, some of whose publications he reissued from the original plates. Around the mid-18th century the predominance of the Walsh engraving and publishing business began to wane, and Johnson was responsible for publishing some of the best music of the day, including works by Arne, Felton, Geminiani, Nares, Domenico Scarlatti and Stanley, as well as annual volumes and large collections of country dances. Unusually, many of Johnson's editions bore dates; their technical quality was high, some being engraved by John Phillips. A number of fair-quality violins bear the Johnson label, most probably made for rather than actually by him.

Johnson appears to have died about 1762, and from that time to 1777 most of the imprints bear the name of ‘Mrs. Johnson’ or ‘R. Johnson’, presumably his widow. The old imprint ‘John Johnson’ occasionally appears in these years, and may refer to her late husband or to another relative. Johnson's sign from ...

Article

Kornel Michałowski

(b Zduny, Poznań, 1770; d Warsaw, Feb 6, 1830). Polish bookseller and publisher. From about 1816 he managed a music bookshop in Warsaw which sold Polish and foreign music and also engravings of composers and virtuosos. Later he established a publishing house, at first adopting the old engraving techniques but turning gradually towards lithographic processes. His firm was, beside Antoni Brzezina's, the most important music publisher in Warsaw up to 1830. He published works by many Polish composers, including Elsner, Kurpiński, Józef Stefani and Damse, and piano miniatures, arias and opera excerpts from abroad; he also produced several educational books. After his death the firm was taken over by his nephew Ignacy Klukowski (1803–65), who directed it until 1857.

PSB (M. Prokopowicz)T. Frączyk: Warszawa młodości Chopina [Warsaw in Chopin's youth] (Kraków, 1961), 235–74M. Prokopowicz: ‘Wydawnictwo muzyczne Klukowskich 1816–1858’ [The music publishing house of Klukowski, 1816–58], ...

Article

Kornel Michałowski

(b Laszki Wielkie, nr Lemberg [now L′viv], Feb 15, 1836; d Kraków, Oct 11, 1922). Polish bookseller and music publisher. From 1855 he worked in various bookshops in Lemberg, Chernovtsy, Leipzig and Kraków, where in 1870 he founded his own bookshop and swiftly developed it into one of the leading Polish music firms. He specialized in publishing the music of contemporary Polish composers, including J.K. Gall, Noskowski, Szopski, Żeleński, Ignacy Friedman, Niewiadomski, Świerzyński and Wroński. His bookshop also imported the latest editions from abroad, and provided a music lending library, amounting to 16,000 items in 1885. From 1879 Krzyżanowski also managed a concert bureau, organizing performances in Kraków by many prominent virtuosos, notably Anton Rubinstein (1879), Joachim and Brahms (1880), Paderewski (1883 and later), Sarasate, Hofmann, Friedman, Eugène Ysaÿe and others. The versatility of Krzyżanowski’s firm was of great importance to musical life in Kraków, and his bookshop soon became an artistic centre. In ...

Article

Brian Boydell

(b ?Dublin; d Dublin, Feb 21, 1776). Irish publisher, music seller and violinist. He was one of the most prominent and active musicians in Dublin during the 1750s and 60s. In 1745 he was admitted to the City Music, of which he was appointed bandmaster in 1752 at a salary of £40, increased to £60 in 1753. During this period he was appearing regularly as principal violinist at the summer open-air concerts at Marlborough Green between 1750 and 1756 and as conductor of the annual performance of Handel’s Messiah at the Great Musick Hall in Fishamble Street. In July 1751 he became violinist and musical director in the syndicate which leased Crow Street Musick Hall for the six years before it was taken over, rebuilt and opened as a theatre.

Samuel Lee was founder of the music shop and publishing firm which carried out business at Little Green, off Bolton Street (...

Article

Stanley Boorman

(fl 1600–30). Italian printer, bookseller and publisher. He came from a family of scholars, artists and publishers in Milan. (Giovanni Paolo Lomazzo had sponsored the publication of treatises by Gaffurius and Bonaventura da Brescia in the years 1492–1500.) He entered into partnership with the Tini family in 1603 and until 1612 they produced much music, primarily the work of local composers. From 1613 to 1630 Lomazzo worked on his own; a number of his publications appeared from the presses of other printers. He appears to have been musically literate, for he selected the contents of some of his numerous anthologies himself: they include sacred and secular music by many composers, including Ghizzolo, G.S.P. de' Negri, Orfeo Vecchi, Gastoldi and Riccardo Rognoni. He also published treatises by Scaletta and Rognoni.

His son Francesco Lomazzo was also a printer. He published about a dozen books between 1603 and 1619...

Article

Miriam Miller and Andrew R. Walkling

(d ?London, 1625). English bookseller. Presumed to be a younger brother of Humfrey Lownes, with whom he was associated in several offices and commercial ventures throughout his life. He was apprenticed to Nicholas Ling from 1582 to 1591, and began publishing books in 1596 in St Dunstan’s Churchyard, Fleet Street. He moved to ‘The Bishop’s Head’ in St Paul’s Churchyard about 1605. In 1611, along with the bookseller John Browne and the printer Thomas Snodham, he acquired the rights to the music publications of Thomas East, which the three men began issuing as assignees under the music-publishing patent held by William Barley. When Barley died in 1613 or 1614, they assumed Barley’s patent, although there is no record of any formal transfer, or indeed of any effort to renew the patent when it expired in 1619. There is no evidence that Lownes was himself a music printer. He was succeeded on his death by his son-in-law George Latham, who continued publishing music....

Article

Brian Boydell

( b ?Dublin; d Dublin, 1763). Irish music publisher, music seller, instrument dealer and violinist . He worked from about 1738 in the business established by his brother Bartholemew (d July 1758) about a year previously at Corelli’s Head, opposite Anglesea Street in College Green, Dublin. In April 1740 he advertised a proposal for printing Geminiani’s Guida armonica by subscription; it was finally issued in about 1752. Notable publications by him include collections of songs from Arne’s Comus, Dubourg’s variations on the Irish melody ‘Ellen a Roon’ and in December 1752 ‘six Trios for 2 Fiddles and thorough Bass composed by Sieur Van Maldere’. From 1741 a number of publications were issued in conjunction with William Neale, including the Monthly Musical Masque consisting of a collection of contemporary popular songs; the first issue was advertised in January 1744. Manwaring also imported Peter Wamsley’s best violins, Roman fiddle strings and ‘all the newest music published in London’. In addition to his business he took a prominent part in Dublin musical life during the 1740s as a violinist, often appearing with his brother who was also a violinist. He acted as treasurer of various charitable musical societies. After his death his wife carried on the business until ...

Article

Thomas W. Bridges

revised by Tim Carter

[Georges Marescot, Mareschot ]

(d Florence, April 1602). French bookseller and printer, active in Italy. Resident in Florence from the mid-1550s, on 7 April 1558 he matriculated in the Arte dei medici e speziali and became associated with Lorenzo Torrentino, the ‘stampatore ducale’. By 1563 he was commissioning the Torrentino firm to print books on his behalf, and some time later he acquired the firm’s equipment and stock. His production contains nothing of musical interest until Francesco Bocchi’s Discorso sopra la musica (1580–81). Soon after, he completed Vincenzo Galilei’s epochal Dialogo della musica antica et della moderna (1581/R), and in 1582 he published an anthology of three-part madrigals (RISM 15828), in 1584 a volume of two-part pieces by Vincenzo Galilei, in 1585 a reprint of Arcadelt’s Il primo libro di madrigali a quattro voci, and in 1596/7 Stefano Venturi del Nibbio’s Il terzo libro de madrigali a cinque...

Article

Henri Vanhulst

(b Harderwijk, 1613/14; d Amsterdam, bur. Dec 5, 1684). Dutch bookseller, printer and publisher . His shop ‘in’t Musyckboeck’ was in the Stoof-Steegh, Amsterdam, and his business (not exclusively musical) began in 1640; his heirs, Alida and Maria Matthysz, continued it from 1681 to about 1720. He printed several editions for booksellers in Amsterdam (E. Cloppenburch, J. Jansz, Ludwig Elzevier etc.) and brought out others on his own account, including reissues. He sometimes accompanied the text with a Dutch translation or replaced it with an original Dutch text, as in Gastoldi’s Balletten … met drie stemmen: ende nu verrijckt met de vierde partije … ende op gheestelijcke gesangen gheset (1641). Matthysz also published compositions and treatises by local composers, including Ban, Jacobus Haffner, Joseph Butler, Van Eyck, G.Q. van Blankenburg and Carolus Hacquardt. Among his most important publications are collections of instrumental pieces, 20 Koninklijcke fantasien...

Article

Paul van Reijen

(b Elburg, 1695/6; d Amsterdam, bur. May 14, 1768). Dutch music publisher and bookseller . On 8 May 1732 Olofsen gave notice of his intended marriage to Dirkje Jacobs in Amsterdam. He was received into the Amsterdam guild of booksellers on 9 August 1734, four days after he had settled up his burghership. In 1742 his annual income was fixed at 800 guilders, while he had his bookshop in Gravenstraat. In 1743 Olofsen was charged with the printing and selling of a ‘defamatory’ text. Later on he was imprisoned for the dissemination of libellous publications; he was released on 19 November 1749. In the late 1750s the imprint on Olofsen's editions changed to ‘Aan [At] de Nieuwe Kerk, over de Voorburgwal’. His widow was buried in Amsterdam on 28 January 1780.

A catalogue of 1755 contains about 80 titles; among them are Olofsen's own printings of chamber music, concertos and vocal pieces of Dutch composers such as J.P.A. Fischer, Leonard Frischmuth, Hurlebusch, Mahaut, F.G. Michelet and Radeker. Besides original Dutch treatises of Leonard Frischmuth, S.T. van Loonsma and Lustig, Olofsen published theoretical works, translated into Dutch by Lustig, of Quantz (...

Article

(fl 1607–41). Italian bookseller and printer, active in Florence . He matriculated in the Arte dei medici e speziali on 15 November 1607 and by 1614 had become head of the printing firm founded by Giorgio Marescotti and continued by his son Cristofano. He was also a singer trained in the choir of Florence Cathedral. Pignoni made an auspicious entry into music printing in 1614–15 with no fewer than six editions, including masses and motets by Marco da Gagliano, madrigals by Giovanni del Turco, and Giulio Caccini’s Nuove musiche e nuova maniera di scriverle. This initiative was prompted by a generous, if shortlived, financial investment in the firm (in June 1614) by three prominent Florentine patrons, Giovanni del Turco, Lodovico Arrighetti and (for Cosimo del Sera) Giovanni Battista da Gagliano: hence the imprint ‘Zanobi Pignoni, e Compagni’.

Thereafter Pignoni diversified his interests, printing poetry, occasional items and descrizioni...

Article

Colin Timms

( b Samarugio, Rome, c 1580; d Rome, March 10, 1673). Italian music publisher and book dealer . Described in documents of the period as a ‘cartulario’ and ‘librarius’, he built up his publishing concern from a bookdealer’s business that he had probably founded himself. It was situated in central Rome (Parione), and his sign, which appears in his publications, was a hammer. Following his marriage in 1607 he had at least four children of whom one, Giovanni (b 17 July 1612; d 30 Sept 1675), followed his father’s occupation. Both father and son were buried at S Maria in Vallicella (the Chiesa Nuova) in Rome.

Antonio Poggioli published most types of instrumental and sacred and secular vocal music, including reprints of Arcadelt, Lupacchino and Tasso, a complete edition of Cifra’s motets and important anthologies of motets. His publications date from 1620 to 1668 and represent the work of seven Roman printers, among them Robletti, Masotti, Grignani and Mascardi. Giovanni Poggioli is known only as the editor of the later of the two, slightly different, editions of the ...

Article

Clare Iannota Nielsen

(b Lona, c1510; d Venice, ?1576). Italian printer and bookseller. He was active in Venice and worked in the parish of S Giovanni Novo, with a shop on the calle delle Rasse. In 1572 he was elected Prior of the Guild of Booksellers and Printers, succeeding Girolamo Scotto. Working mainly on commission for others, Rampazetto produced at least 190 books in Italian, Latin, Greek or Spanish; literary works, notably reprints, figure prominently in his output.

From 1561 until 1568 he printed music – 31 sets of partbooks, one theory book and a book of laudi spirituali. The last, Serafino Razzi’s voluminous collection (RISM 15636), was sent to Rampazetto by the Florentine publisher Filippo Giunta because Florence had no musical press at the time. Among his other commissions were an anthology of motets (1563³) compiled and edited by the printer Antonio Barrè, and the second book of Vinci’s five-part madrigals (...

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith and Peter Ward Jones

(b London, c1728; d London, ?Jan 1776). English music seller and publisher, brother of John Randall. He was a son or more probably a grandson of Peter Randall, a London music publisher associated with John Walsh, and was presumably the Randall found among the Children of the Chapel Royal from 1736 to 1745. At the death of his cousin John Walsh in 1766, he and John Abell inherited the extensive Walsh business, where they had doubtless been employed. They published for the first time the complete full scores of a number of Handel oratorios, starting with Messiah (1767). After Abell's death on 29 July 1768, Randall remained in business alone. Besides reprinting Walsh publications, sometimes with the original imprint in addition to his own, he published many interesting works, including a reissue in 1771 of Morley's A Plaine and Easie Introduction to Practicall Musicke. Collections of country dances and pleasure-garden songs also came from his press. At his death, his widow Elizabeth carried on the business until ...

Article

Frank Kidson, William C. Smith, Peter Ward Jones and David Hunter

(fl 1737–c1782). English engraver, print-seller and publisher in London. From 1737 until about 1762 he kept a music and print shop in Holborn from which he issued several notable books of songs with pictorial embellishments heading each piece. The earliest, the two-volume Calliope, or English Harmony, was issued from 1737 by and for the engraver in periodical numbers of eight octavo pages each at sixpence per number. The first volume of 25 numbers was completed in 1739; the parts of the second volume began to appear in the same year, though it was probably not finished until about 1746. John Simpson brought out second issues of volume one in 1740 and of volume two in 1747. Late in 1741 Roberts and John Johnson (successor to the Wrights), were accused by Thomas Arne of violating his copyright by printing some of his songs in the second volume of ...

Article

Stefano Ajani

revised by Bianca Maria Antolini

(b c1643; d Feb 1, 1727). Italian publisher, printer and bookseller. From 1676 he was a member of the Venetian Printers' Guild, and in the same year he began printing thanks to the financial support of the composer Natale Monferrato, maestro di cappella of S Marco, publishing his Salmi concertati a 2 voci con violini e senza (op.11). He conducted his business, under the sign of King David playing the harp, at S Giovanni Grisostomo in the house of Monferrato. On the composer's death in 1685, Sala became the sole proprietor of the firm. In 1682 he published, anonymously, L’armonia sonora delle sonate, an anthology, edited by himself, of 12 sonatas for two violins and basso continuo by various composers.

An Indice dell’opere di musica sin hora stampate da Giuseppe Sala in Venezia (?1714) enumerates his output of psalms, motets, cantatas and sonatas, in particular those of Bassani, Monferrato, Giulio Taglietti and Corelli; he published at least 14 editions of Corelli’s first five opus numbers. The index also shows that he published psalms by Sartorio, D.F. Rossi, Cazzati and F.M. Benedetti, motets by Legrenzi, G.B. Allegri, Bonporti, G.M. Bononcini and Gasparini, cantatas by Caldara, G.L. Gregori and Albinoni and sonatas by G.B. Vitali, Legrenzi, de Castro, Corelli, Torelli, Ercole Bernabei and Benedetto Marcello. Altogether Sala printed 151 publications between ...