4,641-4,660 of 57,944 results

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Bazara  

Stamping tube of the Shambala people of Tanzania.

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Scott Wheeler

(b Evanston, IL, June 4, 1922; d New York, Aug 2, 1995). American composer. After graduating from DePaul University (BA 1944, MA 1945), he studied with Milhaud at Mills College (1946–8) and then settled in New York in 1948, where he received numerous fellowships, honours and commissions. His music is in the tradition of urban American expressionism, with audible antecedents in the works of Varèse and Ruggles but with a distinctive angular simplicity, characterized by dramatic alternations between violence and tenderness. Bazelon’s language, while influenced by serialism, borrows the jabbing brass and percussion chords and the propulsive rhythms of big-band jazz. This driving energy is contrasted with moments of relative repose in which orchestral colours are subtly varied....

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Bazin  

Philip J. Kass

Family of French bow makers. François Bazin (b Mirecourt, France, 10 May 1824; d Mirecourt, 1 Aug 1865) worked primarily for the trade in a style much influenced by Peccatte and Maire. His son Charles Nicolas (b Mirecourt, 24 April 1847; d...

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Gérard Streletski

(b Marseilles, Sept 4, 1816; d Paris, July 2, 1878). French composer, teacher and conductor. He became a student at the Paris Conservatoire in 1834, and studied composition with Henri-Montan Berton and Halévy. He won premiers prix for harmony and accompaniment (1836...

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Darcy Kuronen

(b Boston, MA, March 29, 1798; d Canton, MA, Jan 5, 1883). American inventor, designer, and maker of free-reed instruments. He was a son of French Huguenot parents who came to Boston in 1788; his father, trained as a watchmaker, made and sold hardware, and no doubt Bazin gained from his father an interest in mechanics. His instruments had limited influence on later manufacturers, but are among the earliest of their type made in the USA. About ...

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Vladimír Godár

(b Partizánska L’upča, April 12, 1931). Slovak composer and pianist. He began his music education at the Bratislava State Conservatory, where he studied the piano with Anna Kafendová (1946–51). He then read mathematics at Prague University (until 1956) and studied privately with Jiři Eliáš (composition), Rauch and Moravec (piano). After returning to Bratislava he studied with Cikker at the College of Performing Arts (...

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Bazuna  

Slightly conical wooden horn from the Kaszuby region of Poland. The name possibly comes from German Posaune. It is commonly made from alder or spruce in two rejoined halves in the manner of an alphorn, about 1 to 1.5 metres long, and produces four to eight harmonics. It is traditionally played by shepherds and fishermen. Similar Polish instruments include the ...

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Zygmunt M. Szweykowski

(b Sieradz, c1535; d 1600). Polish writer, poet, composer and printer. In printed volumes of music he was referred to as ‘C. B.’ and ‘C.S.’; on 1 September 1557 he was knighted and admitted to the family of Heraklides Jakub Basilikos. He studied at Kraków Academy in ...

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Julia Ann Griffin

(b ?Parma, c1650; d Piacenza, c1700). Italian composer and teacher. He was the son of one of Duke Ranuccio Farnese’s servants. On the duke’s recommendation he was elected maestro di cappella of Piacenza Cathedral on 16 June 1679 and held the post until at least ...

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(b Lovere; d Bergamo, 1639). Composer, organist and singer. He became a chaplain at S Maria Maggiore, Bergamo, in 1610 and sang in the choir until 1611. He was an organist at nearby Desio in 1628. In that year he published at Venice a volume of ...

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Giovanni Carli Ballola and Roberta Montemorra Marvin

(b Brescia, March 11, 1818; d Milan, Feb 10, 1897). Italian violinist, composer and teacher. He was a pupil of a Brescian violinist, Faustino Camisani (Camesani); encouraged by Paganini, he began his concert career at an early age and became one of the most highly regarded artists of his time. From ...

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(b Lovere, 1593; d Bergamo, April 15, 1660). Italian singer, theorbo player, organist and composer, younger brother of Natale Bazzini. He studied at the seminary and at the Accademia della Mia at Bergamo, where he gained a reputation as an excellent singer. He studied composition with Giovanni Cavaccio and in ...

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Bbare  

Free-reed aerophone of the Koho people of central Vietnam, akin to the dding klut. It has a single pipe with three fingerholes, which is attached with wax to a gourd windchest.

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Adrienne Fried Block and E. Douglas Bomberger

(b Henniker, NH, Sept 5, 1867; d New York, NY, Dec 27, 1944). American composer and pianist. She was the first American woman to succeed as a composer of large-scale art music and was celebrated during her lifetime as the foremost woman composer of the United States. A descendant of a distinguished New England family, she was the only child of Charles Abbott Cheney, a paper manufacturer and importer, and Clara Imogene (Marcy) Cheney, a talented amateur singer and pianist. At the age of one she could sing 40 tunes accurately and always in the same key; before the age of two she improvised alto lines against her mother’s soprano melodies; at three she taught herself to read; and at four she mentally composed her first piano pieces and later played them, and could play by ear whatever music she heard, including hymns in four-part harmony. The Cheneys moved to Chelsea, Massachusetts, about ...

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Rob C. Wegman

American rock band. It was formed in 1961 in Hawthorne, California, by the Wilson brothers Brian (Brian Douglas Wilson; b Hawthorne, CA, 20 June 1942; vocals, piano and bass guitar), Dennis (Dennis Carl Wilson; b Hawthorne, CA, 4 Dec 1944; d Marina del Ray, 28 Dec 1983...

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Malcolm Boyd

Opera in three acts, op.83, by Alun Hoddinott to a libretto by Glyn Jones after Robert Louis Stevenson’s short story; Cardiff, New Theatre, 26 March 1974.

Wiltshire (baritone) and Case (baritone) are traders on a South Sea island. Case finds a half-caste bride for Wiltshire in Uma (mezzo-soprano) and then puts it about that she had been promised to one of the native chiefs. The islanders refuse to trade with Wiltshire, but with the help of the priest, Father Galuchet (tenor), he finds and destroys the voodoo shrine which is the source of Case’s power over the natives. Case confronts him, reveals his own complicity in the deaths of previous traders, and is killed by Wiltshire. The music combines an evenly paced arioso style with vivid orchestral writing....

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Adrienne Fried Block

(b Henniker, NH, Sept 5, 1867; d New York, Dec 27, 1944). American composer and pianist. She was the first American woman to succeed as a composer of large-scale art music and was celebrated during her lifetime as the foremost woman composer of the USA. A descendant of a distinguished New England family, she was the only child of Charles Abbott Cheney, a paper manufacturer and importer, and Clara Imogene (Marcy) Cheney, a talented amateur singer and pianist. At the age of one she could sing 40 tunes accurately and always in the same key; before the age of two she improvised alto lines against her mother's soprano melodies; at three she taught herself to read; and at four she mentally composed her first piano pieces and later played them, and could play by ear whatever music she heard, including hymns in four-part harmony. The Cheneys moved to Chelsea, Massachusetts, about ...

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George N. Heller and Alan L. Spurgeon

(b Weedsport, NY, Sept 20, 1871; d Emporia, KS, Jan 21, 1935). American music educator. He studied at the School of Fine Arts, Syracuse University (1890–93) and the University of Michigan (BA 1895). Beach also studied singing at the Juliana School of Opera in Paris (from ...

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Elizabeth A. Wright

(b Gloversville, NY, Oct 11, 1877; d Pasadena, CA, Nov 6, 1953).

American composer. A pupil of George Whitefield Chadwick, he studied piano at the New England Conservatory, Boston. In 1900 he obtained a position as a piano teacher at the Northwestern Conservatory, Minneapolis, and from ...

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Barry Kernfeld

(b Redlands, CA, Sept 14, 1908; d San Diego, July 31, 1991). American pianist, brother of Eddie Beal. Rusch (1981) discovered his birthdate; his place of birth and full name, and a confirmation of the date, appear on his application for a social security card, while the date of his death is taken from the social security death index. As a child he studied classical music for many years and played with his mother, father, and brother in a family orchestra, mainly at church affairs; when he was in high school he began working professionally in popular-music settings. After attending the University of Redlands (in Redlands, California) he played in Los Angeles with Speed Webb (...