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(b Redlands, CA, June 13, 1910; d Los Angeles, Dec 15, 1984). American pianist and songwriter, brother of Charlie Beal. He took piano lessons from his mother and studied violin and percussion in school. In 1930 he went to Los Angeles as a drummer but a year later changed to piano, and in the early 1930s played with the bandleaders Earl Dancer and Charlie Echols. From ...

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Anne Beetem Acker

Australian piano firm founded by Octavius Beale (b Mountmellick, Co. Laois, Ireland, 23 Feb 1850; d Stroud, New South Wales, Australia, 16 Dec 1930). Beale came to Australia with his family in 1854. Having been sent back to Ireland for schooling, he returned and was working in a hardware store in Melbourne at age 16. Later he became a partner with Hugo Wertheim in a hardware business that imported sewing machines and German upright pianos. In ...

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Niall O’Loughlin

(fl London, 1643–80). English trumpet maker and court trumpeter. A medallion, dated by Byrne to 1643, shows ‘SIMON BEAL AET SVAE 28A’ holding a trumpet with a distinctive three-lobed ball on the bell pipe, possibly the earliest evidence of this English feature. Beale is known from two references in Pepys’s diary and other contemporary documents. He was said to work in Suffolk Street, London. In ...

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W.H. Husk and William Barclay Squire

(b Landrake, Jan 1, 1784; d London, May 3, 1854). English organist and composer. He was brought up in London as a chorister of Westminster Abbey under Samuel Arnold and Robert Cooke. After his voice broke he served as a midshipman. In 1813...

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Beamer  

Jay W. Junker

Hawaiian family of musicians. The Beamer family has produced significant performers, composers, and teachers across the spectrum of Hawaiian music genres, from chant and hula to art song, falsetto singing, and slack key. They trace their musical lineage back to the 15th century when mele oli...

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Beaming across bar-lines (Beethoven, Piano Sonata op.10 no.3; Vienna: Eder, 1798)

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Beaming across bar-lines throughout to show cross-rhythms (Schumann, ‘Paganini’, from ‘Carnaval’ op.9; Leipzig: Breitkopf & Härtel, 1837)

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Sophie Fuller

(b London, Aug 26, 1956). English composer and viola player, active in Scotland. Though drawn to composition, she studied the violin and the viola at the RNCM and worked for around ten years as a viola player with several London ensembles. In 1986...

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Géza Gábor Simon and Rainer E. Lotz

(b Budapest, Aug 7, 1912; d Budapest, Jan 11, 1984). Hungarian drummer and vibraphonist. He studied violin and piano, but later changed to drums and vibraphone; he was strongly influenced by Lionel Hampton. From 1932 until the end of his life he played in most of the big bands and small groups led by Lajos Martiny, making many recordings in the period ...

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Anne Beetem Acker

Interactive laser music controller made by Human Beams, Inc., also known as Beamz Interactive, Inc., based in Scottsdale, Arizona. The firm was cofounded in 2001 by the rock musician Paul Riopelle and the Beamz’s inventor, Jerry [Gerald Henry] Riopelle, also a rock musician and record producer. Todor Fay and Melissa Jordan Grey developed the controlling software. The Beamz system was first released in late ...

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Bean  

Nickname of Coleman Hawkins.

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Norman Mongan

(b Philadelphia, Dec 26, 1933). American electric guitarist. He grew up in a musical family, and gained early experience playing with a minor group in and around Philadelphia. He worked with Charlie Ventura in 1956, then in 1958 moved to the West Coast and performed and recorded in Los Angeles with many leading groups, including those of Buddy Collette, Buddy DeFranco, Paul Horn, and Bud Shank. Two albums that he made as a leader with John Pisano in ...

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Mike Hazeldine

(b Grinnell, IA, Aug 30, 1904; d Cedar Rapids, IA, March 9, 1974). American pianist. After leading his own group (1919) he worked at the Linwood Inn in Davenport, Iowa (1923), where Bix Beiderbecke sometimes played informally with the band. In ...

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Noël Goodwin

(b Beckenham, Sept 22, 1929; d Dec 26, 2003). English violinist. After lessons from his father, he became a pupil of Albert Sammons when nine years old, later also attending the RCM. A further year’s study with André Gertler at the Brussels Conservatory on a Boise Foundation travelling award brought him a double first prize for solo and chamber music playing, and with two other prizewinners he formed the Boise Trio. He joined the RCM teaching staff in ...

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Thane Tierney

German record company. It was established in a farmhouse just outside of Bremen in the former West Germany by musicologist/collector Richard Weize in 1975. The company’s name and logo were taken from an engraving Weize found in a 1898 encyclopedia. While the first record released on the imprint was ...

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Michael Kennedy

Extravaganza in one act by William Walton to a libretto by Paul Dehn and Walton after a vaudeville by Anton Pavlovich Chekhov; Aldeburgh, Jubilee Hall, 3 June 1967.

Madam Popova (mezzo-soprano), an attractive widow, is reproved by her manservant Luka (bass) for prolonging her period of mourning: she should start to go out again. Life is over, she says; she will mourn for the rest of her life. Luka points out that her husband had not been faithful and scarcely deserved this devotion. She should have the horse Toby put into harness and call on the neighbours. No, Popova replies, give Toby an extra bag of oats. Her reveries about the past are interrupted by Smirnov (baritone), who has forced his way in. He is a landowner and wants immediate payment of ...

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David Fuller

Arrangement, transcription. In the compound, Choralbearbeitung, German usage allows for a much broader range of meaning than the English equivalents would suggest, and has embraced any cantus-firmus composition based on either plainchant or a hymn tune (both are Choral in German), whether it be medieval organum or a Bach chorale prelude for organ. More recently, however, there has been a tendency to restrict the term ...

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Beard  

Device for modifying and stabilizing the speech of narrow-scaled flue pipes in organs. It is usually a cylindrical dowel positioned between the ears flanking the mouth, or a bar connecting the ears at the bottom. It acts passively on the flow of wind past the languid. A type of beard known as ...

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Mark Gilbert

(b Philadelphia, Aug 26, 1960). American pianist and keyboard player. He studied privately with George Shearing and attended the Indiana University School of Music (1978–84, BM). After moving to New York (1985) he toured with John McLaughlin (1986, 1988...

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Winton Dean

(b c1717; d Hampton, 5 Feb 1791). English tenor. Trained by Bernard Gates at the Chapel Royal, he sang while still a boy in Handel’s Esther (staged at the crown and Anchor in February 1732). He won immediate success on his operatic début as Silvio in ...