4,681-4,700 of 57,944 results

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Martin Bernheimer and Stephanie Jensen-Moulton

(b Lansing, MI, Dec 25, 1927). American soprano. After studying at Michigan State University and the Juilliard School, Beardslee made her New York debut in December 1949. At Juilliard she met composer Jacques-Louis Monod, whom she later married. With Monod, she presented premieres of a number of American works, becoming known as a specialist in 20th-century music, and giving the first American performances of works by Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Krenek, and Alban Berg. In ...

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Beare  

Charles Beare and Margaret Campbell

English family of violin dealers and restorers. John Beare (1847–1928) became an instrument dealer in 1865. He was a friend of Elgar and published some of his early music in the 1880s. In 1892 he divided his business into two parts: Beare & Son, with his elder son Walter, at 32 Rathbone Place, London, and Beare, Goodwin & Co. at 186 Wardour Street. Beare & Son, later came under the direction of Walter’s son Richard Barrington Beare (...

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James Chute

(b Boston, May 29, 1954). American composer. A percussionist with the Greater Boston Youth SO, he conducted the orchestra in the première performance of his first orchestral work, Antigone (1972). He studied composition with Arnold Franchetti before entering Yale University, where his teachers included Jacob Druckman, Toru Takemitsu, Earle Brown and Yehudi Wyner (BA ...

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(b Louisville, KY, 1908). American drummer. While studying at Wilberforce (Ohio) University he joined Horace Henderson’s Collegians (1924); he continued to work with Henderson in the years 1924 to 1928 and stayed with the band when it was taken over by Benny Carter at New York’s Savoy Ballroom in ...

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Beastie Boys on stage at Montreux rock festival, Switzerland, 1987.

Mirrorpix/Lebrecht Authors

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David Toop and Jared Pauley

Rap group. Critically acclaimed and commercially popular, the Beastie Boys are arguably the most successful white group in rap music history. Having sold in excess of forty million albums worldwide, they are known for groundbreaking music videos and for incorporating a wide range of influences, including rock, funk, punk, and R&B into their overall sound....

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A 17th-century English term for one of several Ornaments : a lower appoggiatura (indicated by an ascending oblique line placed before or over the main note), an inverted trill (indicated by a wavy line over the main note), or a mordent (called ‘beat’ only in the 18th century)....

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An acoustical phenomenon. See Beats .

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The basic pulse underlying mensural music, that is, the temporal unit of a composition; also the movement of the hand or baton by which the conductor indicates that unit. The grouping of strong and weak beats into larger units constitutes Metre; see also Downbeat, Upbeat...

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Beat  

Barry Kernfeld

The basic pulse underlying measured music and thus the unit by which musical time is reckoned; the beat, though not always sounded, is always perceived as underpinning the temporal progress of the music, and it is only the presence of the beat that allows rhythm to be established. This article describes the ways in which the beat is expressed in jazz, and the relationship between the underlying pulse and the rhythms played by jazz musicians....

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Allan F. Moore

A style of British pop music developed in the early 1960s; it was significant as the first time musicians of that country had created their own sound, rather than imitating the US originals. In Liverpool, Merseybeat was spearheaded by the Beatles, whose early style grafted onto a skiffle base the instrumental and vocal textures, melodic structures, syncopated rhythms and responsorial vocal styles of early rock and roll, the modality and verse–refrain form of Anglo-Celtic folk song, and some ornamental chromaticisms and triadic parallelisms from late 19th-century European harmony. Other leading exponents included Gerry and the Pacemakers and the Searchers. The Beatles’ insistence on writing their own material was a novel redivision of labour which has had lasting consequences. In London an alternative approach was dominated by the Rolling Stones, the Kinks and the Who, in which a narrower amalgam was found, with the skiffle and rock and roll foundation partly replaced by a harder-edged rhythm and blues sound, in a selfconscious attempt at authenticity. In the USA the term ‘British invasion’ is preferred to ‘beat’, calling attention to the flood of such bands as these into the US market during the period ...

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Marie Fitzpatrick

(b Streetly, Staffs, Dec 17, 1937). British composer and teacher. She studied at Birmingham University between 1956 and 1964 (BMus 1960, MA 1968) and with Alexander Goehr. During the 1960s she worked as a freelance horn player and as a music lecturer at colleges of education; in ...

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Oliver Wang

A colloquial term synonymous with Hip hop production, referring to the creation of musical and rhythmic tracks or “beats” in hip-hop music. Whereas in other musical genres the figure of “the producer” often refers more to an overseer and coordinator of the larger recording process, in hip hop the producer/beat-maker is generally presumed to create, compose, and/or arrange the music for a recording. Throughout its history, beat-making has inherently reflected adaptations to technological innovations—including the ...

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Graham Hair and Greta Mary Hair

(b nr Bundaberg, Queensland, Nov 19, 1932). Australian composer. She studied at the Sydney Conservatorium with Frank Hutchens and at the Queensland Conservatorium, where she was later appointed lecturer and accompanist (1969). She represented women composers of Australia at the 3rd International Congress on Women in Music, Mexico City (...

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Annie Randall

The term refers to the extraordinary zealotry of Beatles fans during the Liverpool band’s first flush of international fame, initially appearing in British newspapers in late 1963. It was soon adopted in North America as well to refer to fans’ seemingly insatiable desire for Beatles products—records (both 45s and LPs), concert tickets, fan magazines, or objects imprinted with the Beatles’ logo or images of the performers. This was exceeded only by fans’ demand for personal contact with the performers; typically, highly demonstrative crowds would cluster around the stage door of concert venues, television studios, and radio stations wherever and whenever the band was expected. The Beatles were also greeted by hordes of ardent fans at airports around the world, notably at JFK Airport in February of ...

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Beatles fans outside the Plaza Hotel, New York, 1964.

AP Photo

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Ian MacDonald

English pop group. Ringo Starr (Richard Starkey; b Liverpool, July 7, 1940; drums, voice), John Lennon (John Winston Lennon; b Liverpool, 9 Oct 1940; d New York, 8 Dec 1980; rhythm guitar, keyboards, harmonica, voice), Paul McCartney (James Paul McCartney; b Liverpool, 18 June 1942...

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Walter Everett

English pop group. George Harrison (b Liverpool, England, Feb 25, 1943; d Los Angeles, Nov 29, 2001), John Lennon (John Winston (Ono) Lennon; b Liverpool, Oct 9, 1940; d New York, Dec 8, 1980), Paul McCartney (James Paul McCartney; b Liverpool, June 18, 1942...

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Simon Maguire, Elizabeth Forbes and Julian Budden

Tragedia lirica in two acts by vincenzo Bellini to a libretto by felice Romani after Carlo Tedaldi-Fores’s play Beatrice di Tenda; Venice, Teatro La Fenice, 16 March 1833.

By 24 May 1832 Bellini had agreed to write another opera for La Fenice, for which he had composed ...

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D. Kern Holoman

Opéra in two acts by Hector Berlioz to his own libretto after William Shakespeare ’s Much Ado about Nothing; Baden-Baden, Theater der Stadt, 9 August 1862.

The celebrated overture, though not a pot-pourri in the usual sense, characterizes the substance of the opera by alluding to quite a number of passages to follow. The first act takes place in the garden of Léonato [Leonato] (spoken), governor of Messina in Sicily. The townspeople rejoice that the invading Moors have fled from Don Pedro (bass) and his force. Soon the victors will be home, and Héro [Hero] (soprano) will be reunited with her intended, Claudio (baritone). Less pleased is Béatrice [Beatrice] (soprano), her cousin, to contemplate the return of Bénédict [Benedick] (tenor), with whom she has long enjoyed ‘a kind of merry war’. Those so far assembled dance a ...