4,721-4,740 of 57,944 results

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(b Paris, 30 or Aug 31, 1748; d Paris, 1813). French singer and composer. Having specialized from the age of seven in soubrette roles in comedies, she made a successful début at the Paris Opéra on 27 November 1766, replacing Sophie Arnould in the title role of ...

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(b Chenou, Château-Landon, between ?1475 and 1490; d Rome, May 22, 1542). French composer. His sobriquet, which appears with his music to the exclusion of his family name, reflects his origin in the region of Beauce. He became a member of the Ste Chapelle, Paris, in ...

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David Hiley

City in France. It is the diocesan seat in the archdiocese of Reims. It was the capital of the Bellovaci Gauls until Julius Caesar’s conquest in 57 bce; the Normans overran it in 851 and 861. The last reference to a lay Count of Beauvais occurs in ...

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Godelieve Spiessens

(b Lille, 1575; d Veurne, West Flanders, between 26 Feb and June 27, 1623). Franco-Flemish composer and priest. On 28 May 1593 he became phonascus at the St Walburga, Veurne; he also had to attend a number of services each day and to conduct Mass four times a week. At the yearly renewals of his post he was frequently reprimanded for negligence and later for drunkenness also. From ...

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David Fuller and Bruce Gustafson

(b Lyons, July 3, 1766; d Paris, Sept 7, 1834). French composer and organist, son of Jean-Jacques Beauvarlet-Charpentier. Unlike his father, he published under the name ‘Beauvarlet-charpentier’, although in official documents he was known as ‘Beauvarlet, dit Charpentier’. Survivancier of his father at St Paul in the Marais before the Revolution, he rode comfortably through the political upheavals, serving as organist of the Théophilanthropes and at the Temple de la Reconnaissance (...

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David Fuller and Bruce Gustafson

(b Abbeville, June 28, 1734; d Paris, May 6, 1794). French composer and organist. He was one of the most celebrated organists of the late 18th century. His father was Jean-Baptiste Beauvarlet (d Lyons, 1763), merchant dyer according to the baptismal certificate (Servières) and organist and instrument maker (Vallas). It is not known why he added the name Charpentier, but it was under that name alone that most of his compositions were published. He succeeded his father as organist of the Hospice de la Charité in Lyons and married Marie Birol, a singer who became known in Lyons and Paris under her husband’s name; they had a daughter (...

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String quartet founded in 1955.

See Tarack, Gerald.

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Tully Potter

American piano trio. It was formed in New York in 1955 by the pianist Menahem Pressler (b Magdeburg, 16 Dec 1923), the violinist Daniel Guilet and the cellist Bernard Greenhouse. Encouraged by Robert Casadesus, in whose house they rehearsed, the three made a sensational début at the Berkshire Music Festival in Tanglewood; and in autumn ...

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Bęben  

Zbigniew J. Przerembski

Term for different types of Polish drums struck with drumsticks. The main types are a single-headed frame drum with jingles or small bells attached (also known as the bębenek, ‘small drum’), widespread in Poland; and a cylindrical two-headed braced drum found largely in the Kalisz region, where it was formerly made from a hollowed log. Such drums are used in various kinds of ensemble, usually with fiddles, in some regions with the bass fiddle but at least since the 19th century never with bagpipes....

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Bebende  

Andrew C. McGraw

Suspended bronze gong of Bali. It is found in the gamelan gong gede, gamelan beleganjur, and gamelan gong kebyar ensembles. Examples range from 40 to 50 cm in diameter with a 25-cm-deep flange and a low, central boss 12 cm in diameter. The boss is surrounded by a slightly sunken ring, so that the top of the boss is about level with the face of the instrument. The depressed boss decreases decay time and produces a muted tone with an indistinct fundamental. The ...

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Walter Blankenburg

(fl 1610–20). German composer. All that is known of Beber, who described himself as a ‘musician of Naumburg’, is that he worked there in the first quarter of the 17th century. He is important for a St Mark Passion that he sent to the town council of Delitzsch in ...

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Margaret J. Kartomi

Hornpipe of the Gayo in the Takengon area of Central Aceh, Sumatra. Its rice-stalk pipe, about 3 mm wide and 20 cm long, has an idioglot single beating reed cut near the top and a horn-shaped bell made of wound strips of green pandan palm leaf attached to the lower end. As its pitch and tuning are not fixed, the four to six fingerholes are not uniformly placed. Circular breathing (...

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Gregory F. Barz

(b Douala, Cameroon, July 16, 1929; d Paris, May 28, 2001). Cameroonian composer, writer and musician. He studied mathematics in Douala and continued to study English at the Sorbonne, Paris, and is perhaps best known for his comprehensive guide to African music, first published in French as ...

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Bernarr Rainbow

A short-lived seven-step Solmization system published by Daniel Hitzler in Extract aus der Neuen Musica oder Singkunst (Nuremberg, 1623). Permanently related to the octave on A, the vocables ran la–be–ce–de–me–fe–ge, each pitch name incorporating an alphabetical note name. The chromatic scale was notated as shown in ex.1. The system took its name from the two forms of B....

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Bebization: Ex.1

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Gary W. Kennedy

Group formed by the saxophonist Mel Martin in the San Francisco Bay area in 1983. Its other members were the trumpeter and flugelhorn player Warren Gales, the saxophonist John Handy, the pianist George Cables, the double bass player Frank Tusa, and the drummer Eddie Marshall. Cables left the group in the late 1980s, although he took part in two recording sessions in ...

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English group led by Bill Le Sage from 1970 to 1986.

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Bebung  

Edwin M. Ripin and G. Moens-Haenen

(1) A vibrato obtained on the clavichord by alternately increasing and decreasing the pressure of the finger on the key. The effect is described by a number of mid-18th-century writers, notably Mattheson (‘tremolo’), F.W. Marpurg and C.P.E. Bach. Bach (1753) wrote that it should be used on long ...

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Bebung beben: ‘to tremble’ balancement : Ex.1

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Patrick O’Connor

(b Toulon, Oct 24, 1927; d Toulon, December 18, 2001). French composer and singer. He studied at the Nice and Toulon conservatories and during World War II was active in the Résistance (Maquis) in Savoie. He began composing songs in 1948, which were taken up by popular singers including Marie Bizet and Edith Piaf, who sang his ...