4,761-4,780 of 57,944 results

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Larry Wolz

(b Ilmeneau, Thuringia, April 16, 1850; d San Antonio, TX, Oct 2, 1920). American conductor of German origin. Perhaps the “Father of the Orchestra in Texas,” Beck was conductor of the Beethoven Männerchor in San Antonio (1884–1904; 1919–20). Statewide he established orchestras for the Texas Sängerfests (...

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Neil Lerner

(b Montreal, QC, Canada, Jan 9, 1969). Canadian composer of television and film scores. After taking private music lessons and playing with rock bands, he attended Yale University (BA 1992) where he studied music composition and wrote two musicals and an opera. He then studied at the University of Southern California’s film scoring program (...

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Christoph Keller

(b Lohn, canton of Schaffhausen, June 16, 1901; d Basle, Oct 31, 1989). Swiss composer and radio producer. After studying mechanical engineering for a short time at the Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich, and taking private music lessons from Müller-Zürich, he attended the Zürich Conservatory, where his teachers included Volkmar Andreae (composition), Reinhold Laquai (counterpoint) and Carl Baldegger (piano). In ...

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Anneliese Downs and Philippe Vendrix

(b Mannheim, Feb 20, 1734; d Bordeaux, Dec 31, 1809). German composer, conductor, violinist and organist, active in France. He received violin lessons from his father Johann Aloys Beck (d 27 May 1742), an oboist and choir school Rektor at the Palatine court whose name is listed in the calendars of ...

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Margaret Cranmer

(fl 1756–98). German piano maker, active in London. He left Germany for England sometime after 1756, and the rate books of St James’s, Westminster, show that he settled at a house in Broad Street, London, from midsummer 1771 until the end of 1798...

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Stan Britt and Barry Kernfeld

(b London, Sept 16, 1938). English pianist. Horricks (1988) reports that Beck was born in 1938, not 1936, as given in a number of reference sources. His father played violin and gave him lessons on classical piano between the ages of 12 and 15. While working as a draftsman he began a career as a jazz player, sitting in with groups during a period in Canada (...

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Ian D. Bent

(b Gebweiler, Alsace, Aug 14, 1881; d Philadelphia, June 23, 1943). Alsatian philologist and musicologist. Beck studied in Paris and later in Strasbourg, where he took the doctorate in 1907. His dissertation formed the first part of his Die Melodien der Troubadours und Trouvères...

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Susan Fast

(b Wallington, Surrey, June 24, 1944). English blues-rock guitarist. Along with Jimi Hendrix and Led Zeppelin's Jimmy Page, he pioneered hard-rock and heavy-metal guitar playing. He played with the Yardbirds, the (1965–7), then created the Jeff Beck Group, which went through several personnel changes, the earliest including Rod Stewart (vocals) and Ron Wood (bass). The album ...

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John Bass

(b Philadelphia, PA, July 29, 1945; d Woodbury, CT, July 22, 2008). American guitarist, composer, and producer. After graduating from high school, he moved to New York and played with a jazz trio in the club Chuck’s Compository. He also worked as a studio musician and jingle writer, which eventually led to collaborations with Gil Evans. Beck was among the first jazz guitarists to incorporate rock guitar techniques, including the use of a distorted tone, into his playing. He was also a key figure in the fusion movement of the 1970s, along with the Brecker Brothers and David Sanborn. In ...

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J.H. Alexander

(b Cleveland, OH, Sept 12, 1856; d Cleveland, May 26, 1924). American conductor, composer and violinist. He studied at the Leipzig Conservatory from 1879 to 1882, and made his European début as a violinist at the Leipzig Gewandhaus in his own String Quartet in C minor. On his return to Cleveland he continued activity with the Schubert String Quartet, which he organized in ...

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Erik Kjellberg and Paul Whitehead

(fl 1650–70). German composer, editor and musician. He is known to have been the principal musicus ordinarius in Frankfurt. He was nominated in 1650 but was expelled a few years later for indecent behaviour; he returned to the position in 1670. His name is connected with two collections of dance music for four-part string ensemble and basso continuo. ...

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Elizabeth Forbes

(b Budapest, May 5, 1827; d Bratislava, April 9, 1904). Hungarian baritone. He studied in Vienna and made his début in 1851 as the Speaker (Die Zauberflöte) at the Hofoper, where he was engaged from 1853 for over 30 years. He sang Don Giovanni at the opening of the new Opera (...

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Richard Wigmore

(b Vienna, 1814; d Vienna, March 4, 1879). Austrian tenor. After studying with Joseph Staudigl, he began his career in Prague in 1838. He subsequently had great success in St Petersburg, where he was dubbed ‘the king of tenors’. In 1848 Beck was engaged at the Hoftheater in Weimar, where he created the title role in Wagner’s ...

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Wim van Eyle

(b The Hague, Sept 18, 1925). Dutch pianist and singer. She is self-taught as a musician. She sang with a Hawaiian vocal group, the Samoa Girls (1939–42), sang and played piano with the Dutch group the Miller Sextet (1944–9), and appeared in shows sponsored by the USO. From ...

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James B. Kopp

(b Heidenheim, Germany, March 16, 1944). German maker of early wind instruments. He played the flute from age 11. In 1961 he passed the journeyman’s examination as a precision mechanic and worked until 1965 in industry (for Carl Zeiss, Telefunken/AEG, and ELDATA). He passed the Abitur in ...

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Paula Morgan

(b New York, Sept 2, 1906; d Brattleboro, VT, April 7, 2001). American music scholar and librarian. He was educated at the College of the City of New York, New York University, the Institute of Musical Art and the Mannes College of Music; his studies included the violin and chamber music with Louis Sveçenski, composition with Bernard Wagenaar and Hans Weisse, and musicology with Sachs and Reese. From ...

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Martha Furman Schleifer

(b Philadelphia, PA, Dec 1811; d Philadelphia, PA, Feb 7, 1905). American organist and composer. From the age of thirteen he assisted his father, also an organist. Beckel worked in several Philadelphia churches including the Clinton Street Emanuel Church (Presbyterian) for over 50 years beginning in ...

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Gary W. Kennedy

(b New York, May 14, 1951). American alto saxophonist and leader. His mother was an opera singer and his father played boogie-woogie piano. He began piano lessons at the age of five and acquired his first saxophone when he was seven. While at school he played in various bands and formed a group with the keyboard player Jeremy Wall. He spent his final year of high school in Nuremberg, Germany, where he played in local funk bands. After returning to the United States he attended SUNY, Buffalo, and worked locally playing funk and blues; he graduated in ...

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Barry Kernfeld

(b New York, Aug 14, 1923). American alto and soprano saxophonist. He studied violin, then learned saxophone, clarinet, and flute. He began his professional career working at summer resorts in the Catskill Mountains (New York) in 1939 and joined the New York musicians’ union after graduating from Brooklyn Technical High School in ...

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Margaret Cranmer

Russian firm of piano makers. Jakob Becker (Yakov Davidovich Bekker) (b Neustadt an der Haardt; d St Petersburg, 1879) founded a small workshop in St Petersburg in 1841, which was taken over by his brother Franz Davidovich 20 years later. The Russian piano industry developed later and on a smaller scale than the European, and several Germans played a large part in establishing the industry at St Petersburg. Becker became one of the best and most successful piano manufacturers, although its output was lower than that of contemporary English, American or German firms, producing 200 pianos in ...