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Elizabeth Forbes

(b Fagnano, Udine, Nov 11, 1864; d Havana, Jan 1901). Italian soprano . She made her début in 1887 at Ferrara as Paolina (Poliuto) and in 1889 first sang at La Scala as Camille (Zampa). There she created Alice Ford in Verdi’s Falstaff (1893...

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Sophie Fuller

(Marie Jacobina)

(b Cologne, July 5, 1847; d London, Nov 14, 1925). English pianist and composer of German birth. Her family moved to England when she was a young child. From 1857 to 1864 she attended the RAM, studying the piano with Cipriani Potter and Ernst Pauer, and composition with Charles Steggall and George Macfarren (who later wrote his third piano sonata for her); she won the King’s Scholarship in 1860 and again in 1862. She made her professional début in 1863 at the Crystal Palace, where she performed two movements of Beethoven’s ‘Emperor’ Concerto. In 1865 she gave the first of a long-running series of recitals and chamber concerts at the Hanover Square Rooms, continued from 1875 at St James’s Hall. Zimmermann was praised for her clarity and control, and was regarded as one of the country’s leading pianists. She performed regularly at the Popular Concerts in London and accompanied Joachim (the dedicatee of her first violin sonata), Neruda and Alfredo Piatti; she also made several tours of Germany....

Article

Harold Rosenthal

(b Meissen, Nov 29, 1892; d Berlin, Feb 24, 1968). German tenor . He studied in Dresden, where he made his début in 1918. Engagements in Dortmund, Brunswick and Leipzig followed; from 1925 to 1931 he was a member of the Staatsoper in Munich, and from 1931 to 1934...

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Elizabeth Forbes

(b Buenos Aires, Aug 1942). Argentine mezzo-soprano. She studied in Buenos Aires, making her début in 1977 at the Teatro Colón as Gluck’s Orpheus, then singing Carmen and Ulrica at the Landestheater, Salzburg. She made her American début at Miami in 1979 as Delilah and her Covent Garden début in 1980 as Cherubino, and sang Rosina at San Francisco (1982). She has sung in Brussels, Naples, Madrid, Bologna, Venice, Geneva, Rome, Lyons and Paris. Her repertory includes Juno (Cavalli’s Ercole amante), Purcell’s Dido, Handel’s Agrippina and Julius Caesar, Dorabella, Idamantes, Zerlina, Sextus, Rosina (Haydn’s La vera costanza), Andromache (Ermione), Fricka and Lola. She created the title role of Piazzolla’s Maria di Buenos Aires (1987, Turcoing). Her beautiful, warm-toned voice, not large but well-projected, is particularly effective in French music: Berlioz’s Marguerite and Dido, and Massenet’s Charlotte, Dulcinée and Thérèse are among her finest roles, while she sang the Old Prioress (...

Article

Ziryāb  

Eckhard Neubauer

[Abū ’l-Ḥasan ‘Alī ibn Nāfi‘ ]

(b Iraq; d Córdoba, Spain, Aug 852). Arab musician . A mawlā (‘freedman’) of Caliph al-Mahdī (775–85) at Baghdad, he was a pupil of Ibrāhīm al-Mawṣilī and a rival of Isḥāq al-Mawṣilī at the court of Hārūn al-Rashīd (786–809). He left Baghdad for Syria, served the Aghlabid ruler Ziyādat Allāh (817–38) in Qairawan (Tunisia), and later received a generous welcome from ‘Abd al-Raḥmān II (822–52) in Córdoba. His influence there as a court musician and companion (nadīm) must have been exceptional: customs in clothing and eating that he had brought from Baghdad became fashionable, and the tradition of his school of music was maintained by his descendants at least two generations after his death. Like his contemporary al-Kindī he seems to have known the musical theory of late antiquity and to have reconciled it with the teachings of his masters in Baghdad. Details of his vocal training techniques are described by Ibn Ḥayyān (...

Article

David Cummings

(b Mobile, al , Aug 17, 1949). American soprano. She studied with Elena Nikolaidi at Florida State University and made her début at the Houston Opera in 1975, as Donna Elvira. She has appeared widely in North America as Fiordiligi and Pamina, and as Giulietta in I Capuleti e i Montecchi...

Article

Harry B. Lincoln

(b Rome, c1537; d Loreto, 1592). Italian composer and singer. He spent most of his life in Rome. After singing in the Cappella Giulia from 9 August 1558 until February 1561, he was maestro di cappella of S Luigi dei Francesi from 1561 to 1566. From 1567 to June 1570 he held a similar position at S Giovanni in Laterano, and during this period may also have been in the service of Cardinal Guglielmo Sirleto. On 5 July 1570 he joined the choir of the Cappella Sistina as an alto but, according to an entry in the Diario sistino for August 1577, was obliged to resign because of ill-health in July 1577. On 25 October 1577 he and Palestrina were appointed by Pope Gregory XIII to prepare a corrected edition of the Roman Graduale; Zoilo worked on the Proprium sanctorum and the Antiphonale. Because of lack of funds the project was abandoned in autumn ...

Article

(b Brescia, 1728; d Gámbara, nr Brescia, 1809). Italian bass . He was a successful singer in Italian opera houses from 1757, and in London, 1761–2. In 1763 he was hired by the Mannheim court of Elector Carl Theodor, where he particularly excelled in serious roles and also sang successfully in opera buffa. In 1769 he played at court a glass harmonica constructed by the court astronomer Father Christian Mayr. He was a guest performer at the Teatro S Benedetto in Venice in 1771. In 1778 he moved with the court to Munich, his last role there being Jupiter in Vogler's Castore e Polluce (1787). He retired to his estate in Gámbara in 1788. His final documented role was as Polpetta in Farinelli's La bandiera d'ogni vento (in Padua, 1800). Mozart commented favourably on Zonca's expressive singing in a letter of 27 December 1780, stating that he wished he had been able to create the part of Idomeneus for him. There is no conclusive evidence that he composed, although he may have written some of the works attributed to his brother (or uncle) Giuseppe Zonca. (...

Article

Elizabeth Forbes

(b Munich, Jan 24, 1869; d Dresden, Dec 11, 1941). German bass . The son of the bass-baritone Ludwig Zottmayr, he studied in Munich and began his career as a concert singer. After stage appearances in Vienna (1906) and in Prague (1908, Neues Deutsches Theater), he was engaged at Dresden from ...

Article

Elizabeth Forbes

(b Amberg, Bavaria, March 31, 1828; d Weimar, Oct 16, 1899). German bass-baritone . He made his début in 1855 at Nuremberg and was then engaged at Hamburg, Hanover and, in 1865, at the Munich Hofoper, where he remained until 1880. He sang King Mark in the first performance of ...

Article

Elizabeth Forbes

(b Berlin, March 29, 1800; d Berlin, July 7, 1876). German bass . He sang in the children’s chorus of the Berlin Hofoper, then in the regular chorus and in 1819 took on small parts there. After an engagement in Budapest, in 1826 he joined the Königstädtisches Theater, Berlin, making his début as Gaveston (...

Article

(b London, Jan 28, 1793; d Bologna, Feb 1879). Italian bass. The son of an Italian father and an English mother, he accompanied his family to Italy in 1803 and for a time studied painting. He eventually studied singing with Crescentini in Bologna, and in 1816 made his début at Ferrara, going in the same year to Munich, where he was engaged at the Hoftheater. In 1819 he sang in operas by Rossini and Guglielmi at the Kärntnertortheater, Vienna, returning to La Scala for Rossini’s La pietra del paragone, L’italiana in Algeri and La Cenerentola, in which Rossini thought him the best Don Magnifico he had heard. On 26 December 1820 Zucchelli sang in the Rome première of Pacini’s La gioventù di Enrico V. In 1821–2 he appeared in Trieste and in the following season he went to London, where he performed in the English première of Rossini’s ...

Article

Sergio Durante

( fl 1678–85). Italian soprano . She sang in Venice in 1678 in Carlo Pallavicino’s Vespasiano for the opening of the Teatro S Giovanni Grisostomo. Thereafter her name appears only in librettos of Neapolitan productions, including the first performances of Alessandro Scarlatti’s Aldimiro, o vero Favor per favore and Psiche, o vero Amore innamorato...

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Marcia J. Citron

(b Stuttgart, Dec 9, 1796; d Stuttgart, Aug 1, 1857). German composer, pianist, singer and teacher . The youngest of seven children born to the composer Johann Rudolf Zumsteeg, she studied the piano with Schlick and theory with Wilhelm Sutor. Gifted with a fine alto voice, she was soon singing and performing on the piano (e.g. at the Stuttgart Museumskonzerte). As an adult Zumsteeg mixed with leading musicians and poets. The literary ties reflected her interest in the lied, which formed the basis of her creative reputation. She also wrote several piano works, such as the early Trois polonaises, published in 1821 and favourably reviewed in the Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung, and sacred choral music. She occupied a central position in the musical life of Stuttgart as a teacher of voice and piano and as a leading member of the Verein für Klassische Kirchenmusik.

Zumsteeg’s lieder were still known in the late 19th century (Michaelis) but have not remained in the repertory. She composed about 60 songs. The six lieder of her op.6 received a brief but laudatory notice in the ...

Article

Hellmut Federhofer

(b Judenburg, Styria, c1545–50; d ?Graz, Styria, May 1582). Austrian singer and composer. He was chorister in the Stephansdom, Vienna, and in 1559 was admitted to the university there. In 1572 his name appears last in a list of five basses employed at the Graz court household of Archduke Karl II of Inner Austria. At the express wish of the archduke he took holy orders and in 1579, when he accompanied his master to Munich, he was nominated first court chaplain. He himself used the title ‘Elimosinarius’ (almoner) in 1581. All that has survived of his work is a Magnificat à 6, A la fontaine du pris (in A-Gu , D-Kl and SI-Lu, ed. in DTÖ, cxxxiii, 1981), based on the chanson with the same title by Willaert. This work shows Zweiller to have been among the earliest composers to write parody Magnificat settings, a style with which he had presumably become familiar through contact with Lassus at Munich....

Article

Andrew Lamb

[Mariel]

(b Pistyán, Hungary, July 13, 1876; d Vienna, 14/June 15, 1947). Austro-Hungarian soprano. She sang soubrette roles at the Carltheater in Vienna from 1901 to 1920, also appearing at the summer theatre in the Prater, the Raimundtheater and the Theater an der Wien. She was the original Franzi in Straus’s ...

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Robin A. Leaver

[Huldreich ]

(b Wildhaus, Jan 1, 1484; d Cappel, Oct 11, 1531). Swiss humanist and church reformer . Of all the reformers of the 16th century he was the most musically gifted and yet the most antagonistic towards the use of music in public worship. He was educated first in Basle, then in Berne where he came under the influence of the poet, composer and humanist scholar Wölflin. While in Berne, at the age of 12 Zwingli entered the chapel choir of the local monastery simply to further his musical ambitions. Many of his contemporaries (e.g. Bullinger and Myconius) commented on his extraordinary musical gifts. Wyss (see Finsler, 1901) wrote:

I have never heard about anyone who, in the musical arts – that is, in singing and all the instruments of music, such as lute, harp, large viol, small viol, pipes, German flute … the trumpet, dulcimer, cornett, and waldhorn, and whatever else of such like had been invented … could take it to hand as quickly as he....

Article

Alan Blyth

(b Landvarov, nr Vilnius, Jan 23, 1935). Polish soprano . She studied at Łódź and made her début in 1957 at Kraków as Halka. After winning the 1960 Munich radio prize she sang at Oberhausen, Dortmund (1962) and Düsseldorf (1965–70). She appeared as Octavian at Glyndebourne (1965), made her Covent Garden début in 1968 as Violetta, then sang Countess Almaviva, Donna Elvira and Desdemona, a role she took to La Scala in 1977. She made her Metropolitan début in 1968 as Donna Elvira; later roles there included Tatyana, Suor Angelica, Fiordiligi, Elsa (Lohengrin), Elisabeth (Tannhäuser), Marguerite, the Marschallin, Mimì, Tosca, Butterfly and Manon Lescaut. She sang throughout Europe and the USA, her repertory including Adriana Lecouvreur, Amelia (Un ballo in maschera), Leonora (Il trovatore), Liù, Lisa (The Queen of Spades), Maddalena de Coigny, and both the Composer and Ariadne. Zylis-Gara was also admired as a concert singer and recitalist. She was a dignified yet impassioned actress, and had a fresh, lyric voice, notable for its smoothness of production. Among her recordings are a radiant Composer under Kempe....