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Zuffolo  

J.A. Fuller Maitland, Anthony C. Baines and Mary Térey-Smith

In Italy a name for any small duct flute or whistle. It was first described in the 14th century (Marcuse, 1964) as having two front finger-holes and a rear thumb-hole (it thus falls into the normal pattern for three-hole pipes; see Pipe and tabor...

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(1) Slide, as in Zugposaune (slide Trombone) and Zugtrompete ( Slide trumpet)

(2) A draw-stop on an organ or harpsichord. A Zugärmchen is a roller arm; and a Zugdraht or Zugrute is a pull-down.

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Slide Trombone.

Article

Margaret Cranmer

(b Fürth, nr Nuremburg, June 14, 1726; bur. London, Dec 5, 1790). English harpsichord and piano maker of German origin. He may have worked for the Silbermanns and was the most famous of the German keyboard instrument makers known as the ‘12 Apostles’, who emigrated to London about the time of the Seven Years War. Zumpe worked briefly for Burkat Shudi, and married Elizabeth Beeston on ...

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Tongue, as in Zungenstoss or Zungenschlag; that is, an attack or stroke of the tongue (for further information see Tonguing).

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Zuoqing  

Alan R. Thrasher

Bowl-shaped resting bell of the Han Chinese. The bell is hammered out of bronze and constructed in various sizes, medium-sized instruments ranging from 10 to 15 cm in diameter. The zuoqing rests on a cushion and is struck at the rim with a padded beater. A 9th-century Buddhist bell (24 cm in diameter, 19 cm deep) found in a Tang dynasty site is one of earliest of this type reported. The scholar Chen Yang, in his treatise ...

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Zupu  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

End-blown gourd horn of the Sere people in the Uele region, Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is bulbous and about 35 cm long. (LaurentyA, 311)

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Zurnā  

Shawm of Turkey, Syria, Iraq, Armenia, Dagestan, Azerbaijan and Georgia. See Surnāy .

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Term first used by F.W. Marpurg (1755) for an Periodicals, .

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Zvans  

Valdis Muktupāvels

Cast and forged metal bells of Latvia. Small cast bronze bells are known from the 7th century, found by archaeologists attached to shawls, belts, and other parts of female costume, usually grouped in threes. The diameter of the opening is 15 to 30 mm, and the clapper in a form of a lamella is attached inside. Cast church bells are known in Latvia from the 12th century. The bell was hung in a church tower or a separate bell tower and rung for ecclesiastic rites, for special events such as weddings and funerals, and also to sound alarms. The church bells were thought to offer protection from evil influences....

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Žvegla  

Darja Koter

Transverse flute of Slovenia. It is made of plum heartwood, unpolished, in nine sizes from about 20 to 52 cm long, with the two longest flutes made in two parts. Žvegle are pitched at g”, f”, d♭”, c♯”, b’, a...

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Zvonce  

Ivan Mačak

Bells of Slovakia. There are many forms: zvonce drevené (wooden bells), zvonce liate (cast metal bells), plechové zvonce or spiežovce (bells of folded sheet metal), and zvonce hlinené (ceramic bells). Herders hang differently tuned bells on their animals so that in rough terrain they can locate them and know which animals are in front, behind, or in the middle of the group. Herders also pay attention to the harmony of the bells and sometimes say that they are ‘making a symphony.’...

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Organ builder. See Suisse.