57,881-57,900 of 57,944 results

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Zug ‘pull’ ‘draught’ ‘stress’ ‘procession’ ‘progression’: Ex.1

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Zug ‘pull’ ‘draught’ ‘stress’ ‘procession’ ‘progression’: Ex.2

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Slide Trombone.

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Frans van Rossum

(b Gouda, Sept 23, 1964). Dutch composer. He studied at the Rotterdam Conservatory with Philippe Boesmans and Klaas de Vries, and in Tanglewood with Knussen and Foss. In 1989 he won the Koussevitzky Composition Prize with Fishbone, which launched his international career. While being trained as a classical pianist, he played the guitar in punk bands, and his chameleon-like musical output reflects a natural affinity with the complex compositional procedures of serious music and the simple directness of rock music. Though Zuidam uses a multiplicity of genres and styles, both Western and non-Western, he alludes to his models rather than borrowing from them literally. In his music, which is vigorous and entertaining, rhythm plays a paramount role because ‘it forges the link between reason and emotion’. The communicative simplicity and formal transparency of his music stems from a desire for clear musical argument but involves elaborate transformational techniques. These facilitate the music’s change of perspective by shifting quickly but smoothly between disparate elements and emotions. Zuidam’s talents for twisting the obvious and predictable are considerable. In a way, his music reflects on ordinary perceptions. It is a critique in disguise, seriously humorous and biting, even as it pretends to be sentimental or downright vulgar. His opera ...

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James Chute and Jonas Westover

(b Cambridge, MA, Sept 25, 1944). American Flutist. She studied English at Barnard College (1962–4) before attending the Juilliard School, where she studied flute with Julius Baker (1964–6). In 1968 she married the violinist Pinchas Zukerman (they divorced in ...

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Noël Goodwin

(b Tel-Aviv, July 16, 1948). Israeli violinist of Polish descent. His father, also a violinist, encouraged a childhood instinct for music, and at eight he entered the Tel-Aviv Academy of Music, where he studied with Ilona Feher, a pupil of Hubay. In 1961...

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Michael Steinberg

(b Brooklyn, NY, 22 Oct 1943; d Hong Kong, 6 June 2017). American violinist and conductor. He started music lessons when he was three and studying the violin at the age of four. Two years later he first played in public, and at seven became a student of Galamian. He made his first orchestral appearance in 1953 with the New Haven SO, and a formal début recital at Carnegie Hall in 1956. He specialized in 20th-century music and had complete command of new and traditional virtuoso techniques. He gave the premières of concertos by Sessions (for violin, cello, and orchestra), Wuorinen (for amplified violin and orchestra), and the Scottish composer Iain Hamilton, and of works by Babbitt, Carter, Crumb, Wuorinen, and others. From 1963 to 1976 he performed frequently with the pianist Gilbert Kalish, with whom he was associated in a repertory of over 300 works. One of the original Creative Associates at the Center for Creative and Performing Arts, SUNY, Buffalo, in ...

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Jacques Aboucaya

(b Belgrade, Feb 2, 1968). Serbian pianist and composer. He discovered jazz in 1984 and quickly became one of the busiest pianists in Belgrade. After gaining a scholarship to the University of Michigan (1986) he spent time with Clare Fischer, under whose influence he renewed his approach to the piano. In the course of his service in the Serbian army (...

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Zulu isithontolo (mouth-resonated musical bow)

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Susana Friedmann

(b Cereté, July 18, 1945). Colombian composer. He completed his undergraduate studies in composition at the National University of Colombia (1970) and was granted a scholarship to study in Paris with Nadia Boulanger, where he twice won the Grand Prix de Composition (...

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Craig H. Russell

(b c1678; d Antequerra, Valle de Oaxaca, Dec 21, 1755). Mexican composer and organist. He probably entered the service of Mexico City Cathedral in about 1690, and quickly established a reputation as a prodigy. His name first appears in a document dated ...

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Hans-Hubert Schönzeler

(b Oppach, April 9, 1850; d Munich, Sept 4, 1903). German conductor and composer. Trained at the teachers’ seminary at Bautzen (where he also received a thorough musical education), Zumpe taught in the local school at Weigsdorf in 1870–71, then went as a teacher to Leipzig, where he furthered his musical studies with Tottmann. He turned to music completely when Wagner called him to Bayreuth in ...

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Margaret Cranmer

(b Fürth, nr Nuremburg, June 14, 1726; bur. London, Dec 5, 1790). English harpsichord and piano maker of German origin. He may have worked for the Silbermanns and was the most famous of the German keyboard instrument makers known as the ‘12 Apostles’, who emigrated to London about the time of the Seven Years War. Zumpe worked briefly for Burkat Shudi, and married Elizabeth Beeston on ...

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Zumpe-style single action from a 1775 square piano inscribed as by Jacob and Abraham Kirkman

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(b Sachsenflur, nr Mergentheim, Jan 10, 1760; d Stuttgart, Jan 27, 1802). German composer and conductor. His father was in military service before becoming a personal servant of Duke Carl Eugen of Württemberg. After the early death of his mother, Zumsteeg received a good general education at the Carlsschule in Stuttgart, the military academy founded by the duke, where he became friendly with Schiller and the sculptor Johann Heinrich Dannecker (who made a bust of him). Zumsteeg was originally intended for a career as a sculptor, but his musical talent showed itself early. He studied the cello with the chamber virtuoso Eberhard Malterre and from ...

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Marcia J. Citron

(b Stuttgart, Dec 9, 1796; d Stuttgart, Aug 1, 1857). German composer, pianist, singer and teacher . The youngest of seven children born to the composer Johann Rudolf Zumsteeg, she studied the piano with Schlick and theory with Wilhelm Sutor. Gifted with a fine alto voice, she was soon singing and performing on the piano (e.g. at the Stuttgart Museumskonzerte). As an adult Zumsteeg mixed with leading musicians and poets. The literary ties reflected her interest in the lied, which formed the basis of her creative reputation. She also wrote several piano works, such as the early ...

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Sarah L. Martin

(b Hochdorf, Germany, Dec 10, 1815; d Cannstadt, Germany, July 1882). German organist and composer, active in the United States. Zundel received his first music education at the Royal Academy of Esslingen, Württemberg (1829–31). In 1833 he taught music at a seminary in Esslingen, at the same time studying violin with Molique, but gave up that instrument for the organ. In ...

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A Reed , as in Zungenpfeife (reedpipe), and Zungenstimmen or Zungenwerk (reed stop or Reed-work ).

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Tongue, as in Zungenstoss or Zungenschlag; that is, an attack or stroke of the tongue (for further information see Tonguing).

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John Tyrrell

(b Prague, June 21, 1840; d Prague, April 22, 1894). Czech translator and librettist. He made a living for himself through journalism and translating plays (over a hundred), operas and operettas (about 60). He also wrote original plays himself and some opera librettos, mostly adaptations of foreign sources. His best-known libretto, ...