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Shiba  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Panpipe of the Luba/Luluwa people in the Shaba region, Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has two or three bamboo tubes. Four shiba panpipes are used, in conjunction with other instruments, for dance music. Siba or shiba is also a generic name among the Sampwe for panpipes with four bamboo tubes, and with four, five, seven, or eight bamboo tubes among the Luba....

Article

Christian Poché

Bowl or box lyre with five strings, found in Egypt (from the Suez area to Sinai), Saudi Arabia (the Red Sea coast) and South Yemen (where it has six strings). This instrument is smaller than the ṭanbūra. In South Yemen the simsimiyya lyre has a circular soundbox, with two arms, less widely spread than in the ...

Article

Sipi  

Lamellaphone of the Komo people in the Kivu region, Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has wooden tongues affixed to a wooden soundtable over a resonator of tortoise shell, wood, or gourd (see Ekembi ).

LaurentyS, 193, 196

J.-S. Laurenty: L’Organologie du Zaïre, 2 (Tervuren, 1995)...

Article

Ṭabl  

Michael Pirker

Arabic generic term for drums. It is particularly applied to double-headed cylindrical drums in the Arab Middle East, including North Africa (especially Egypt, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco and the Sudan). It may occur in combination with other words, indicating drums of the same type with regional differences of size or drums used in different regional combinations of instruments. The term ...

Article

Tabshi  

K.A. Gourlay

Small snared kettledrum used by the Hausa and other peoples of northern and central Nigeria. The wooden body is 27 cm tall and 22 cm in diameter. It has a goatskin or duiker-skin head with a patch of tuning-paste. The head is lapped to a leather-bound rope ring and V-laced, with leather thongs and a horizontal tuning brace, to an iron ring at the base of the body. A hole in the side of the body is used to pour in a libation of oil and spices. In Hausa music the ...

Article

Tama  

K.A. Gourlay, Lucy Durán and Rainer Polak

Variable-tension hourglass drum of the Wolof and Mande-speaking peoples (Khasonka, Soninke, Maninka, Bamana, Dyula) and their neighbours in Senegal, the Gambia, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea, Mali, Burkina Faso, and Ivory Coast. The tama is struck with one curved drumstick with a flattened end, and by one hand. The two heads are lapped onto rings at the ends of the wooden body and joined by numerous cords so that, when the drum is placed under the player’s arm, pressure on the cords can vary the pitch. Most modern instruments are relatively small (25 to 30 cm tall, 10 to 15 cm in diameter); in Mande languages, these are known as ...

Article

Tambari  

Anthony King, K.A. Gourlay and Roger Blench

A common name for the Kettledrum used in sets as part of the regalia of many traditional savanna states of West Africa. Its association with royalty in, for instance, the Hausa states of Nigeria is chronicled in the 17th century, and in its form, usage and name the ...

Article

Tarija  

Christian Poché

Single-headed goblet drum of Morocco. It is made of glazed pottery, often geometrically decorated. It ranges in height from 12 to 80 cm, and the head, commonly of goatskin, is glued on and can have an internal snare. It is played by Berber men or women during festivities and processions (in Marrakesh), and by children as a toy. Long instruments are called ...

Article

Ankle bells used by bowl-lyre players of the Marach people of Kenya.

Article

Towa  

Konin Aka

Large gourd vessel rattle of the Baule people of the Ivory Coast. It has an external net strung with cowrie shells or pearls and is used mainly on ceremonial occasions to mark the appearance of masked dancers. It especially evokes the most powerful divinities who protect Baule villages. It also accompanies war songs....

Article

Tsambi  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Lamellaphone of the Mayombe region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Three types have been reported: a flat-board type with 10 metal tongues; a raft-body type with 11 (apparently) wooden or bamboo tongues; and a box-resonated type with 10 metal tongues.

J.S. Laurenty: Les sanza du Congo...

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Drum of the Bena Kalundwe, Luba, and Sanga peoples of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has a cylindrical, footed body 1.2 to 1.5 metres long, with a single head nailed on. Among the Luba it is beaten for the enthroning of a chief, or in times of war....

Article

Tsimbi  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Lamellaphone of the Loango region of the western Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has six or seven metal tongues and a resonator made of a hollowed piece of wood. It is open on the end nearer the player and beak-shaped at the opposite, closed end. The Sundi call it ...

Article

Tsinda  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Drum of the Mbole, Kutu, and Saka peoples of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The single head is nailed to the footed body, which is decorated with geometrical incisions. It resembles the Nkundo bondundu.

O. Boone: Les tambours du Congo belge et du Ruanda-Urundi...

Article

Metal leg bells of the Wanga people of Northern Nyanza district, Kenya.

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Double-headed drum of the Yeke, Luba, and Lomotwa peoples in the Shaba region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The body is made of a palm tree log, with both ends hollowed but left solid in the centre. The heads are nailed on. Frequently it is decorated with white and red geometrical patterns. It is suspended from the neck of the player and used to accompany songs of praise to the chief....

Article

Small spherical metal pellet bell of European make used by the Tshokwe people of the Lóvua/Lunda district, Angola. Mounted on strips of antelope skin, the bells are attached to the legs of dancers or may be shaken by hand to accompany singing.

Article

Uindja  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Rattle of the Nzakara people of the Central African Republic and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is made of dried fruit shells strung together, and is worn on the arms and legs of dancers.

Article

Clapper bell of the Baganda people of Uganda. It is made from a narrow rectangular strip of iron, folded into the shape of an inverted U, with the clapper suspended inside it.

Article

Undaji  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Voice modifier of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is made of reed or a hollow stem of the papaya tree. One end is covered with a thin skin or spider web that vibrates and alters the vocal timbre when the user sings into the other, open end. Although uncommon, it is used throughout the DRC and called by various names including ...