5,941-5,960 of 57,944 results

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Bissex  

Experimental lute-guitar with 12 strings, invented by Van Heck of Paris and built there by J.-H. Naderman in 1770 and later; J.-F. Thiphanon also built it. Five strings (tuned e–b–g–d–a) pass over the fingerboard, which has 20 frets; the other seven strings (tuned ...

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Jonathan Santa Maria Bouquet

(b Soresina, Italy, April 2, 1929). Italian violin maker. Bissolotti was trained initially as a woodcarver and engraver in Castelleone, and subsequently learned marquetry and cabinetmaking in Cantù. He attended the Scuola Internazionale di Liuteria di Cremona (S.I.L.C.) from 1957 to 1961 and studied with Pietro Sgarabotto, Giuseppe Ornati, Luigi Galimberti, and Simone Fernando Sacconi. Shortly after graduating Bissolotti opened his own workshop in Cremona, constructing mainly violins and occasionally other string instruments including lutes and guitars. Sacconi shared Bissolotti’s workshop most summers from ...

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Frank Dobbins

(fl Paris, 1561–8). French composer and editor. He worked as a corrector and transcriber for the press of Nicolas Du Chemin between 1561 and 1568 and was commissioned to prepare a series of selections from existing anthologies: four volumes duly appeared in 1561...

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Belgian big band. It was established in Brussels in 1920 by the drummer René Vinche and his brother after they had heard Louis Mitchell’s Jazz Kings. The orchestra was originally an amateur group and, although it very quickly became professional, it recorded only two tracks, the pairing ...

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Peter Sensier and Graham Wade

(b Rosario, Argentina, July 20, 1943). Argentine guitarist. He began to play the guitar at the age of five, and studied in Santa Fé with Graciela Pomponio and Jorge Martínez Zarate; at 15 he made his début in Rosario. He then built a national reputation, becoming a professor at the Instituto Superior de Música de la Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santa Fé, in ...

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J. Michele Edwards

(b New London, CT, Jan 15, 1908; d New London, CT, April 15, 2007). American composer, organist and choral director. After graduation from Connecticut College for Women (BA 1928), she studied theory and organ at the Guilmant Organ School (1930), attended Columbia University (MA ...

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Leonidas Economou

(b Athens, Greece, Dec 11, 1922; d Athens, April 7, 2005). Greek singer and composer. He began his career as a laïko composer and bouzouki soloist and sang only occasionally. He made his first great hit as a singer in 1956, with a song by Manos Hadjidakis, but he became widely known in the early 1960s when Mikis Theodorakis chose him as the main interpreter of some of his most important works. His career peaked between 1960 and 1974. He became the most important male voice of the entechno laïko song, performing a great number of songs of all the composers of this genre. He also recorded new influential versions of classic rebetika and many laïko and elafrolaïko hits (often his own compositions). His timid acceptance of the Junta regime blemished his image and, due also to the deterioration of his voice, his career declined and he made only a few recordings after ...

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Bitogu  

The syllabic names given to the first three notes of the C major scale in the ‘Tonwort’ system devised by Carl Eitz and employed as a popular name for the system itself. See Eitz method.

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Bitola  

Dimitrije Bužarovski

City in the southwestern part of the Republic of Macedonia. Its central position in the Pelagonia valley contributed to the city’s importance as a commercial, administrative, military, and cultural center. The Ancient city Heraclea Lyncestis was founded by Phillip the II of Macedon, and after the Roman conquest of Macedonia, Septina Aurelia Heraclea was an important post on a Via Egnatia route. The Greek name Monastíri (Albanian Manastiri; Turkish Manastır) points to the numerous churches (and monasteries) in the city and its vicinity during the Middle Ages....

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Arnold Whittall

The simultaneous, superimposed presence of two distinct tonalities. In practice the term is applied not only to compositions which employ two unambiguously diatonic keys, but also to those which superimpose contrasted modal segments, or two conventionally unrelated triads without other elements of diatonic progression. Techniques loosely categorized as bitonal are often passing effects within a harmonic language that is subtly balanced between traditional hierarchies and new symmetries....

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Renate Federhofer-Königs

(b Schwedt an der Oder, Feb 27, 1813; d Berlin, Sept 12, 1885). German musicologist. His name has sometimes been incorrectly given as Heinrich. After studying at the universities of Berlin and Bonn he entered the Prussian civil service in which he held several important posts until ...

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John Walter Hill

(b Genoa, 1655/6; d Florence, Feb 2, 1743). Italian violinist and composer. He entered the service of the Grand Duke Cosimo III of Tuscany as a violinist on 1 March 1685. His duties during his first years in Florence included performing in the numerous operas and private concerts arranged by Prince Ferdinando de’ Medici. From ...

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(fl 1680). Austro-Bohemian lutenist and composer. The few lines devoted to him in Baron's Untersuchung (1727) are misleading as regards his publications. His Pieces de lut (1682), engraved by G. de Groos, then residing in Prague, and with a title-page by Karel Skreta, contains 53 technically demanding pieces for 11-course lute. The collection is dedicated to Johann Peter Pedroni, a wealthy citizen and tradesman in Prague. The pieces are grouped into ten suites, generally following the allemande–courante–sarabande–gigue pattern, each (except the second) preceded by a ...

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Erik Levi

(b Vienna, April 9, 1874; d Vienna, 9/Jan 10, 1939). Austrian composer. He was essentially self-taught as a musician, but received some formal instruction from the Bruckner disciple Josef Labor. He composed mainly in his spare time while pursuing a career as a lawyer and judge in Wolkersdorf (from ...

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(b Fabriano, Aug 20, 1756; d Fabriano, May 18, 1829). Italian composer. He studied music in Fabriano, first under his father, Mario Gaetano Bittoni (c 1723–1798), maestro di cappella from 1743 at the cathedral, and later under a teacher named Lombardi. In ...

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Pavla Jonssonová

(b 22 July 1958, Bruntál in Czechoslovakia). Czech vocalist, violinist, composer, and actress..Bittová grew up in a musical family and with sisters Ida and Regina often accompanied her father, the composer and multi-instrumentalist Koloman Bitto. She gave up playing violin at the age of fourteen and so her mother, a choir singer and teacher, enrolled her to study acting at Brno Conservatory. In 1978, Bittová became a member of the avant garde theatre Husa na provázku (Goose on a String), starring as Eržika in the popular musical Balada pro banditu (Ballad for a Bandit). She also began her film acting career at this time. She quit her theatre career in 1982 to fulfill her father’s wishes and restarted her study of the violin under Rudolf Šťastný of the Moravian String Quartet. Enabled by her theatrical professionalism, improvisational skills, command of pitch, and purity of tone, Bittová developed a unique performance style consisting of combining the voice and the violin. This avant garde interplay of violin and extended vocalization techniques (ranging from primordial and nature-inspired clicking, screeching and ululating to folkloristic tunes) shocked her audiences. In ...

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(d 1141). French ecclesiastic. He was a celebrated scholar who headed the cathedral school at Reims from about 1114 to 1136, when he became Archbishop of Bourges. One polyphonic piece in the Codex Calixtinus ( E-SC ), Ad superni regis decus, is attributed to him. Since an earlier version of this piece appears (late 11th century) in the ‘Saint-Martial’ repertory as ...

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Mariangela Donà

(b ?Milan, c1580; d Milan, Nov 24, 1653). Italian composer and organist. He was organist of at least two churches in Milan, first of S Maria della Passione, afterwards (certainly in 1612) of S Ambrogio. On 30 March 1623 he was appointed organist at the second organ of Milan Cathedral, succeeding Cesare Borgo, and he held this post until his death. In ...

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Raymond J. Gariglio and Barry Kernfeld

(b New London, CT, Nov 25, 1915; d Woodland Hills, CA, Jan 5, 1996). American clarinetist. He grew up in a musical family and played the violin at the age of ten and alto saxophone and clarinet when he was 16. After performing with lesser-known bands in Connecticut he moved to New York in the early 1930s. Routinely doubling on alto saxophone, he worked with the Hudson–de Lange orchestra (...