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Josiane Bran-Ricci and Hervé Lacombe

(b Naples, Sept 15, 1808; d Paris, March 19, 1866). French composer, curator and teacher. His paternal grandfather was a wind instrument maker at Lyons and his father a professional horn player who played principal horn at the Teatro S Carlo, Naples, and led the military band for Murat (King of Naples during the First Empire) in the early 19th century. As a result of political and military events at the end of the Empire, the Clapisson family returned to France and settled in about ...

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(b Copenhagen, May 1, 1855; d Frederiksberg, Feb 22, 1931). Danish textile manufacturer, diplomat, philanthropist, and instrument collector. He was the son of a theatre prop manager. In 1884, after some years as a school teacher and inspector, he moved to Malmö, where he opened a textile factory. While living in Sweden he helped establish the Swedish section of the International Musicological Society which he led until ...

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Richard Will

(b New York, Aug 2, 1932). American folk musician, folklorist, filmmaker, and photographer. He studied painting and photography at the Yale School of Fine Arts (BFA 1955, MFA 1957), where his teachers included Joseph Albers and Herbert Matter. In 1958 he formed the New Lost City Ramblers with ...

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Sally K. Sommers Smith Wells

(b New York, NY, Dec 13, 1936). American Folklorist and musicologist. Trained as a physical chemist, he is one of the foremost scholars of American traditional-music history, practice, and recording. In addition to holding faculty positions in chemistry at two undergraduate institutions in Portland, Oregon, he has taught undergraduate courses in folk song, bluegrass, country, and Jewish music in Portland and at UCLA. Cohen is perhaps best known for his long association with the John Edwards Memorial Foundation (now John Edwards Memorial Forum; JEMF). He served as the editor or co-editor of the ...

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José López-Calo

(b Córdoba, 1488; d Seville, Sept 12, 1539). Spanish bibliophile and music collector. The illegitimate son of Christopher Columbus, he received a thorough education at the court of the Catholic Monarchs. From his earliest years he had a great passion for travel and accompanied his father on a journey to America. Later he made several extensive journeys through Europe, at first with Charles V and later on his own account. He took advantage of his journeys to acquire the best books he could find on many subjects, including music. He kept an exact account of all his acquisitions, with details of the most important ones; in each volume he noted the place and date of purchase and the price. He also compiled careful lists of his library. By the end of his life he had an extremely important library of more than 15,000 items, including numerous manuscripts; on his death he left the whole collection to Seville Cathedral. Regrettably, nearly three-quarters of the books have been lost; only some 4000 volumes remain. Among them, nevertheless, there are some very valuable items, ranging from medieval manuscripts to unique prints of Petrucci and theoretical works. His catalogues also largely survive and provide details of early printed music which has since been lost. In ...

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Owain Edwards

(bap. London, July 18, 1680; d London, March 7, 1748). English violinist, composer and collector. His earliest compositions were songs and incidental music for the Lincoln’s Inn Fields Theatre, where he also played. In 1705 he was engaged to play in the orchestra at the new Queen’s Theatre in the Haymarket, where the following year the semi-opera ...

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Charles Beare and Carlo Chiesa

(b Casale Monferrato, March 14, 1755; d Salabue, Dec 15, 1840). Italian collector of violins. He was of noble birth and endowed with both a natural curiosity about violins and the means to satisfy it. His first great opportunity came in 1775–6 when he acquired ten Stradivari violins, together with tools, patterns and all that remained of Stradivari's violin-making equipment (now owned by the city of Cremona) from the master's son Paolo. For the next 50 years, with the assistance of the Mantegazza family, Cozio avidly traced and where possible purchased fine Italian violins of the Cremonese school, scrupulously noting down their details in his ...

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Gordon E. Smith

(b Dartmouth, NS, Sept 5, 1899; d Halifax, NS, Dec 12, 1989). Canadian folksong collector. She studied music for a short period at McGill University and was later a social worker and teacher in Guadalajara, Mexico. Inspired by her fellow Nova Scotian, W.R. Mackenzie, she began collecting maritime traditional folksongs in ...

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Charles Haywood and Anne Dhu McLucas

(b New York, NY, April 26, 1875; d Paris, France, Oct 23, 1921). American Musician, transcriber, folksong collector, and folklorist. She studied music at the National Conservatory and the Paris Conservatoire. After visiting the Chicago World’s Fair and other expositions, she became intrigued with Native American music and abandoned plans for a career as a concert pianist in order to work among American Indians. She began in ...

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Andrew D. McCredie and Samantha Owens

(b Sydney, Australia, April 16, 1887; d Brisbane, Australia, July 31, 1959). Australian conductor, composer, and music collector. He studied with Arthur Mason and Gordon Lavers in Sydney. In 1912 he was appointed organist and choir director at Christ Church Anglican Cathedral and conductor of the choral society in Grafton, New South Wales. After war service he went to London for further study with Frederick Bridge, R.R. Terry, and Charles W. Pearce. He returned to Australia in ...

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Geoffrey Norris

(fl c1760–90). Russian folksong collector. All that is known of him is that his name, perhaps a pseudonym, is associated with one of the most valuable 18th-century folklore collections. There is evidence that he began fieldwork in one of the south-western regions of Siberia during the 1760s, for in ...

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Gerard Béhague

(b Santiago, May 16, 1932). Chilean ethnomusicologist and folklorist. At the University of Chile he studied philosophy, specializing in Romance languages and Spanish education (1958–65); he also studied ethnomusicology and folklore privately with Carlos Lavín. He has held positions as professor of folklore at the Catholic University (...

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(b Havana, Cuba, June 20, 1930). Cuban musicologist, historical essayist, recorded-sound collector, and lawyer; immigrated to Puerto Rico in 1960. Díaz Ayala studied journalism and law at the Universidad de La Habana, and began his musical career as a radio host on a jazz program in Havana. Although he is not a formally trained musicologist, his impressive archival work and research in the field of recorded folk music established him as an authority on Cuban musical culture....

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Lester Levy

(b nr Warsaw, Poland, Dec 25, 1899; d Atlantic City, NJ, Jan 27, 1977). American collector of and dealer in sheet music, born in Poland. He immigrated to the USA in 1906. For some 40 years until his retirement in 1965 he worked as a waiter in Philadelphia. While operating a small bookshop, from ...

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(b Rinteln an der Weser, Oct 7, 1801; d Nuremberg, May 25, 1880). German folksong collector. After abandoning his law studies at the University of Marburg (1820–25), he made the acquaintance of Spohr in Kassel. This, together with his interest in published folksong collections, inspired him to devote himself to poetry and music and especially to collecting folksongs. He took theory lessons with Moritz Hauptmann in Leipzig and also studied the music of the 15th and 16th centuries. From ...

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Maria Domokos

(b Csíkvárdotfalva, June 28, 1901; d Budapest, Feb 18, 1992). Hungarian musicologist and folklorist. After taking a diploma in 1919 as a schoolmaster and music teacher in Csíksomlyó (now Şumuleu), he studied music and sciences at the Budapest Teachers' Training College (graduated 1926...

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Jonas Westover

(b Brookline, MA, c1875; d Boston, MA, c1959). American collector, arranger, and civil engineer. He is responsible for one of the largest collections of sheet music in America. While growing up in Brookline he learned to play piano and organ under ...

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Bruce Alan Brown

(b Genoa, April 27, 1717; d Padua, Oct 15, 1794). Italian diplomat, theatre director, librettist and art collector, and one of the principal catalysts of reform in 18th-century opera and ballet. The francophilia that coloured nearly all Durazzo's theatrical endeavours was largely the result of his birth into a noble Genoese family (of Albanian origin) with a long history of commercial and political dealings with France. The Durazzos (who produced several doges, including Giacomo's older brother Marcello) were active in Genoa's theatrical life, notably as proprietors of the Teatro del Falcone. Following his inscription into the nobility in ...

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(b St Petersburg, 8/Jan 20, 1857; d St Petersburg, 16/Sept 28, 1891). Russian conductor and folksong collector, son of Otto Johann Anton Dütsch. He studied at the St Petersburg Conservatory (1866–75). After Borodin’s death he assisted with the preparation for publication of the vocal score of ...

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Folke Bohlin

(b Odensvi, Västmanland, Sept 1, 1811; d Södertälje, July 28, 1877). Swedish folk music collector and antiquarian. He studied law at Uppsala University (1831–4) and was then engaged in official duties until 1842. He was a good amateur singer but had no professional training in music. While still a student he made rune stones and the study of folk traditions his main interest in life. In spite of poor health, he travelled throughout Sweden in pursuit of this interest until a few years before his death, working particularly in the province of Dalarna. His work was partly supported by the Vitterhetsakademien and by the State. Most of his findings were published in Dybeck’s journal ...