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Article

Anna Pennington

(b United States). American oboist, English horn player, and pedagogue. Carolyn Hove attended the Oberlin College Conservatory of Music and upon graduation moved to Chicago where she maintained an active performance schedule. While in Illinois she taught at Northern Illinois University and Elmhurst College. In 1986 she became English horn player with the San Antonio Symphony, and two years later secured the same post with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, a position she held until 2011. During the past quarter century Hove has been featured as a soloist with the Los Angeles Philharmonic numerous times and also has been involved in the creation and premiere of many new works for her instrument. Composers that have written pieces for her include Esa-Pekka Salonen and William Kraft. She also recorded two solo CDs for the Crystal Records label, 20th Century Music for English Horn and Oboe in 1996 and Ascending to Superlatives...

Article

Heidi Lucas

(b White Plains, NY, May 10, 1950). American horn performer. Hustis attended the Curtis Institute of Music (BM 1972) where he studied with mason Jones . Since 1976 he has performed as principal horn in the Dallas Symphony. He also served for four years as principal horn in the Hamilton Philharmonic, Ontario, Canada. In addition to frequent work as a commercial recording artist for radio, film, and television, he has performed and recorded with many notable ensembles, including the Dallas Symphony, the Philadelphia Orchestra, and Summit Brass. His other recording projects include Joseph Schwantner’s Beyond Autumn, commissioned by the International Horn Society, and works by composers such as Eric Ewazen, Simon Sargon, Augusta Read Thomas, and Lee Holdridge. In the mid-1990s he co-founded the company TrumCor to manufacture mutes for brass instruments. In 1997 Hustis introduced a Chamber Music series for Music in the Mountains, a festival in Durango, Colorado, and in ...

Article

Richard H. Perry

(Maurice )

(b Philadelphia, PA, June 11, 1915; d Chicago, IL, Oct 7, 1998). American tuba player and educator. He entered the Curtis Institute in 1930 and studied with Philip Donatelli of the Philadelphia Orchestra. After graduating in 1936, he was a member of the Indianapolis SO (1937–9), the Pittsburgh SO (1939–44), and the Chicago SO (1944–88). He also performed with the All-American Youth Orchestra under Leopold Stokowski in 1941 and recorded with the Philadelphia Orchestra in 1949. With colleagues from the Chicago SO he performed in the Chicago Symphony Brass Quintet. He recorded numerous times with the Chicago SO, but only once as a soloist: Ralph Vaughan Williams’s Tuba Concerto (1977).

Jacobs is widely regarded as one of the most influential brass pedagogues of the 20th century. Although largely self-taught, he was considered by many to be the foremost expert on the study of breathing as it applies to wind instruments. Widely sought after as a teacher by tuba players and other brass performers, Jacobs also developed a reputation as a pedagogue among woodwind players. In addition to teaching in his private studio, he was on the faculty of Northwestern University. His former students have occupied orchestral and teaching positions throughout the United States....

Article

Catherine Wojtanowski

[Jim] (Mallea)

(b Nampa, ID, Dec 30, 1920; d Boise, ID, Dec 2, 2004). American accordionist. His parents migrated to the United States from the Basque region of Spain. He grew up listening to the music of guitars and button accordions played by travelers at his parent’s boarding house. When he was 12 years old, Jausoro purchased his first accordion and began taking lessons. By age 15 he had become skilled enough to win an amateur contest and the opportunity to play on a national radio program in Portland, Oregon. In 1957 he started the Jim Jausoro Band, which played Basque and modern dance music until 2000. Three years later he began to perform music with the Oinkari Basque Dancers, a group which has continued to showcase Basque dance today. In addition to four decades working for the Union Pacific Railroad, he performed at countless dance rehearsals, community dances, weddings, cultural events, state festivals, and world’s fairs. He taught budding accordionists through apprentice programs and at music camps. He became known in Boise as an accomplished Basque accordionist as well as a culture bearer for Basque tradition. The many honors he received include the Idaho Governor’s Award in the Arts for Lifetime Achievement (...

Article

Cathy Ragland

[Leonardo ]

(b San Antonio, TX, March 11, 1939). American accordionist and songwriter. He inherited his nickname Flaco (“skinny”) from his accordionist father, santiago Jiménez . Like many Texas-Mexican musicians of his generation, he was born into a musical family—his grandfather Patricio played the accordion, as does his younger brother Santiago Jr.—and has played the three-row, diatonic Hohner button accordion; his father played the two-row model. He began performing in his father’s conjunto band at the age of seven, accompanying him on the bajo sexto. By age 16 he was playing accordion and had his own conjunto band, Los Caporales. This was during the early rock-and-roll years when such artists as Elvis Presley and Buddy Holly made a lasting impression on him. In 1973 he recorded with Doug Sahm, a founding member of 1960s San Antonio’s rock pioneers Sir Douglas Quintet. Jiménez developed a syncopated and lively modern accordion sound by ornamenting and extending simple folk melodies and using fermatas. He has continued to mine blues, country, R&B, and pop music to update his style and as a result has collaborated with Bob Dylan, Ry Cooder, Dr. John, and Los Super Seven, among others. He has received an NEA National Heritage Fellowship and multiple Grammy Awards....

Article

Cathy Ragland

(b San Antonio, TX, April 25, 1913; d San Antonio, Dec 18, 1984). American accordionist, songwriter, and composer, father of the accordionists Flaco Jiménez and Santiago Jiménez Jr. He is known as a pioneering accordionist and composer of many classic polkas. With encouragement from his accordion-playing father Patricio Jiménez, he began playing at age eight. Although he released his first recording, “Dices pescao” (Decca), in 1936, he was best known for weekly live performances on a Spanish-language radio program, La hora anáuhuac, which aired in the 1940s on San Antonio’s KCOR. He recorded two popular polkas, “Viva Seguin” and “La piedrera,” in 1942 for the Mexican Victor label, the latter written while he worked in a quarry. They were his most popular and have been widely performed and recorded by musicians since. Compared with that of Narciso Martínez, his main rival, Jiménez’s playing style was smoother with less syncopation and fewer 16th notes; he never graduated to the three-row button accordion. However, his precision and rich musicality has remained unmatched. Like Martínez, Jiménez could not make a living from music, and in the 1960s he moved to Dallas and worked as a janitor. He returned to San Antonio in ...

Article

Stephen Montague

revised by Katie Buehner

(Carl )

(b Batavia, NY, Jan 30, 1940). American composer and flutist. He studied composition with Walter F. Anderson, donald Keats , and David M Epstein at Antioch College (BA 1962) and with leon Kirchner and billy jim Layton at Harvard University (MA 1964), before traveling to Paris for studies with Emile Boulanger (1964–5). He then moved to Cologne, where he studied (1965–6) and taught at the Rheinische Musikschule in the Cologne Courses for New Music (1966–7). He collaborated with Stockhausen (on Hymnen) and others in the electronic studio of West German Radio (1966–7) and was a member of the Stockhausen ensemble that for six months gave performances of that composer’s music at the Osaka World’s Fair (1970). With Rolf Gehlhaar and Johannes Fritsch, he cofounded Feedback Studio, a music publishing house and concert space near Cologne (...

Article

Richard H. Perry

(Lewis )

(b Montgomery, AL, Aug 7, 1941). American jazz tuba player, baritone saxophonist, and bandleader. Largely self-taught, he first learned baritone saxophone, then tuba. In 1963 he moved to New York, where he quickly established himself as a leading jazz tuba player and performed with Charles Mingus, Archie Shepp, and, notably, Gil Evans. He played with Evans’s orchestra from 1966 until the leader’s death in 1988. He also worked with Charlie Haden, Jack DeJohnette, Chet Baker, and McCoy Tyner and spent several years with the Norddeutscher Rundfunk orchestra. From 1975 to 1980 he was a member of the house band for “Saturday Night Live,” serving as bandleader from 1979 to 1980.

Although Johnson has been recognized for his work on baritone saxophone, he is best known for his tuba playing and for his work with tuba ensembles. In 1968 he formed the first jazz tuba ensemble, Substructure. Although this group never recorded, Johnson subsequently formed Gravity, an ensemble with six tubas, in the 1970s; it released ...

Article

Richard H. Perry

[John Thomas ]

(b Los Angeles, CA, Jan 7, 1935; d Los Angeles, CA, Oct 16, 2006). American tuba player and educator. He attended the University of Southern California (BM 1956), where he studied with Robert Marsteller. In 1958 he began a recording career that eventually included more than 2000 film soundtracks, notably those for The Godfather, Jaws, Titanic, The Matrix, and the Indiana Jones and Star Trek movies, and hundreds of television shows. During his lifetime Johnson was thought to be the most heard tuba player in the United States. He received the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences Most Valuable Player award for tuba for six years in a row from 1974 to 1980; the following year he was designated Emeritus Most Valuable Tuba Player, making him ineligible to win the award again. Johnson also was a member of the Glendale SO and the Los Angeles Tuba Quartet, and he appeared with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Pasadena Symphony, and the LA Pops Orchestra....

Article

Patrick Richards

(b Los Angeles, CA, 1948). American horn player. He moved from Los Angeles to New York, where he attended the Juilliard School (BM 1971, MM 1972). He was a founding member of the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, with which he had made more than two dozen recordings by the early 2010s, at which time he was an emeritus member. In 1994 he organized the wind quintet Windscape. Other chamber groups with which Jolley has worked include the Guarneri Quartet, the Areopagitica Brass Trio, the American String Quartet, and the Beaux Arts Trio. Jolley’s solo recordings include Mozart: Horn Concertos (Arabesque, 2004); Strauss: Horn Concertos nos. 1 & 2 (Arabesque, 2006); Villanelle: French Masterworks for Horn (Arabesque, 2006); Music for Horn (Arabesque, 2008) featuring the work of Alec Wilder; and Adagio & Allegro: German Romantic Works for Horn (Arabesque, 2008). Recognition for Jolley’s performing skills include the Concert Artists Guild award and the Top Prize at the Heldenleben International Horn Competition. Several composers have written works specifically for him, including Ellen Taaffe Zwilich (Concerto for Horn and String Orchestra), John Harbison (...

Article

Jonas Westover

[Doli; Doll; Hutchinson, Dolly; Armenra, Dolly; Armena, Doli]

(b Chicago, IL, c1906; d ?Philadelphia, PA). American trumpeter and cornetist. Little is known about certain details of her life, except that she was the daughter of the female trumpeter Diyah [Diyer] Jones. She began her career as a member of the family band, which recruited Josephine Baker to dance with them around 1919. She was one of the first female jazz trumpeters to be heard on record. She recorded “When”/“That Creole Band” (1926, OK) as a soloist and a member of Al Wynn’s Creole Jazz Band; it may have been her only release. She spent much of her life in Chicago, where she played with Ma Rainey’s group in the mid-1920s. After marrying Jimmy Hutchinson she began to use his surname; later she returned to “Dolly Jones” and also used the surname Armenra, sometimes with variant spellings. By the middle of the next decade, she was performing regularly with Lil Armstrong’s band. She made a notable appearance in Oscar Micheaux’s all-black short film, ...

Article

Martha Woodward

(b Hamilton, NY, June 16, 1919; d Wynnewood, PA, Feb 19, 2009). American horn player. He attended the Curtis Institute (1936–8), where he was a pupil of marcel Tabuteau and fritz Reiner , and joined the Philadelphia Orchestra at Eugene Ormandy’s invitation in 1938. He was its principal horn from 1940 until he retired in 1978. He also worked as its personnel manager (1963–86) and conductor of its in-school concerts. Jones appeared as a soloist and made recordings with the orchestra, as well as with the Philadelphia Woodwind Quintet and the Philadelphia Brass Ensemble. His publications include editions of solos and orchestral studies for horn. In 1946 he was appointed to the faculty of the Curtis Institute, where he served as professor of horn for 49 years. Jones’s playing is characterized by great warmth and naturalness and by a rare cantabile quality. A total control of the dynamic possibilities of his instrument enabled him to achieve a particularly expressive sound....

Article

Ruth Rosenberg

[Cliff] (Laconia)

(b Chicago, IL, Sept 2, 1931; d New York, NY, March 27, 1993). American tenor saxophonist and bandleader. He was one of several notable jazz musicians to come out of DuSable High School on Chicago’s South Side, where his contemporaries included the tenor saxophonists Johnny Griffin and John Gilmore and the bass player Richard Davis. During his early years in Chicago he played with Max Roach and Sonny Stitt and a variety of rhythm-and-blues bands. In 1957 he moved to New York and recorded his first album, Blowing in from Chicago (BN) with the hard-bop pioneers Horace Silver on piano and Art Blakey on drums. In the years that followed Jordan performed and recorded prolifically, appearing with groups led by Silver and J.J. Johnson, as a sideman on recordings by Lee Morgan, among others, and co-leading a group with Kenny Dorham. In 1964 he toured Europe with the Charles Mingus Sextet playing alongside Eric Dolphy....

Article

John-Carlos Perea

(b Tama, IA, May 13, 1933; d Ames, IA, Aug 16, 2006). Native American (Meskwaki) singer, drummer, and flute player. Kapayou was born on the Meskwaki Indian Settlement in Tama, Iowa, where his mother Lucille, a flute player, taught him sacred and secular repertoires of Meskwaki music. While serving in the Army and working in construction, Kapayou retained his commitment to these traditions. He received a National Heritage Fellowship from the NEA in ...

Article

Rich Kienzle

[Kuczynski, Julius Frank Anthony ]

(b Milwaukee, WI, Feb 18, 1914; d Louisville, KY, March 7, 2000). American country music accordionist, bandleader, songwriter, and vocalist. His musical career was inspired by his father, John, a Polish American who led a local polka band. At 15, he began learning accordion and, in 1930, met popular bandleader Wayne King who suggested the youth take the surname “King” in the interest of simplicity. His first band, the King’s Jesters, played both country music and polkas. In 1934, the group filled in for Gene Autry’s band when Autry, then a star of WLS’s National Barn Dance, toured Wisconsin. King joined Autry (who dubbed him “Pee Wee”) in Louisville until the singer left to launch his Hollywood film career. He briefly led a Louisville band known as the Log Cabin Boys, then in 1937 organized the Golden West Cowboys, who joined the Grand Ole Opry with a distinctive, progressive repertoire blending country, pop, polkas, waltzes, and western swing. From ...

Article

J.R. Taylor

[Andrew Dewey ]

(b Newport, KY, May 28, 1898; d New York, NY, Dec 11, 1992). American jazz saxophonist and bandleader. He spent his childhood in Denver, where he studied piano, singing, alto saxophone, and music theory with Paul Whiteman’s father, Wilberforce Whiteman, among others. In 1918 he joined George Morrison’s orchestra as a bass saxophonist and tuba player. Around 1927 he moved to Dallas, where he joined Terrence Holder’s Dark Clouds of Joy orchestra; he assumed its leadership in 1929. In that year he transferred the band to Kansas City, Missouri, where it was known as the Clouds of Joy (among other related titles), rivaled Bennie Moten’s band, and made its first recordings (1929–30). From 1930 he made several nationwide tours, although the band continued to be based primarily in Kansas City. The success of “Until the Real Thing Comes along” (1936, Decca) established the band’s lasting popularity. Until the group disbanded in ...

Article

Michael Baumgartner

[Ronald Theodore ]

(b Columbus, OH, Aug 7, 1935; d Bloomington, IN, Dec 5, 1977). American tenor saxophonist, flutist, and multi-instrumentalist. Blind from the age of two, he took up saxophone and clarinet at the Ohio State School for the Blind in 1948. By 1951 he was performing on tenor saxophone professionally in several local rhythm-and-blues bands. In the second half of the 1950s he worked in Louisville, Nashville, Cincinnati, and Indianapolis, before moving in 1960 to Chicago, where he recorded his first jazz album under his own name, Introducing Roland Kirk (1960, Argo). In 1961 he moved to New York, was part of the Charles Mingus Workshop for three months, and toured Germany in April and California in December. In 1963 he began a residency at Ronnie Scott’s club in London, an engagement which he repeated nearly every year during the 1960s. Until his death, Kirk led his own group, the Vibration Society. With this band he toured North America, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand performing in a multitude of jazz styles. In the early 1970s he was the leader of the Jazz and People’s Movement, an organization for the promotion of black music. In ...

Article

James Wierzbicki

revised by Elizabeth Perten

(b New Brunswick, NJ, Dec 28, 1924; d Great Barrington, MA, Aug 18, 2000). American recorder player. Originally a trombonist, he started to play recorder only at age 21. He studied music at Denver University (1946–8) and musicology with Gustave Reese at New York University (1948–50). In 1952, with noah Greenberg , Krainis founded the New York Pro Musica Antiqua, and he remained with the group until 1959; in the 1960s he organized and toured extensively with the Krainis Baroque Ensemble, the Krainis Baroque Trio, and the Krainis Consort, a recorder ensemble. He gave up touring in 1970, but continued to perform occasionally as a soloist and has made a number of recordings of 17th- and 18th-century music such as The Virtuoso Recorder from Folk Dances to Blues (1965). Krainis sought to promote recorder music composed throughout music history, as evidenced by his recording ...

Article

Paul André Bempéchat

(b Long Beach, NY, Jan 12, 1955). American composer and flutist. She attended Yale College (BA 1975) and Yale School of Music (MM, flute performance, 1976). She studied flute with john Wummer , Herbert Tichman, and Thomas Nyfenger, and composition with jonathan d. Kramer , Robert Moore, and Frank Lewin. Internationally acclaimed, she has composed more than 200 art songs, with settings that seek to retain the integrity of each poem while deploying the fullest resources of the voice. She has won the Boston Art Song Competition (2000) and the Best American Art Song Competition (2004, Men with Small Heads), and has received the Maryland State Arts Council’s Individual Artist Award in Music Composition several times. A mentor to many composers, performers, and scholars, she is regularly invited to conduct masterclasses and workshops throughout North America and across the world.

Her prosodic techniques encompass stream-of-consciousness and French didacticism. The work of multiple poets within single, larger forms evince her sharp attention to the integrity of individual movements and the cohesion of an entire composition. This is demonstrated in, among other works, the oratorio-cantata ...

Article

Bruce Tychinski

(b Ames, IA, Oct 6, 1948). American trombonist. At age 16, Lawrence became the youngest artist to perform with the Detroit Concert Band. In 1973, after studying at the University of Michigan and The Curtis Institute of Music, he was named Principal Trombonist of the Denver Symphony Orchestra. One year after his appointment in Denver, he became Principal Trombonist of the San Francisco Symphony where he remained until his retirement in 2007. During his tenure he appeared on several occasions as a soloist with the orchestra. In the same period he recorded three compact discs of solo trombone repertoire and performed and recorded with a variety of chamber music ensembles including the Empire Brass Quintet, Center City Brass Quintet, Four of a Kind trombone quartet, and Bay Brass. He was a founding member of Summit Brass. In 1996, along with fellow San Francisco Symphony trombonist Paul Welcomer, Lawrence co-founded Marco-Paulo Publishing to promote trombone literature. He has taught at Boston University, Northwestern University, the Tanglewood Institute, the Rafael Mendez Brass Institute, and the Music Academy of the West. He currently serves as professor of trombone and chair of the brass area at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music and also teaches at the Colburn School in Los Angeles....