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Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Yokohama, Japan, Feb 19, 1963). Japanese alto and soprano saxophonist. He took up alto saxophone while in high school and later studied the instrument at Kunitachi College of Music, Tokyo, from which he graduated in 1986. From 1990 to 1995 he lived in the USA, where he joined Marcus Belgrave’s group, studied under Pete Yellin, and performed with Wynton Marsalis, Junior Mance, Jesse Davis, and others. After returning to Japan in ...

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Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Osaka, Japan, Jan 1, 1942). Japanese double bass player and leader. He studied classical double bass from the age of 18 and had lessons with Gary Peacock when he was 23. Later he played in groups led by the pianist Yuji Ohno, Masahiko Sato, Sadao Watanabe, Masabumi Kikuchi, Terumasa Hino, Aki Takase, and Akira Miyazawa, among many others. In ...

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Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, March 21, 1932). Japanese pianist and leader. He studied classical piano privately and led student jazz bands while attending Meiji University. After graduating and then working for a year as a businessman he became a professional musician, and in 1953 he joined Eiji Kitamura’s group and the West Liners. He led a trio from 1964 and a jazz fusion group, Now’in, from 1984. In 1979 he performed with the Inner Galaxy Orchestra at the Montreux Jazz Festival. Imada recorded in New York as the leader of groups including Grover Washington, Jr., and Steve Khan in 1982 and David Sanborn, Randy Brecker, and Steve Gadd in 1983. He appeared at jazz festivals in Singapore in 1985 and Düsseldorf in 1997. In 1993 his group included his son, the pianist Akira Imada.

(recorded for Three Blind Mice until 1975, and for Alfa from 1981, unless otherwise indicated)

Article

Digby Fairweather

revised by Barry Kernfeld

(Christopher )

(b London, Feb 5, 1942). English pianist . His father was a church organist. He took up piano when he was ten and was mainly self-taught. He first played in nightclubs in 1960–62 while on government service in Hong Kong, monitoring Chinese airfields during the Cold War, and then read languages, specializing in classical Chinese, at Oxford University. After graduating in 1966 he began playing piano in London. During the next ten years he worked with Sandy Brown, Bruce Turner, and Wally Fawkes, and often performed with visiting American musicians, notably Henry “Red” Allen (1968), Pee Wee Russell, Benny Carter, and the expatriate Ben Webster. From 1973 to 1983 he worked in New York and London in a duo and in small groups as music director for Susannah McCorkle, with whom he recorded several albums; they were married, but divorced in the late 1970s. Ingham also recorded in London with Bob Wilber and Bud Freeman (...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama and Barry Kernfeld

(b Gunma, Japan, March 26, 1950). Japanese double bass player. He studied double bass after graduating from high school and began his career in jazz in 1971. Later he performed with the alto saxophonist Hidefumi Toki (1973), Isao Suzuki, Motohiko Hino, Masahiko Sato’s trio (1976), and Kazumi Watanabe, with whom he formed a duo (1977) and played at Berliner Jazztage (1981). He also worked with, among many others, Kosuke Mine, Akira Miyazawa, Masayuki Takayanagi (with whose group he appeared at the International New Jazz Festival Moers in 1980), Terumasa Hino, and Aki Takase (in a duo on a tour of Europe, in a trio, which recorded in 1981, and in a quartet). From 1984 to 1988 Ino performed with Lester Bowie; the two men toured Europe and in 1985 recorded in a duo. During the same period he worked in the Globe Unity Orchestra and in Alex Schlippenbach’s trio with Sunny Murray, and in ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Takarazuka, Japan, Feb 6, 1936). Japanese drummer and leader. He grew up in a musical family and made his professional début at the age of 16. When he was 20 he moved to Tokyo, where he joined the Six Josés, led by the double bass player Shin Watanabe, and then the West Liners, led by the tenor saxophonist Konosuke Saijo. One of the pioneers of modern drumming in Japan, he led several groups of different configurations throughout his career and eventually recorded more than 300 albums. He also formed, with Norio Maeda and the double bass player Yasuo Arakawa, the cooperative group We 3, which was regarded for many years as one of the best jazz trios in Japan. In the early 1960s Inomata lived in the USA and studied drums under Alan Dawson and others. He then returned to Japan, and in 1976 he established his Rhythm Clinic Center to promote educational aspects of jazz. In ...

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Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Osaka, Japan, July 16, 1964). Japanese double bass player. After first playing electric guitar he changed to electric bass guitar as a member of a high school band; he became interested in jazz through the influence of Jaco Pastorius. While studying composition at Osaka College of Music he performed jazz in local clubs. Following his graduation he moved to Tokyo and joined Motohiko Hino’s group, though he also performed and recorded with Masahiko Sato, Masami Nakagawa, Yosuke Yamashita, Terumasa Hino, and others. In January 1991 he settled in New York, where he accompanied such musicians as Abraham Burton, Hank Jones, Cyrus Chestnut, Don Friedman, Carmen Lundy, Eddie Daniels, Dewey Redman, Lee Konitz, Louis Hayes, and Michael Carvin, and recorded as a member of the cooperative Japanese quintet Inside Out (1992), a Japanese and American hard-bop group, the Jazz Networks, led by Roy Hargrove (1995...

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Barry Kernfeld

(b Rangoon, Burma, Dec 1, 1919; d Sydney, Jan 11, 1996). British guitarist . Self-taught, he took up guitar in 1935. While studying chemistry at Rangoon University (BS 1942) he played regularly with Cedric West. In November 1946 he moved to England, where he worked as a freelance musician, played on radio shows with Billy Munn and Ted Heath, performed briefly with Victor Feldman (June 1948), and became a founding member of the BBC Show Band, led by Cyril Stapleton. Later he broadcast on the BBC radio program “Guitar Club” (1955–8) and recorded with Ralph Sharon (1952), George Chisholm and Alan Clare (both 1956), Barney Kessel (1968), and as a leader (1966). He toured and recorded with Stephane Grappelli from 1975 to 1977; deeply devoted to Django Reinhardt’s music, he worked with Diz Disley and Grappelli in association with the Hot Club of London, which was modeled on the Hot Club de France. In the 1970s he also belonged to the cooperative quartet Velvet, other members of which were Digby Fairweather and the guitarist Denny Wright, and he played in a duo with Martin Taylor. In ...

Article

Yozo Iwanami

[Q ]

(b Tokyo, Oct 9, 1931). Japanese tenor and soprano saxophonist and flutist . After attending the Tokyo University of Economics he studied tenor saxophone with the trumpeter Saburo Okada and played at American military bases; the tenor saxophonist School Boy Porter influenced his early style. He worked with Junior Cook, Blue Mitchell, and Stanley Turrentine in Japan and was a member of a group led by the drummer Ricky Nakayama and of the Seven Fukuzin. In ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tochigi, Japan, March 8, 1949). Japanese pianist and leader. He learned piano from the age of eight and started playing jazz while studying piano at the Kunitachi College of Music in Tokyo. Having made his professional début with Sadao Watanabe’s quintet (1971) he later served as a sideman in Terumasa Hino’s quintet (1974–5) and Takeo Moriyama’s quintet (1978–82). From 1975 he led his own trio and other groups. He toured Europe and North America both as a member of Elvin Jones’s Jazz Machine (1985–90) and in Ray Anderson’s group (1990–92). From 1994 to 1995 he played with Leo Etoh’s Wa Daiko (traditional Japanese drumming) group. Itabashi has written scores for several Japanese and Chinese films.

Article

Gary W. Kennedy

[Randall]

(b Slough, England, Jan 23, 1944; d New York, June 13, 2016). English drummer. He taught himself drums from the age of 11 and toured Germany in rhythm-and-blues bands in his teens. Around 1962 he served as the music director for a Japanese-American dance troupe which toured Europe and the Far East. In the mid-1960s he worked for the BBC (1965–7) and then joined Maynard Ferguson’s band, with which he later recorded (1970–73). Having moved to New York (1973), Jones performed as a freelance with, among others, Chet Baker, Gerry Mulligan, Bill Watrous’s big band, Harry James (with whom he also toured), Buddy DeFranco, Jackie Paris, and the singer Anne-Marie Moss. From 1976 to 1978 he taught at Bridgeport University in Connecticut, and in summer 1978 he toured in Dave Brubeck’s quartet, deputizing for Butch Miles; he became Brubeck’s regular drummer several months later, and as such he toured extensively and performed in the Soviet Union (1980s). Among his many recordings with Brubeck are ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Osaka, Japan, Jan 31, 1947). Japanese pianist and composer. He studied piano from the age of eight and played jazz as a teenager, but in 1965 he enrolled at Tokyo University of Fine Arts and Music to study composition and European art music; after receiving his first degree in 1969 he pursued graduate studies in composition at the same institution (MA 1971). In 1971 he enrolled at the Paris Conservoire to study under Olivier Messiaen, and in 1976 he received a premier prix in composition. He made his début as a free-jazz pianist in Paris in 1973, and the following year he joined the trio TOK, with Kent Carter and Oliver Johnson; with TOK he toured in Japan (1978, 1979, 1982) and in Europe (1986). Kako was also a member of Noah Howard’s quartet (1974–6), Masahiko Togashi’s quartet (for a tour of Japan, ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, May 17, 1931). Japanese double bass player. He studied double bass at the age of 19 and in 1951 joined Fumio Nanri’s Hot Peppers. Around 1959 he was a founding member of Shinseiki Ongaku Kenkyusyo (New Century Music Laboratory, a forum for avant-garde musicians), and later he led the Kings Lore Orchestra (1966–74); Masabumi Kikuchi, Masayuki Takayanagi, Masahiko Togashi, Yosuke Yamashita, Terumasa Hino, and many other progressive musicians of the period emerged from this institution and orchestra. Kanai formed the cooperative quartet Jazz Academy, with Kikuchi, Takayanagi, and Togashi, in 1961, and another quartet, with Sadao Watanabe, Norio Maeda, and Takeshi Inomata, in 1964. From 1977 he made many tours and recordings as a member of Takayanagi’s group Tee & Company, and from 1984 he co-led, with Isao Suzuki, an organization for bass players, the Japan Bass Players Club. One of the most aggressive activists in furthering modern jazz and free jazz in Japan, Kanai has remained active with various projects into the new century....

Article

Yozo Iwanami and Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Oita, Japan, March 9, 1948). Japanese pianist and leader. He learned piano from the age of three and later attended Kyushu University, where his father taught music. Although he moved to New York in 1973, he returned to Japan the following year and joined a group led by George Otsuka in 1975. From 1980 to 1985 he was a member of Elvin Jones’s Jazz Machine, with which he toured Europe and the USA, performed frequently in New York, and recorded several albums. After leaving Jones, Karashima performed mainly as an unaccompanied soloist. He led his own quintet from 1988 to 1991 and formed a trio featuring talented young musicians in 1993. As a sideman he performed or recorded with Larry Coryell, Dave Liebman, Tony Williams, Jim Hall, Toots Thielemans, Kazumi Watanabe, Kosuke Mine, and Motohiko Hino, among many others. In the 1990s he often toured Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and Asia....

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, Nov 22, 1967). Japanese trombonist. He started piano lessons at the age of six and took up trombone in a junior high school brass band when he was 13; while still in junior high school he joined Toshiyuki Miyama’s New Herd. Kataoka has performed mainly in big bands, including Sadao Watanabe’s Special Big Band, Takeshi Inomata’s Jazztet, Nobuo Hara’s Sharps and Flats, and George Kawaguchi’s Special Band; he may be heard to advantage on the album ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Osaka, Japan, Dec 17, 1960). Japanese vibraphonist, arranger, and leader. He learned organ from an early age, studied arranging at the age of 15, and took up piano and vibraphone to play in an extracurricular college big band, the High Society Orchestra, at Waseda University in Tokyo. After gaining his degree in electrical engineering (1984) he had private lessons on vibraphone, first in Japan and then in the USA with Gary Burton, the latter while majoring in composition at the Berklee College of Music. He graduated from Berklee in 1988 and returned to Japan. In 1990 he formed his own trio and orchestra, consisting mainly of younger musicians – including schoolmates from Berklee; the orchestra may be heard on Riverside Music Garden (1997, Tei. 28513). Katori has also performed with Yosuke Yamashita (from 1998) and recorded with Mal Waldron (the album Classics, 1999, Tokuma 71621). He is regarded as one of the most talented Japanese arrangers of his generation, and he maintains an active studio career. (...

Article

Yozo Iwanami

[Joji ]

(b Fukakusa, Kyoto, Japan, June 15, 1927; d Tokyo, November 1, 2003). Japanese drummer and leader. He was brought up in Dairen, Manchuria (now Lü-ten, China), in a musical family, and joined his father’s band there when he was 18. After World War II he returned to Japan, and he began playing professionally in 1947. He worked with the Azumanians, a septet, and from 1953 into the 1980s played in the Big Four, whose founding members were Hidehiko Matsumoto, the pianist Hachidai Nakamura, and the double bass player Mitsuru Ono; the group operated and recorded mainly under Kawaguchi’s leadership. In 1981 he recorded as a leader with Art Blakey, and the following year he performed at the Kool Jazz Festival in New York; he gave concerts in Tokyo and Osaka in 1985. In 1987 he deputized for Blakey at the Mount Fuji Jazz Festival. Kawaguchi used two bass drums and was known for his extended solos; he projected strength and vitality as a drummer but was also capable of great delicacy....

Article

Yozo Iwanami and Barry Kernfeld

(b Tokyo, Feb 25, 1947). Japanese guitarist and record producer. He gained a BS degree in physics at Nippon University in Tokyo and first played professionally with the tenor saxophonist Seiichi Nakamura in the 1960s; he also worked with the tenor saxophonist Jiro Inagaki and with Takeshi Inomata. After forming a group with Shigeharu Mukai and the alto saxophonist Hidefumi Toki, in 1973 he moved to New York, where he played with Joe Lee Wilson (1973), Gil Evans (1973–5), Chico Hamilton (for a tour of the USA, c1975>), and Elvin Jones (1976–7), with whom he toured the Americas and Europe and appeared in the documentary film Different Drummer (1979). In 1977–8 he toured Europe with JoAnne Brackeen and worked as a leader. Active from 1979 through the 1980s in computerized music and in the development and utilization of guitar synthesizers, in New York he formed the record company and label Satellites (...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Toyama, Japan, Aug 9, 1966). Japanese tenor saxophonist. He took up piano at the age of six, trumpet at the age of 12, and tenor saxophone when he was 16; a year later he began doubling on the soprano instrument. In 1994 he became a member of Mikio Masuda’s quartet. Later he joined Junko Onishi’s Jazz Workshop (...

Article

Yozo Iwanami

revised by Kazunori Sugiyama

[Poo(-sun)]

(b Tokyo, March 23, 1940; d Manhasset, NY, July 6, 2015). Japanese pianist, composer, and leader. He learned solfeggio from the age of five, took piano lessons from the age of seven, studied composition when he was 13, and attended the high school attached to the Tokyo University of Fine Arts and Music. In 1958 he worked with the tenor saxophonist Takatoshi Oya and the Highway Sons and with a quartet led by Shungo Sawada; his early style as a pianist and composer was influenced by Thelonious Monk. In 1961 he became a member, with Masayuki Takayanagi, Masahiko Togashi, and Hideto Kanai, of the quartet Jazz Academy and worked with Lionel Hampton. He became active as a leader in 1965, played with Sadao Watanabe in 1965–6, and in 1967, with Terumasa Hino, formed a quintet of which the two became joint leaders. Kikuchi left this group the following year and recorded with Charlie Mariano in Tokyo, toured Japan with Sonny Rollins, and then went to the USA to study at the Berklee School of Music. He played with Charles Mingus in ...