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Article

Gaynor G. Jones and Michael Musgrave

(b Wetzlar, Jan 6, 1807; d Berlin, Nov 25, 1883). German editor of folksongs, teacher, choral director and composer. He received his first musical training from his father, Adam Wilhelm Erk, who was Kantor, cathedral organist and teacher at Wetzlar. In 1813 the family moved to Dreieichenhain in Hesse-Darmstadt where Erk took piano, organ and violin lessons. After his father’s death in 1820, he went to Offenbach, where he entered J.B. Spiess’s educational institute (at which he taught from 1824). His music teachers at Offenbach were the composer Johann Anton André, the violinist C. Reinwald and the organist J.C.H. Rinck. In 1826 he was offered a temporary appointment at the teachers’ seminary at Moers on the lower Rhine; he founded and directed many music festivals in this area (including the Remscheid, Ruhrort and Duisburg festivals), and also performed as a piano soloist and in ensembles. He accepted a teaching appointment at the Royal Seminary in Berlin in ...

Article

William McClellan

revised by Daniel Goldmark

(b Pelham, NY, Dec 12, 1910; d New York, NY, Nov 18, 1996). American music publisher and administrator. The son of Tin Pan Alley innovator Leo Feist, he studied at Yale University (BA 1932) and completed graduate work at Columbia University (1933–4). During his early career he held executive positions with Leo Feist, Inc. (1932–5) and Century Music Publishing Co.–Mercury Music Corp. (1936–56). He served as president of Associated Music Publishers (1956–64), and in 1965 took up an appointment with the National Music Publishers Association (a trade association of popular music publishers), of which he became president in 1976. From 1963 to 1979 he attended to the affairs of the National Music Council, holding several board positions. He was also involved with the Music Publishers Association of the United States (president 1952–4), the National Academy of Popular Music, and the Copyright Society of the USA. Through articles, papers, and speeches, Feist promoted effective copyright protection for music and furthered many other causes of the music trades....

Article

Frank Dobbins

[Dauphin, Dauphiné]

(fl Paris, 1538–66). French printer and bookseller. He was active in Paris as a publisher from 1538 to 1566, dealing specifically with music between 1551 and 1558. From the Hostel d’Albret on Mont St Hilaire he published literary works by François Habert (1549, 1551, 1557, 1560), Michael Beuther (1551), François Rabelais (1552), Marc-Claude de Buttet (1561) and others, using four different marks: a pheasant and dolphin, a winged Mercury, a snake with the motto ‘Ne la mort ne le venin’ and a heron holding a dolphin in its claws. He collaborated with other publishers including Nicolas Buffet (1543), Jérome de Marnef (c1550), Vincent Sertenas (1551), Jean Vincent (1554), Robert Granjon (1550–51) and Guillaume Morlaye (1552–8).

His activity in music began on 23 December 1550 when he signed a ten-year contract with Robert Granjon. The association may have realized around 14 books between ...

Article

Forsyth  

Margaret Cranmer

English firm of publishers and music and instrument dealers. The brothers Henry Forsyth (d July 1885) and James Forsyth (b 1833; d Manchester, Jan 2, 1907) were the third generation of Forsyths to work for Broadwood; they started their own business in Manchester in 1857, selling, hiring, tuning and repairing pianos. They published music from 1858, but this activity became important only in 1873, when they produced the first numbers of Charles Hallé’s Practical Pianoforte School and opened a London publishing house at Oxford Circus. Their list grew to include works by Stephen Heller (a friend of Hallé), Berlioz, Stanford and Delius. The firm also shared significantly in the management of leading concerts in Manchester, in particular the Hallé concerts. In 1901 the firm became a limited company; it now sells pianos, orchestral and school instruments, sheet music by all publishers and records. James’s son Algernon Forsyth (...

Article

Frank Dobbins

(fl Paris, 1690–1719/20). French music dealer and publisher. It is not known whether he was related to earlier publishers with the same family name, none of whom was apparently involved in music printing. Like other 18th-century music dealers, Henri Foucault was associated with the corporation of haberdashers and jewellers rather than that of the booksellers. He was originally a paper seller, with a shop ‘A la règle d’or’, rue St Honoré, but seems to have branched out from this trade by 28 June 1690, when a condemnation issued by the Conseil d’Etat accused him – in association with the engraver Henri de Baussen – of contravening Christophe Ballard’s royal privilege by publishing ‘divers airs de musique’. Two years later Foucault’s name appears on the title-page of Marais’s Pièces en trio pour les flûtes, violons et dessus de viole, in association with Hurel, Bonneüil and the composer, but he is still designated simply as ‘marchand papetier’. However by ...

Article

Kornel Michałowski

(b Kraków, Aug 7, 1811; d Warsaw, July 20, 1873). Polish bookseller and music publisher. He worked in the bookshop run, by his father, Jan Jerzy Fryderyk Friedlein, in Kraków, then from 1834 with E. Günther in Leszno. In 1839 he entered into partnership with F. Spiess’s Warsaw firm, which he bought in 1848 and managed from 1851 under his own name. Friedlein’s became one of the leading bookshops in Warsaw, being well stocked and providing a lending service. Soon after 1840 he also began to publish music, maintaining a high musical standard in the compositions he issued. His printing works were technically advanced: he was the first Warsaw publisher to number his plates, and he was also the first to print Moniuszko’s works. In about 1860 Friedlein was in financial difficulties and sold some of his editions to the firm newly established by Gebethner and Wolff, both of whom had been his pupils. After the January Insurrection (...

Article

Wolfgang Boetticher

(bap. Nuremberg, Sept 2, 1574; d Nuremberg, Dec 1616). German publisher, bookseller, engraver, editor and lutenist. According to the foreword of his Testudo gallo-germanica Fuhrmann attended ‘German and French high schools and universities’; there are records of him studying in Jena (1597), Marburg (1599), Tübingen (1601) and Basel (1604), where he received a broad education. He then worked in Nuremberg, where in 1608 he took over the typographical workshop of his father, Valentin, who had published mathematical and theological works and was also known for publishing music and theoretical works. Composers whose music was published by Fuhrmann include Melchior Franck, J.A. Herbst and Demantius.

For musicians Fuhrmann is of particular interest for his anthology of lute music Testudo gallo-germanica, hoc est: novae et nunquam antehac editae recreationes musicae, ad testudinis asum et tabulaturam (RISM 161524/R1975, published in Nuremberg). It comprises 180 pages and includes a German translation of Anthoine Francisque’s ...

Article

Darlene Graves and Michael Graves

[William J. ]

(b Alexandria, IN, March 28, 1936). American gospel songwriter, performer, producer, and publisher. He grew up on a small farm in Indiana and graduated from Anderson College with a major in English and a minor in music. He went on to receive a master’s degree in guidance and counseling and met his future wife and song-producing partner, Gloria Sickal, while both were teaching high school. Gaither started singing gospel music as a child and in 1956 formed the Bill Gaither Trio with his brother Danny and his sister Mary Ann. He started his own publishing company in 1959. He continued to perform and compose while a teacher at Alexandria High School and in 1961 formed the Gaither Music Company to publish his works. After their marriage in 1962, Gaither and his wife wrote their first major song, “He touched me,” which was a significant hit by 1963. He re-formed the Bill Gaither Trio with Gloria and Danny, and in ...

Article

Carolyn Gianturco

(b Chieti, May 30, 1892; d Grottaferrata, nr Rome, May 10, 1973). Italian musicologist, editor and administrator. He began to play the violin when he was six and the piano when he was 12, and after schooling in Chieti he studied engineering at the University of Turin (1909–14). At 20 he was made editor-in-chief of the weekly Riforma musicale, published in 1913–15 and briefly in 1918; concurrently he organized concerts of contemporary chamber music in Turin. He founded and edited Il pianoforte (1920–27), which in 1928 became the Rassegna musicale (later with Ronga and Mila as co-editors); after an interruption during the war (1944–6) it moved to Rome (1947), where it subsequently became Quaderni della Rassegna musicale (1962). He also founded Studi musicali (1972–3). The first Congresso Italiano di Musica (Turin, 1921) was held partly under the auspices of Gatti's journal ...

Article

Niall O’Loughlin

(Adam )

(b ?Ritzfeld bei Weinsberg, Germany, c1772/3; d London, England, March 27, 1850). Maker of wind instruments, music seller, and publisher. He was in London by 1795 and was naturalized by Act of Parliament in 1804; that same year he was granted the freedom of the Musicians’ Company. He worked at 76 Bishopsgate from about 1804 to 1822. Through a partnership with the successors to George Astor the firm became known as Gerock, Astor & Co. (1822–6), operating at 79 Cornhill. Robert Wolf, described as an employee in 1828, married Gerock’s daughter Sabrina Susannah in 1831. The firm was known as Gerock & Wolf during 1831–2, but reverted to the name C. Gerock & Co. from 1832 to 1837, when Gerock retired. The firm of Robert Wolf & Co. operated at 79 Cornhill after 1837, principally selling pianos.

In a trial for theft of flutes by his employee Samuel Porter in ...

Article

James R. Hines, Barbara Turchin and Nicholas Michael Butler

(b Hesse-Kassel, Germany, c1786; d New York, NY, July 30, 1829). American theater manager, pianist, organist, composer, and music publisher of German birth. He moved to the United States at the end of the 18th century and was probably related to the musician George Gilfert who was in New York as early at 1789. In his first New York advertisement in 1800, he was described as a musician “lately from Europe.” The New York directory of 1805 lists him as a music teacher in that city, but in 1806 he migrated to Charleston, South Carolina, with a number of other theater musicians. He presented his first concert there on 3 March 1807 and quickly became a favorite member of the local music scene. In December 1809 he became the organist of St. John’s Lutheran Church, and in December 1810 he opened a music store in partnership with a fellow German musician, Philip Muck, under the name C. Gilfert and Company. This institution chiefly sold imported instruments, accessories, and music, but in early ...

Article

Daniel Zager

(b New York, Dec 18, 1928; d Feb 23, 2019). American writer. After attending the University of Missouri (1946–50) and Columbia University (1950) he worked for Prestige Records (1950–55). With Leonard Feather he collaborated on The Encyclopedia of Jazz (1955), for which he was an assistant writer and editor, and The Encyclopedia of Jazz in the Sixties (1966), and he was an author with Feather of The Encyclopedia of Jazz in the Seventies (1976) and the Biographical Encyclopedia of Jazz (1999). Gitler wrote for such periodicals as Metronome, Jazz Magazine, Down Beat (of which he was an associate editor), and Jazz Times, produced film scripts on Louis Armstrong and Lionel Hampton for the US Information Service, and was a commentator for radio station WBAI, New York; he also taught at CUNY. Among his more notable writings is ...

Article

Marie Cornaz

(b Saint Samson, 1740; d Brussels, Dec 24, 1806). French bookseller, publisher and agent, active in Brussels. First a seller of engravings, he became one of the principal music sellers in Brussels from 1774. He published the works of Honauer, Pauwels and G. Ferrari, and made a request to the Milan engraver C.G. Barbieri to publish the works of C.-L.-J. André. Godefroy was also the Brussels agent for numerous Parisian publishers, his name appearing on the title-page of publications by La Chevardière (for the works of Anfossi and Paisiello), Sieber (Cramer, Haydn, Kammel), Durieu (Dalayrac), Heina (Eichner, J.A. Lorenziti, Vanhal), Mmes Le Menu and Boyer (J.H. Schröter), J.-P. Deroullède (B. Lorenziti, Pieltain, Anton Stamitz), Mondhare (Staes), Bailleux (Chevalier de Saint-Georges) and Camand (Jean Cremont). Being the Brussels agent for Heina, Godefroy was the first to distribute the music of Mozart in Brussels with a Parisian edition of the op.4 piano sonatas....

Article

Samuel F. Pogue

revised by Frank Dobbins

(fl Lyons, 1550–84). French music printer, bookseller, composer and instrumentalist. In 1551 he prepared the third in a series of four books of music for guitar printed in Paris by Robert Granjon and Michel Fezandat (RISM 1551²²). In the dedication Gorlier wrote apologetically of the four-course guitar and his reasons for composing for an inferior instrument, saying that he wanted to show that it was as capable as larger instruments of reproducing music in two or three parts. Besides being an ‘excellent joueur’ on the guitar, as cited on the title-page, he evidently played the spinet; in a pamphlet (now lost) concerning Loys Bourgeois’ Droict chemin de musique (1550) Bourgeois called him ‘trougnon d’épinette’ (‘garbage of the spinet’) and complained that he had not been educated in classical languages and mathematics like the singer-composers in Lyons, Layolle Roussel and Jambe de Fer.

Gorlier was granted a privilege for printing music on ...

Article

Zofia Chechlińska

(b Kęty, nr Kraków, Dec 7, 1782; d Kraków, July 4, 1868). Polish bookseller and historian. In 1797 he began working in Groebel’s bookshop in Kraków, and there came into contact with a number of leading historians who aroused his fascination in the subject. After 20 years Grabowski opened his own bookshop, which he eventually closed in 1837 in order to devote himself exclusively to collecting historical material. His work in this field resulted in several books between 1840 and 1854, and also a number of articles published mainly in Biblioteka Warszawska (1850–65). These writings contain information on general Polish history, art history and the history of Kraków, and also a great deal of valuable material derived from primary sources concerning music and musicians in Poland. It was through Grabowski that historical interest in musical matters was first aroused in Poland. (PSB, K. Estreicher)

Dawne zabytki miasta Krakowa...

Article

John H. Baron

(b Hohenhofen, Germany, 1827; d New Orleans, LA, March 1, 1915).

American music publisher, instrument maker, and impresario. He immigrated to the United States in 1852 and settled in New Orleans, where he became organist at three local churches. In 1858 he opened a music store and sold instruments and sheet music. From 1874 he also managed the Grunewald Opera House, a major concert hall; this was destroyed by fire in 1893, and he built the Grunewald Hotel (now the Roosevelt) on the same site. Before and after the Civil War he was one of the important benefactors of concerts in the city. The Grunewald firm, with which other members of the family became involved, manufactured musical instruments in the late 19th century and published a large quantity of music from 1870 to 1920, when G. Schirmer purchased the publishing concern. The music store remained open until 1972...

Article

Teresa Chylińska

(b Rothenburg, c?1467; d Kraków, 7 or Oct 8, 1525). Polish publisher and bookseller of German birth. Granted the first royal privilege issued in Poland, he began its earliest publishing business in Kraków in 1494. In 1503 he issued the Missale Wratislaviense in which the music in Gothic notation was printed from movable type in two colours. Possibly on his initiative, the German printer Kasper Hochfeder went to Kraków in 1503 and from 1505 to 1509 served as the firm’s technical manager. Haller’s output of about 250 publications included scientific books, university textbooks, state documents and liturgical books. In the field of music he is principally known for the printing of Bogurodzica (the knights’ hymn), and two treatises by Sebastian z Felsztyna, Modus regulariter accentuandi (1518) and Opusculum musicae compilatum (1517) in addition to the missal.

Przywecka-SameckaDM ‘Haller Jan’, Słownik pracowników książki polskiej...

Article

(b New York, July 12, 1895; d Doylestown, PA, Aug 23, 1960). American lyricist, librettist, producer and publisher. Born into a notable theatrical family, his grandfather and namesake was the flamboyant opera impresario Oscar Hammerstein (1847–1919), who created and lost a handful of opera houses and companies around the turn of the century. Oscar studied law at Columbia where he became involved in the Varsity shows and, after graduation, continued to write songs. By ...

Article

David Johnson

revised by Kenneth Elliott

(d Edinburgh, Dec 1621). Scottish bookseller and printer. By 1589 he was an importer of foreign books; in 1601 his name appeared in a psalm book printed in Dordrecht, the Netherlands, to be sold in Scotland. In 1610 he became a publisher in Edinburgh, issuing a famous folio Bible in that year and many psalters (with the melodies), as well as books of Scottish court poetry, mathematics and theology. One of the most interesting of the psalters is that of 1615 in which, for the first time, the 12 Common Tunes were printed as a group and given distinctive titles.

After Hart’s death, his widow (d Edinburgh, 3 May 1642) published more psalm books with the imprint ‘the Heires of Andro Hart’. Among these is the most important 17th-century Scottish church music publication, the 1635 psalter, which contains 143 psalm settings, nearly all by Scottish composers: 104 of Proper Tunes, 31 of Common Tunes and 8 imitative settings ‘in reports’....

Article