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Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Yokosuka, Japan, Oct 21, 1966). Japanese trumpeter and leader. He took up trumpet at the age of 11 and began to play jazz in clubs in Nagoya while attending the university there. In 1989 he moved to Tokyo, where he performed with Atsushi Ikeda’s quintet, the quintet led by the tenor saxophonist Makoto Oka, X-Bar Unit, led by the pianist and keyboard player Makoto Kiriya, and the bands of Yutaka Shiina, Motohiko Hino, Junko Onishi, and the guitarist and keyboard player Koichi Hiroki. His principal activity from 1992 has been as co-leader with Masahiko Osaka of a hard-bop and modal-jazz quintet. He also recorded as a sole leader (1997, 1998), on the latter occasion with Jimmy Heath, John Hicks, Reggie Workman, and Jimmy Cobb as his sidemen. Hara teaches at Senzoku Junior College.

(all recorded for King)

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, Feb 26, 1960). Japanese alto and soprano saxophonist and leader. She began piano lessons at the age of five and took up alto saxophone in her junior high school brass band when she was 13. While at Tamagawa University she studied jazz and classical saxophone. She performed in Yosuke Yamashita’s Panja Swing Orchestra and with the band led by the reed player Yoshiaki Fujikawa in 1983, and toured Europe in Hans Reichel’s trio in 1987. In the 1990s she performed with the drummer Yuji Imamura, Hideto Kanai, Shota Koyama, Fumio Itabashi, and Peter Kowald, and in 1997 she became a member of the small group and orchestra led by the pianist Satoko Fujii. Her own group, Stir Up!, made its début at the Shinjuku Pit Inn in Tokyo in 1992. From 1998 Hayasaka has also led Black Out, a group that is principally a saxophone quartet but which is sometimes augmented by double bass or double bass and drums. She composed the score for the film ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, Jan 1, 1950). Japanese alto saxophonist. He started on piano and took up alto saxophone to play in a brass band at junior high school. While at senior high school he sat in with Yosuke Yamashita’s group, and later he worked as a sideman with Yamashita (1980–84); he also joined Aki Takase’s quartet, Masahiko Togashi’s group, and Takeshi Shibuya’s orchestra. In the 1990s Hayashi led the group Mazuru (1990–92) and recorded with Takase’s septet (1994), the pianist Osamu Ichikawa (1996), and Junko Onishi (1997). He doubles on soprano, tenor, and baritone saxophones.

(recorded for Omagatoki unless otherwise indicated)

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Takamatsu, Japan, July 19, 1956). Japanese drummer. Self-taught, he took up drums at the age of 12 and made his professional début when he was 15. He joined the trio led by the pianist Takehisa Tanaka in 1977 and made his first recording the following year. While performing and recording with Naniwa Express, one of the most successful jazz fusion bands in Japan (1981–6), he played with Toshiyuki Honda (1983–9) and Kazumi Watanabe (1985–94). Later he was a member of Tiger Okoshi’s group (1989–90), and he worked with Takashi Furuya, the pianists Osamu Ichikawa and Sadayasu Fujii, Terumasa Hino, and the Hammond organ player Toshihiko Kankawa. Higashihara led a quartet featuring Junko Onishi, and from 1997 he co-led the group Yajyu Okoku, with the keyboard player Hiroyuki Naniwa, the guitarist Hirokuni Korekata, and the double bass player Yoshihiro Naruse. He also produced a series of concerts....

Article

Yozo Iwanami

revised by Kazunori Sugiyama

[Toko ]

(b Tokyo, Jan 3, 1946; d Tokyo, May 13, 1999). Japanese drummer and leader , brother of Terumasa Hino. He worked professionally as a tap-dancer from the age of eight and as a drummer from 1963. After playing with a quartet led by the tenor saxophonist Konosuke Saijo, with the Stardusters, and with quintets led by Shungo Sawada and by his brother, he formed his own trio. He moved to New York in 1978 to join JoAnne Brackeen’s trio, recorded with Bob Degen in Germany that same year, and played in the USA with Hugh Masekela, Joe Henderson, and Gary Bartz, among others. In 1980 he returned to Japan, where he rejoined his brother’s band, and from 1995 he toured Japan and the USA as a member of Terumasa Hino’s Asian Jazz All Stars. He played with Aki Takase, Nobuyoshi Ino, Dizzy Gillespie, Eddie Gomez, Pat Metheny, John Scofield, Kenny Kirkland, and many others while leading his own bands, and in the 1990s he recorded with Dave Liebman, Scofield, Mike Stern, and Steve Swallow among his guest soloists. In ...

Article

Yozo Iwanami

revised by Kazunori Sugiyama and Barry Kernfeld

(b Tokyo, Oct 25, 1942). Japanese trumpeter, cornetist, flugelhorn player, and leader, brother of Motohiko Hino. His father was a tap-dancer and trumpeter, and Hino began tap-dancing at the age of four and took up trumpet when he was nine. Self-taught, he made his professional début in 1955, playing in a swing big band at a US military base. In 1964 he joined a quintet led by the drummer Hideo Shiraki (with whom he appeared at the Berliner Jazztage the following year), and in 1967 he formed a quintet with Masabumi Kikuchi; Kikuchi left in 1968 and Hino continued as the group’s sole leader. After his album Hi-nology (1969) achieved great success he performed at the Berliner Jazztage (1971) and at many other festivals. From the mid-1970s he recorded regularly in Japan, Europe, and the USA (he settled in New York in June 1975...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Iwata, Japan, Aug 21, 1945; d Tokyo, January 12, 2006). Japanese pianist and leader, father of Tamaya Honda. He learned piano from the age of five and began his professional career with the quartet led by the tenor saxophonist Kazunori Takeda while attending the Kunitachi College of Music in Tokyo. Having formed his own trio, he started recording in 1969. In 1973 he joined Sadao Watanabe’s quartet, then became co-leader, with Kosuke Mine, of a highly successful jazz-fusion group, Native Son; this group performed in São Paulo, Brazil, at the Montreux Jazz Festival, and at the Bottom Line and Seventh Avenue South in New York. Honda also worked with Motohiko Hino (who took part in a number of his recording sessions from the 1970s into the 1990s), Hiroshi Murakami, Hiroshi Fukumura, Shigeharu Mukai, Ron Carter and Tony Williams (who made up Honda’s trio for recordings in 1977...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, Nov 25, 1969). Japanese drummer, son of Takehiro Honda. His mother is the jazz singer Chiko Honda, and he is a nephew of Sadao Watanabe and Fumio Watanabe. Self-taught from a young age, he first performed when he was 13 at the jazz festival at Madarao with the fusion group Native Son, led by his father and Kosuke Mine. Later he was a member of Native Son (1985–92), as well as of Masabumi Kikuchi’s trio (1993), Sadao Watanabe’s quartet (1995), and Kimiko Itoh’s group (1995–7). Honda led his own trio from 1994 and a fusion band from 1997 (which recorded the album Planet X, 1999, Somethin’ Else 68047). At the same time he performed in trios led by his father (from 1990), Fumio Karashima (from 1992, with whom he recorded Open the Gate, 1996, Pol. POCJ1359), and Kazumi Watanabe (from ...

Article

Yozo Iwanami

revised by Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, April 9, 1957). Japanese alto and soprano saxophonist, flutist, and leader. His father was the jazz critic Toshiyuki Honda. He taught himself to play saxophone and flute during his high school years, joined a sextet led by George Otsuka in 1976, and the following year formed the group Burning Waves. In 1983 he recorded with Chick Corea. He played with Kazumi Watanabe and wrote arrangements for Tatsuya Takahashi’s album Beauties (1985, TDK T28P1007). Honda began his career as a jazz-rock player, but from 1985 he worked in a more conventional jazz idiom as the leader of the Super Quartet. In 1987 he formed the group Radio Club and started working in film music; after his first effort, Taxing Woman, won several awards, he became deeply involved in composing for films, television, and commercials, though he also produced recordings by pop artists.

Article

Walter Ojakäär

[Oganesyan [Khovanesyan], Tatevik]

(b Yerevan, Armenian SSR [now Armenia], June 3, 1955). Armenian singer and educator. She grew up in a musical family and began singing jazz as a child; when she was 13 she made her first recording, a version of Harold Arlen’s It’s only a paper moon, for Armenian radio. Having studied choral conducting at the Melikyan Music School in Yerevan (graduating in 1974) she sang with the Armenian State Variety Orchestra under the bandleader Konstantin Orbelyan (1974–7); later she worked with groups led by Igor Bril, Vladimir Chekasin, Aleksey Kuznetsov, Lembit Saarsalu, and Tiit Paulus. Her international career began at festivals in Belgrade (1978) and Debrecen, Hungary (1985); later she performed throughout Europe, as well as in Africa, Asia, Australia, and the USA, where she settled in 1989. Before leaving the USSR she recorded Dnevnïe mechtï (1986, Mel. C60 23665000), and she was the soloist in a concerto for voice and orchestra by Konstantin Petrosyan, recorded that same year. In the USA she sang with Frank Wess, Larry Willis, Ben Riley, Paquito D’Rivera, and others, and recorded the albums ...

Article

Mary Talusan

(b Anaheim, CA, Nov 15, 1970). American jazz percussionist and composer. Of Filipino heritage, Ibarra grew up in Houston, Texas. She received a music diploma from Mannes College and a BA from Goddard College. She studied drums with Buster Smith and Vernel Fournier and percussion with Milford Graves. She also played with William Parker and his big band, The Little Huey Creative Music Orchestra. In the 1990s, Ibarra became interested in Philippine musical traditions and took lessons on kulintang from master artist Danongan Kalanduyan. She joined the avant-garde free jazz quartet led by David S. Ware and became well known in the New York jazz scene. She collaborated on several albums with a number of respected musicians such as Assif Tsahar, Cooper-Moore, Charles Burnham, Chris Speed, Wadada Leo Smith, and Pauline Oliveros, notably on the album ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, June 2, 1932). Japanese alto saxophonist. Self-taught, he took up saxophone at the age of 19. After playing in 1952 with Shungo Sawada’s group, in 1954 he joined the pianist Shotaro Moriyasu, who suggested that he study Charlie Parker’s music. Thereafter he played mainly with big bands: the West Liners (1955–60), Nobuo Hara and his Sharps and Flats (1960–70), the Blue Coats (1970–80), and Shigenori Obara and his Joyful Orchestra, in which Igarashi has served as concertmaster from 1978. He is known for his warm tone and relaxed swing, both after the manner of Johnny Hodges.

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Kitami, Hokkaido, Japan, Jan 17, 1965). Japanese trumpeter. He began on piano when he was four and took up trumpet at the age of ten after purchasing an album by Miles Davis. In 1985 he moved to Tokyo to attend Kunitachi College of Music. In the late 1980s he joined the New Tide Jazz Orchestra, the Japanese Jazz Messengers, the group led by the tenor saxophonist Seiichi Nakamura, and Motohiko Hino’s ensemble 196X. He also played with Kazumi Watanabe, Fumio Karashima, Takehiro Honda, Tommy Flanagan, Duke Jordan, Ray Bryant, and Kenny Barron, among others. In 1993 he appeared, together with Hino, in Aki Takase’s group at Jazzfest Berlin; later he toured Germany (1994, 1996). In New York in 1996 Igarashi held a brief engagement at Birdland and appeared in a concert at Town Hall with Roy Haynes, Stanley Turrentine, and others.

(recorded for Toys Factory unless otherwise indicated)...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Yokohama, Japan, Feb 19, 1963). Japanese alto and soprano saxophonist. He took up alto saxophone while in high school and later studied the instrument at Kunitachi College of Music, Tokyo, from which he graduated in 1986. From 1990 to 1995 he lived in the USA, where he joined Marcus Belgrave’s group, studied under Pete Yellin, and performed with Wynton Marsalis, Junior Mance, Jesse Davis, and others. After returning to Japan in ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Osaka, Japan, Jan 1, 1942). Japanese double bass player and leader. He studied classical double bass from the age of 18 and had lessons with Gary Peacock when he was 23. Later he played in groups led by the pianist Yuji Ohno, Masahiko Sato, Sadao Watanabe, Masabumi Kikuchi, Terumasa Hino, Aki Takase, and Akira Miyazawa, among many others. In ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, March 21, 1932). Japanese pianist and leader. He studied classical piano privately and led student jazz bands while attending Meiji University. After graduating and then working for a year as a businessman he became a professional musician, and in 1953 he joined Eiji Kitamura’s group and the West Liners. He led a trio from 1964 and a jazz fusion group, Now’in, from 1984. In 1979 he performed with the Inner Galaxy Orchestra at the Montreux Jazz Festival. Imada recorded in New York as the leader of groups including Grover Washington, Jr., and Steve Khan in 1982 and David Sanborn, Randy Brecker, and Steve Gadd in 1983. He appeared at jazz festivals in Singapore in 1985 and Düsseldorf in 1997. In 1993 his group included his son, the pianist Akira Imada.

(recorded for Three Blind Mice until 1975, and for Alfa from 1981, unless otherwise indicated)

Article

Digby Fairweather

revised by Barry Kernfeld

(Christopher )

(b London, Feb 5, 1942). English pianist . His father was a church organist. He took up piano when he was ten and was mainly self-taught. He first played in nightclubs in 1960–62 while on government service in Hong Kong, monitoring Chinese airfields during the Cold War, and then read languages, specializing in classical Chinese, at Oxford University. After graduating in 1966 he began playing piano in London. During the next ten years he worked with Sandy Brown, Bruce Turner, and Wally Fawkes, and often performed with visiting American musicians, notably Henry “Red” Allen (1968), Pee Wee Russell, Benny Carter, and the expatriate Ben Webster. From 1973 to 1983 he worked in New York and London in a duo and in small groups as music director for Susannah McCorkle, with whom he recorded several albums; they were married, but divorced in the late 1970s. Ingham also recorded in London with Bob Wilber and Bud Freeman (...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama and Barry Kernfeld

(b Gunma, Japan, March 26, 1950). Japanese double bass player. He studied double bass after graduating from high school and began his career in jazz in 1971. Later he performed with the alto saxophonist Hidefumi Toki (1973), Isao Suzuki, Motohiko Hino, Masahiko Sato’s trio (1976), and Kazumi Watanabe, with whom he formed a duo (1977) and played at Berliner Jazztage (1981). He also worked with, among many others, Kosuke Mine, Akira Miyazawa, Masayuki Takayanagi (with whose group he appeared at the International New Jazz Festival Moers in 1980), Terumasa Hino, and Aki Takase (in a duo on a tour of Europe, in a trio, which recorded in 1981, and in a quartet). From 1984 to 1988 Ino performed with Lester Bowie; the two men toured Europe and in 1985 recorded in a duo. During the same period he worked in the Globe Unity Orchestra and in Alex Schlippenbach’s trio with Sunny Murray, and in ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Takarazuka, Japan, Feb 6, 1936). Japanese drummer and leader. He grew up in a musical family and made his professional début at the age of 16. When he was 20 he moved to Tokyo, where he joined the Six Josés, led by the double bass player Shin Watanabe, and then the West Liners, led by the tenor saxophonist Konosuke Saijo. One of the pioneers of modern drumming in Japan, he led several groups of different configurations throughout his career and eventually recorded more than 300 albums. He also formed, with Norio Maeda and the double bass player Yasuo Arakawa, the cooperative group We 3, which was regarded for many years as one of the best jazz trios in Japan. In the early 1960s Inomata lived in the USA and studied drums under Alan Dawson and others. He then returned to Japan, and in 1976 he established his Rhythm Clinic Center to promote educational aspects of jazz. In ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Osaka, Japan, July 16, 1964). Japanese double bass player. After first playing electric guitar he changed to electric bass guitar as a member of a high school band; he became interested in jazz through the influence of Jaco Pastorius. While studying composition at Osaka College of Music he performed jazz in local clubs. Following his graduation he moved to Tokyo and joined Motohiko Hino’s group, though he also performed and recorded with Masahiko Sato, Masami Nakagawa, Yosuke Yamashita, Terumasa Hino, and others. In January 1991 he settled in New York, where he accompanied such musicians as Abraham Burton, Hank Jones, Cyrus Chestnut, Don Friedman, Carmen Lundy, Eddie Daniels, Dewey Redman, Lee Konitz, Louis Hayes, and Michael Carvin, and recorded as a member of the cooperative Japanese quintet Inside Out (1992), a Japanese and American hard-bop group, the Jazz Networks, led by Roy Hargrove (1995...