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Aligogo  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Slit drum of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Two kinds exist: a small zoomorphic form among the Mamvu people and a trapezoidal form among the Bari and Bangba of the northeastern DRC.

F.J. de Hen: Beitrag zur Kenntnis der Musikinstrumente aus Belgisch Kongo und Ruanda-Urundi...

Article

Alimba  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Xylophone of the Kusu people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has seven or eight bars laid loosely on two banana-tree logs about one metre long and placed about 70 cm apart.

G.H.R. Knosp: Enquête sur la vie musicale au Congo Belge, vol.3 (Tervuren, 1968), 27....

Article

Alindi  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Double-headed drum of the Komo and Lega peoples of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is conical, 40 to 50 cm tall, head diameter 25 to 30 cm, foot diameter 10 to 20 cm. The wild-goat-skin heads are laced together in a V pattern and the upper head is beaten with a stick in one hand and also by the other hand. It is used only to accompany dances....

Article

Allun  

Frame drum of the Berber people, particularly of Morocco (the High Atlas). Its width varies from 40 to 75 cm and its depth from 8 to 15 cm. It is similar to the bendīr, but usually has no snares.

B. Lortat-Jacob: Musique et fêtes au Haut-Atlas...

Article

Alo  

Jeremy Montagu

Large clapperless bell of the Igbo people of Nigeria. It is a single bell, made of forged iron, 90 to 120 cm tall, and is struck by a wooden beater with soft padding around the end. Its main use is by women’s groups to accompany singing and for the ...

Article

Aluti  

Side-blown animal horn of the Teso people of Uganda. The name aluti is attributed to the Mbale district, aluut to the Usuku area. The aluut is blown to summon assemblies and on ceremonial occasions. In regions adjoining Karamoja it is used by herdboys to scare away hyenas....

Article

Peter Cooke

Pentatonic log xylophone of the Ganda people of Uganda. Traditionally it consisted of 12 wooden bars made preferably from the lusambya tree (Markhamia platycalyx) which are laid in scale order across freshly felled banana trunks and held in place by tall sticks pushed into the trunks between the keys as spacers. On better instruments they are further anchored in place by fibre nooses, which are attached to the bars and hooked over adjacent spacers. The bars are tuned by reducing their thickness mostly on the underside of the middle third of the bar, thus flattening the pitch; sharpening is achieved by bevelling away the underside of both ends....

Article

Ankle rattles of the Zulu people of southern Africa, worn by dancers. The Swazi emafahlawane and Mpondo (Xhosa) amahlahlazo are similar. They comprise either a number of cocoons or small palm-leaf boxes containing small stones, fastened to a fibre cord for tying round the ankles. The cocoon type is also called ...

Article

F.J. de Hen

Notched flute of the Hutu of Rwanda. It is made of bamboo with three or four fingerholes placed to suit the player, usually a herdsman who makes his own flute. The similar umwilenge has two fingerholes.

Article

Clappers of the Zulu people of southern Africa. Like the marapo of the Tswana, they are made from a pair of rib bones and are used for rhythmic song-accompaniment.

P.R. Kirby: The Musical Instruments of the Native Races of South Africa (London, 1934, 2/1965), 10, and pl.5....

Article

Ambimbo  

F.J. de Hen

Wooden whistle of the Makere of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. There are two types: a cylindrical, stopped whistle threaded onto a cord or wire either singly or in a set, and a whistle with a slender conical bore. These are probably used for hunting and signalling. (...

Article

Amor  

F.J. de Hen

Drum of the Alur of eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, reserved for the use of the king. The two cowhide heads are laced together with leather thongs on the wooden shell. It is beaten with two sticks, or by two men each beating one head with two sticks. (...

Article

Amponga  

Generic term current in Madagascar for percussion instruments. It includes cylindrical drums such as amponga ntaolo (‘ancestors’ drum’) and the ground zither amponga tany (‘earthen drum’).

Article

Wooden whistle of the Dogon people of Mali.

Article

Andzolo  

F.J. de Hen

Metal handbell of the Bandia of the Buta region in the northern Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is played in dance music, with drums and Akiri bells.

Article

Jeremy Montagu

Oboe with five equidistant fingerholes, found in the northwest of Madagascar. It is an uncommon instrument and is of Arab origin. The kabiry is larger and probably of Comorian origin. Nowadays the name anjomara also denotes a European oboe introduced under the Merina monarchy in the 19th century....

Article

Malagasy term for trumpets. Each type of instrument has its own local name.

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Hand drum of Ghana.

Article

Aporo  

Peter Cooke

End-blown trumpet of the Labwor and Nyakwai peoples of Karamoja, Uganda. It is an open tube of aporo wood (hence the name) up to 91 cm long and 5.5 cm in diameter. The aporo is played by women, chiefly for their acut dance and is blown into at either end with the cheeks well distended and the hands holding it in the middle. It sounds not unlike a foghorn. A number of ...

Article

Apwanga  

F.J. de Hen

Side-blown ivory trumpet of the Kango of the northern-central Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has a carved mouthpiece and one fingerhole in the tip. (LaurentyA, 370)