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Beru  

Article

Betene  

Monique Brandily

Side-blown horn of the Kotoko people of central Chad and northern Cameroon. The horn is either from a bubal antelope or a damalisk (both types of hartebeest antelope); a rectangular mouthhole is cut in the side. A cowhorn bell is glued on with beeswax and then tied to the instrument. A little calabash lid, hanging from the horn on a cord, closes the bell to protect the inside when it is not being played. A feather is used to clean the mouthhole when the playing is interrupted. ...

Article

Bi  

K.A. Gourlay

[bin]

Root term in the Benue-Congo language group for double-headed cylindrical drums found in the Jos Plateau and adjoining areas of Nigeria. The term bi is used by the Jaba people, bin by the Katav, Kagoro, Morwa, and Pyem, biyin by the Kaje, bing by the Birom, and ibin and ingonbin by the Jarawa people. In the Ada-mawa language group to the east the ‘b’ becomes ‘v’; hence the Waka vi, Kumba and Teme vim, Yendang vin, and Kugama and Gengle avim. All drums are of the ganga type, with cord and lace bracing, though not all have snares. The most common use is in pairs of larger and smaller drums, for example the Kagoro badang bin (‘large drum’) and shishio bin (‘small drum’), which are played as a rhythmic accompaniment to horn or flute ensembles for singing and dancing. An exception is the bi of the Irigwe of the Jos Plateau, a tall, open, single-headed drum, played standing with hands or sticks, and used as the solo instrument for paeans of praise for traditional warriors and slayers of wild animals....

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Article

Bili  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Double-headed drum of the Logo people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The wooden body is tall and slightly conical. The antelope-skin heads are tied together with leather thongs and beaten with sticks. It is played with other drums, but never with the larimva.

G. Knosp: Enquête sur la vie musicale au Congo belge...

Article

Bilil  

Monique Brandily

End-blown idioglot clarinet of northern Chad. The tube is made from reed, and the number of fingerholes varies according to the area—four in Tibesti and five or six in Kanem. The length varies between 20 and 25 cm. The reed is cut in the side of the tube close to the top. The instrument takes its name from a piece of repertory of the double clarinet ...

Article

Bilim  

Double-headed cylindrical drum with laced heads, of the Mundang people of Chad. The drum is placed on the ground and each head is beaten by one hand of the drummer. The drum has been recorded providing rhythmic accompaniment with an end-blown trumpet and gourd vessel rattle for a women’s dance at the funeral ceremony of a woman healer....

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Bimbi  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

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Binga  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

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Article

Bisanji  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

[tshisaandji]

Lamellaphone of the Luluwa people of the south-western Democratic Republic of the Congo. The resonator, usually rectangular, can be made of hard wood with a variable number of metal tongues or of very soft wood with bamboo tongues.

F.J. de Hen: Beitrag zur Kenntnis der Musikinstrumente aus Belgisch Kongo und Ruanda-Urundi...

Article

Bizitu  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Set of whistles of the Mbanja people of the north-western Democratic Republic of the Congo. The whistles are made of wood in different sizes and shapes, though all have a conical bore and are threaded on a cord or wire and worn around the neck or wrist. Other names are ...

Article

Bogongo  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Obscure three-string harp-zither of the Binga of the Central African Republic. It probably resembles the mvet, a stick with a notched bridge in the middle but no added resonator. It is played resting on the thighs of a performer seated on the ground, to accompany hunting and other songs.

See also...

Article

Bokenza  

K.A. Gourlay

[bonkenza, bonkenja, bonkendja]

Cylindro-conical double-headed drum of the Konda and Nkundo peoples of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The Konda drum is about 58 cm tall and the Nkundo about 44 cm. The cone is narrow and elongated, giving a goblet-shaped appearance without a supporting base, and the upper head is fastened by parallel cords which, at the point where the cylinder gives way to the cone, take the form of a net covering the cone. Traditionally the bokenza was a war drum, beaten in battle to encourage the warriors. The drums have leather carrying straps and often contained small rattling pebbles. The Lia lokiru (116 cm) (cf. Nkundo lokiro and Sengele lokilo) was of the same type and served the same function. The Nkundo term for a large drum (140 cm) of this type, bondundu, would appear to be cognate with the Yembe and Konda ndungu and the Dia and Sakata ...

Article

Bokio  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

[bonkeli]

Single-headed drum of the Kota and Kutu peoples of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The footed wooden body is about 80 cm tall. The head can be of antelope, snake, or crocodile skin, usually laced to the body with leather thongs. It is beaten by the hands.

O. Boone...

Article

Bokuka  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Trapezoidal slit drum of the Mongo, Nkundo, and Kota peoples of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is made of wood and averages about 50 to 70 cm tall and 75 to 90 cm long. It is wider at the bottom than at the top. Larger examples have been reported. The Mongo also call it ...

Article

Bol  

Timkehet Teffera

Flute of the Berta people of western Ethiopia and southern Sudan. It is an end-blown one-note bamboo pipe without fingerholes. 12 to 25 bols of different pitches are played in hocket in ensemble (called bol negero and variant names) with a wooden kettledrum (negero) struck with two wooden beaters. During the 19th century this ensemble was a status symbol of the royal court. The instruments were kept in the royal palace and used only at private and official events of the court. Each bol had its own name: al meshir al awel, al meshir atani, tego bala, aqidare, amadine, asholfa, bolmoshan, etc.; nowadays the names differ according to locale and dialect. The pipes are made in sets from 9 to 80 cm long and 2 to 5 cm in diameter, with a sharpened blowing edge and slightly conical tube stopped at the bottom by a natural node. The ...

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Bolange  

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Bolima  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

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Bolo