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Article

Stanley Boorman

(fl 1600–30). Italian printer, bookseller and publisher. He came from a family of scholars, artists and publishers in Milan. (Giovanni Paolo Lomazzo had sponsored the publication of treatises by Gaffurius and Bonaventura da Brescia in the years 1492–1500.) He entered into partnership with the Tini family in 1603 and until 1612 they produced much music, primarily the work of local composers. From 1613 to 1630 Lomazzo worked on his own; a number of his publications appeared from the presses of other printers. He appears to have been musically literate, for he selected the contents of some of his numerous anthologies himself: they include sacred and secular music by many composers, including Ghizzolo, G.S.P. de' Negri, Orfeo Vecchi, Gastoldi and Riccardo Rognoni. He also published treatises by Scaletta and Rognoni.

His son Francesco Lomazzo was also a printer. He published about a dozen books between 1603 and 1619...

Article

Miriam Miller

revised by Andrew R. Walkling

(d ?London, 1630). English bookseller and printer. He was apprenticed to William Lownes (a relative) from 1580 to 1587, and began printing books in 1592. In 1604 he married (as his second wife) the widow of Peter Short, and thus inherited Short’s shop ‘The Star’ on Bread Street Hill, London, as well as his publication rights and music type. From then until 1613 he published several musical works, most of which were reprintings of Short’s copyrights (e.g. John Dowland’s The First Booke of Songes or Ayres in 1606 and 1613, and Thomas Morley’s A Plaine and Easie Introduction to Practicall Musicke in 1608) but which also included a reissue of both books of William Byrd’s Gradualia (1610), formerly printed by Thomas East. He is thought to have been the brother of Matthew Lownes, and when the latter acquired a share in the privilege of William Barley...

Article

Miriam Miller and Andrew R. Walkling

(d ?London, 1625). English bookseller. Presumed to be a younger brother of Humfrey Lownes, with whom he was associated in several offices and commercial ventures throughout his life. He was apprenticed to Nicholas Ling from 1582 to 1591, and began publishing books in 1596 in St Dunstan’s Churchyard, Fleet Street. He moved to ‘The Bishop’s Head’ in St Paul’s Churchyard about 1605. In 1611, along with the bookseller John Browne and the printer Thomas Snodham, he acquired the rights to the music publications of Thomas East, which the three men began issuing as assignees under the music-publishing patent held by William Barley. When Barley died in 1613 or 1614, they assumed Barley’s patent, although there is no record of any formal transfer, or indeed of any effort to renew the patent when it expired in 1619. There is no evidence that Lownes was himself a music printer. He was succeeded on his death by his son-in-law George Latham, who continued publishing music....

Article

Magni  

Stanley Boorman

Italian family of printers and musicians , active in the 17th century. Bartolomeo Magni came from a family of musicians from Ravenna. Of his brothers, Benedetto Magni was a composer and organist and Giovanni was organist at S Maria in Porto, Rome. Bartolomeo was apprenticed to Angelo Gardano and married his daughter. On Gardano’s death in 1611 the estate passed to his daughter and Magni printed as the ‘heir of Angelo Gardano’. For much of his output he retained the Gardane title, presumably for commercial reasons, though he added his own in one of several formulae, such as ‘Stampa del Gardano appresso Bartolomeo Magni’. He was a prolific printer, and although there were others in north Italy, he did not have to face the competition of Scotto, whose heirs had stopped printing a few years before. As a result he printed music by most of the important composers of the period to ...

Article

Stanley Boorman

( d 1633). French printer . His father was probably Simon Mangeant (d between 1583 and 1593), who printed only two volumes with music: one of the many editions of Marot and Bèze’s psalms published in 1562, and Cantiques spirituels, printed for Estienne Martin in 1565. Jacques Mangeant printed from 1593 to 1633 in Caen. In 1593 he printed the airs of Guillaume de Chastillon, who had obtained a privilege in 1590, and in 1611 a further volume following Chastillon’s death. The only other music to come from Mangeant’s press was a small group of anthologies of airs and chansons à dancer (RISM 16087, 16088, 16089, 16158, 16159, 1615 10). His son Eleazar Mangeant does not appear to have printed any music.

G. Lepreux: Gallia typographica (Paris, 1912), 484 P. Pidoux: Le psautier huguenot du XVIe siècle, ii: Documents et bibliographie (Basle, 1962)...

Article

Stanley Boorman

Italian family of music printers . They were active at Rome from about 1620 to at least 1719. The biography of the family is difficult to unravel, partly because many editions carry the impress ‘Il Mascardi’ or merely ‘Mascardi’. At least three members were involved: Giacomo Mascardi, who ceased printing in 1640; Vitale Mascardi (bc 1594; d 10 April 1666), who succeeded him and printed until 1666; and Giovanni Mascardi, who appears to have printed between 1667 and 1675, after which most editions carry the inscription ‘successor to the Mascardi’, or ‘Il Mascardi’. Vitale Mascardi seems to have been the first to print music, beginning in 1650 with editions by leading Roman composers, Foggia, Graziani and Sabbatini among them. He printed much music between 1650 and 1654, including a number of volumes of villanellas and several of music by Valentini. A number of his books were edited by Floridus de Silvestris. Giovanni printed little music (although he produced several volumes devoted to Graziani), and his successors averaged no more than one or two books of music a year. At this time the firm had a successful collaboration with the promoter G.B. Caifabri: he had employed a number of printers, but from ...

Article

Henri Vanhulst

(b Harderwijk, 1613/14; d Amsterdam, bur. Dec 5, 1684). Dutch bookseller, printer and publisher . His shop ‘in’t Musyckboeck’ was in the Stoof-Steegh, Amsterdam, and his business (not exclusively musical) began in 1640; his heirs, Alida and Maria Matthysz, continued it from 1681 to about 1720. He printed several editions for booksellers in Amsterdam (E. Cloppenburch, J. Jansz, Ludwig Elzevier etc.) and brought out others on his own account, including reissues. He sometimes accompanied the text with a Dutch translation or replaced it with an original Dutch text, as in Gastoldi’s Balletten … met drie stemmen: ende nu verrijckt met de vierde partije … ende op gheestelijcke gesangen gheset (1641). Matthysz also published compositions and treatises by local composers, including Ban, Jacobus Haffner, Joseph Butler, Van Eyck, G.Q. van Blankenburg and Carolus Hacquardt. Among his most important publications are collections of instrumental pieces, 20 Koninklijcke fantasien...

Article

Anne Schnoebelen

[ Giuseppe ]

( fl 1683–92). Italian music publisher . He was active in Bologna, keeping his printing establishment on the Pavaglione. He published sacred music by Cazzati (op.19, 1687), Cavanni (op.1, 1689) and Albergati (op.7, 1691), chamber cantatas by G.F. Tosi (op.2, 1688) and instrumental music by G.B. Degli Antoni (opp.1 and 3–6, 1687–90), Giuseppe Torelli (opp.1–3 and 5, 1686–92), Gaspardini (op.1, 1683), Clemente Monari (op.1, 1686), C.A. Mazzolini (op.1, 1687), G.B. Berri (op.1, 1688), Elia Vannini (op.1, 1691) and F.C. Belisi (op.1, 1691). Micheletti’s publications are characterized by neatness and elegance; his typographical mark is an angel with a cornucopia filled with flowers, a crown or a noble coat-of-arms.

MischiatiI SartoriD F. Vatielli: ‘Editori musicali dei secoli XVII e XVIII’, Arte e vita musicale a Bologna (Bologna, 1927/R), 239–56 L. Gottardi: La stampa musicale in Bologna dagli inizi fino al 1700...

Article

Anne Schnoebelen

( fl Bologna, 1632–89). Italian music publisher , father of Pier Maria Monti . He began his publishing activities in Bologna in 1632, establishing a printing press near the church of S Matteo delle Pescherie. Two years later he entered into partnership with Carlo Zenero, and the press was moved to Via S Mamolo in 1638. Its first musical publication was Corbetta’s Scherzi armonici: suonate sopra la chitarra spagnola (1639), followed in the same year by the second volume of Piccinini’s Intavolatura di liuto. Shortly thereafter the partnership was dissolved, and Monti continued the business alone, publishing mostly historical and sacred works. In 1662 he resumed his musical activities, having moved to a shop under the vault of the Pollaroli, and until 1689 his musical production was intense, consisting chiefly of works by Bolognese composers. He seems to have worked completely independently at first. During this period his typographical mark was a figure of St Petronius, the patron saint of Bologna....

Article

Anne Schnoebelen

( fl Bologna, 1689–1702). Italian music publisher , son of Giacomo Monti . He succeeded his father in 1689, taking over a well-established printing house that had been active in Bolognese music publishing since 1639. Like his father’s, his publications were sold by Marino Silvani, and later also by Lelio Della Volpe. The composers whose works were published by the Monti firm during these years (mostly between 1690 and 1695) included Giovanni Bononcini, Domenico Gabrielli, Corelli, G.P. Colonna, Elia Vannini, Jacchini, G.B. Bassani and Francesco Passarini. Monti’s last musical edition seems to have been a reprint of Trolli’s Modo facile di suonare il Sistro nomato il Timpano (1702, printed under the name Paradossi). After his death his heirs continued the non-musical part of the firm’s publishing activities, becoming the official printers for the Holy Office; the music publishing was taken over by the Silvani firm. In general the typography of the Monti press (both father and son) lacks care and elegance and has a commercial character....

Article

Article

(fl 1607–41). Italian bookseller and printer, active in Florence . He matriculated in the Arte dei medici e speziali on 15 November 1607 and by 1614 had become head of the printing firm founded by Giorgio Marescotti and continued by his son Cristofano. He was also a singer trained in the choir of Florence Cathedral. Pignoni made an auspicious entry into music printing in 1614–15 with no fewer than six editions, including masses and motets by Marco da Gagliano, madrigals by Giovanni del Turco, and Giulio Caccini’s Nuove musiche e nuova maniera di scriverle. This initiative was prompted by a generous, if shortlived, financial investment in the firm (in June 1614) by three prominent Florentine patrons, Giovanni del Turco, Lodovico Arrighetti and (for Cosimo del Sera) Giovanni Battista da Gagliano: hence the imprint ‘Zanobi Pignoni, e Compagni’.

Thereafter Pignoni diversified his interests, printing poetry, occasional items and descrizioni...

Article

Anne Schnoebelen

( fl Bologna, 1660–62). Italian publisher . He was the son of Antonio Pisarri (d 1650), who founded the family publishing firm in the early 1600s. Alessandro was the first to publish music, issuing ten volumes of compositions by Maurizio Cazzati between 1660 and 1662 (opp.21–30). After his death, the firm continued under the direction of the Pisarri heirs, publishing in ...

Article

Margaret Dean-Smith

revised by Nicholas Temperley

English family of music publishers and booksellers.

(b Norwich, 1623; d London, between Dec 24, 1686 and Feb 7, 1687). Publisher, bookseller, and vicar-choral of St Paul’s Cathedral. During the period 1651–84 he dominated the music publishing trade (then virtually confined to London) in a business to which his son (2) Henry Playford succeeded. For the printing of his books he engaged the services of Thomas Harper (successor to Thomas Snodham, who had inherited the business of Thomas East), William Godbid (successor to Harper) and his own nephew (3) John Playford the younger, who, apprenticed to Godbid, entered into business in 1679 with the latter’s widow Anne. The format, style and printing of Playford’s books, together with evidence from the stationers’ registers, suggest with some certainty that they were printed with East’s types, although for title-pages, other than those engraved, a less florid style than the earlier borders was preferred. In many instances Playford adopted East’s device and its surrounding motto, ‘Laetificat cor musica’...

Article

Colin Timms

( b Samarugio, Rome, c 1580; d Rome, March 10, 1673). Italian music publisher and book dealer . Described in documents of the period as a ‘cartulario’ and ‘librarius’, he built up his publishing concern from a bookdealer’s business that he had probably founded himself. It was situated in central Rome (Parione), and his sign, which appears in his publications, was a hammer. Following his marriage in 1607 he had at least four children of whom one, Giovanni (b 17 July 1612; d 30 Sept 1675), followed his father’s occupation. Both father and son were buried at S Maria in Vallicella (the Chiesa Nuova) in Rome.

Antonio Poggioli published most types of instrumental and sacred and secular vocal music, including reprints of Arcadelt, Lupacchino and Tasso, a complete edition of Cifra’s motets and important anthologies of motets. His publications date from 1620 to 1668 and represent the work of seven Roman printers, among them Robletti, Masotti, Grignani and Mascardi. Giovanni Poggioli is known only as the editor of the later of the two, slightly different, editions of the ...

Article

Flemish family of printers. They managed the Leiden branch of the publishing house founded by Christoffel Plantin. Frans (b Lille, 17 February 1539; d Leiden, July 1597) managed the firm from 1585 until his death; his sons Christophe (d 1600) and Frans (d 1643) then took over the business, which continued until ...

Article

Stanley Boorman

(fl Venice, early 17th century). Italian music printer. His father Constantin Raverii was a member of a minor printing family and married one of the Bindoni family, famous as Venetian printers though little associated with music. Through them he became related to the Gardane family. Alessandro Raverii printed music only between 1606 and 1609, during which time he printed a large number of volumes of which over 50 are extant. He appears to have had close ties with Angelo Gardano, for many of Raverii’s titles are clearly no more than reprints of volumes from Gardano’s house after 1588. Raverii also printed three titles (by Severo Bonini, Giulio Caccini and Jacopo Peri) which he seems to have taken from Giorgio Marescotti in Florence.

SartoriDC. Sartori: ‘“Una dinastia di editori musicali”: documenti inediti sui Gardano e loro congiunti Stefano Bindoni e Alessandro Raveri’, La bibliofilia, 57 (1956), 176–208L.E. Bartholomew...

Article

Teresa Chylińska

[Jerzy]

(b Stettin [now Szczecin], Jan 16, 1600; d Stettin, 5 June ?1645). German printer. He came from a family of printers living in Stettin; in 1619 he purchased Georg Rhode’s printing house, the most eminent in Danzig (now Gdańsk), and in 1629 he was appointed ‘Reipublicae et gymnasii typographus’. After his death the firm was run by his widow and then by his sons until the end of the 17th century. His music publications included volumes by Eccard and Stobaeus (RISM 1634³), Opitz (1639), Stobaeus (1640), Siefert (1640) and Martin Spielenberger (1641). He used a high quality of type and his publications present an attractive appearance.

M. Przywecka-Samecka: Drukarstwo muzyczne w Polsce do końca XVIII wieku [Music printing in Poland up to the end of the 18th century] (Kraków, 1969, 2/1987)I. Treichel, ed.: Słownik pracowników książki polskiej [Dictionary of the Polish book trade] (Warsaw, 1972)...

Article

Stefano Ajani

(fl Rome, 1609–50). Italian printer. He usually published at his own expense at a time when printers were frequently financed either by a bookseller or the author or composer. However, he did occasionally print ‘at the author’s request’ (e.g. Puliaschi’s La gemma musicale, RISM 1618¹³) or on behalf of booksellers, among them Antonio Poggioli (books 1, 4, 5 and 6 of Rontani’s Varie musiche, 1620–23) and G.D. Franzini (Florido de Silvestri’s Florida verba of 1648¹). Like other publishers of the time he brought out several anthologies of music he chose himself: two of sacred music (Lilia campis, 1621³, and Litanie, 1622¹, both for voices and organ) and three of secular music (Giardino musicale, 162115, Vezzosetti fiori, 1622¹¹, and Le risonanti sfere, 16299). He also published non-musical works.

Robletti’s publications are accurate and clear, if not particularly elegant. A list of those extant shows that he catered for a wide range of styles and interests. He included many famous and lesser-known names in his output: G.F. Anerio (at least 16 volumes, ...

Article

Samuel F. Pogue

revised by Rudolf A. Rasch

(b Caen, 1665/6; d Amsterdam, July 7, 1722). French music printer, active in the Netherlands. He and his family, as Protestants, left Normandy after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685 and moved to Amsterdam where Estienne Roger registered as a member of the Walloon church in February 1686. He soon went into the printing trade, apprenticed successively between 1691 and 1695 to Antoine Pointel and Jean-Louis de Lorme. On 11 August 1691, listed in the records as ‘marchand’, he married Marie-Suzanne de Magneville (c1670–1712). On 7 November 1695 he was on the rolls of the association of booksellers, printers and binders. During 1696 he published in association with his former master, de Lorme, but by the following year he was publishing music and other books (including histories, grammars and a dictionary of antiquities) under his own name.

Roger had two daughters. He designated the younger, Jeanne (...