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Article

[La Vigne, Nicolas Martin de]

(b Chalon-sur-Saône, ?c1645; d after 1702). Dutch composer, guitarist and music publisher of French extraction. In 1667 he became a citizen of Amsterdam under the name Nicolas Martin de la Vigne, dit Des Rosiers. He must have remained in Amsterdam until about 1700. He married Anne Pointel, whose brother Antoine was also a musician and music publisher in Amsterdam. The two men cooperated, mainly, it seems, during the years 1687–91. Derosiers apparently took care of the printing (using a special fount with round note heads invented by Derosiers) and Pointel handled the selling; Pointel’s shop was styled ‘Au Rosier’, a pun on Derosiers’s name. They published mainly vocal and instrumental selections from Lully’s operas and works by Derosiers himself, but many of their publications have not survived. In 1692 they sold their stock to Victor Amadée de Chevalier; later (possibly in 1698) it came into the hands of Estienne Roger....

Article

Paolo Emilio Carapezza

revised by Giuseppe Collisani

[De Michaele, Antoninus]

(b Tusa, Sicily; d Tusa, 1680). Italian guitarist and music editor. He was a priest. His only known publication is La nuova chitarra, di regole, dichiarationi e figure, con la regola della scala … con l’aggiunta d’arie siciliane, e sonate di vari autori (Palermo, 1680, 2/1698), a collection of dances and Sicilian songs for five-string guitar in Italian tablature. The music is preceded by rules for tuning the guitar and for obtaining five-note chords; each of 24 triads is indicated by a letter of the alphabet. The texts of the Sicilian songs are given below the letters of the tablature; appropriate numbers indicate the string in each chord that plays in unison with the voice, allowing the basic melody to be reconstructed. Rhythmic indications are added to the dances, ‘included for those who know how the tune should be sung’, to provide an accompaniment for familiar melodies. Di Micheli claimed to have taken the songs from other publications, where the vocal line was fully notated, in particular from works, now lost, by Mario Albioso, Silvestro Orlando and Pietro Renda....

Article

Jerome Roche

[Johannes]

(b Veringenstadt, nr Sigmaringen, 1585; d Rottenburg am Neckar, 1654). German music editor, singer, teacher and composer. He studied at the University of Dillingen, one of the main cultural centres of south-west Germany, and in 1610 took a post as singer at St Martin, Rottenburg. This carried with it duties as a schoolteacher: in this capacity he became Rektor of the school in 1622 and in his musical capacity Kapellmeister of the church in 1627.

Donfrid is chiefly interesting as an editor who saw it as his task to propagate in Catholic southern Germany the best and most popular church music by Italian composers of his day. To this end he published five large anthologies at Strasbourg in the 1620s: the tripartite Promptuarii musici, consisting of motets arranged in a liturgical cycle, as had been done by other editors, such as Schadaeus, before him; the Viridarium, devoted to Marian pieces; and the ...

Article

Paul Oliver

[Georgia Tom ]

(b Villa Rica, GA, July 1, 1899; d Chicago, IL, Jan 23, 1993). American blues singer, gospel songwriter, pianist, and publisher. The son of an African American revivalist preacher, he moved in 1910 to Atlanta, where he came under the influence of local blues pianists. He left for Chicago during World War I and studied at the Chicago College of Composition and Arranging, also becoming an agent for Paramount records. Dorsey’s compositions at the time included “Riverside Blues” (recorded by King Oliver’s Creole Jazz Band, 1923, Para.). His skill as a pianist, composer, and arranger gained him a job with Les Hite’s Whispering Serenaders in 1923, and soon afterwards he formed his own Wildcats Jazz Band, with which Ma Rainey performed. As “Georgia Tom” he made several recordings with her, usually including the slide guitarist Tampa Red (Hudson Whittaker). In the late 1920s Dorsey formed a duo with Tampa Red; their blues recording “Tight like that” (...

Article

Diana Poulton

revised by Robert Spencer

(b ?London, c1591; d London, Nov 28, 1641). English anthologist, composer and lutenist, son of John Dowland. From the dedicatory letter to Sir Robert Sidney in A Musicall Banquet (RISM 161020) we learn that Sir Robert was Dowland's godfather. According to the dedication of his Varietie of Lute-Lessons (1610²³), to Sir Thomas Mounson, he received part of his education in Mounson's household while his father was abroad. Between May 1612 and January 1616 Robert was employed by William Cavendish, Earl of Devonshire. In February 1613 he was still in England; his name appears among the lute players who were engaged to play in Chapman's Masque of the Inner Temple and Lincoln's Inn, given at Whitehall as part of the marriage celebrations of Princess Elizabeth and Frederick, Elector Palatine. At some time in the early 1620s he was travelling on the Continent with a group of English actors who sought permission on ...

Article

Frances Barulich

(b Antwerp, Belgium, Nov 23, 1897; d Philadelphia, PA, June 12, 1980). Music publisher and conductor of Belgian birth. He was trained at the Antwerp and Amsterdam conservatories and played violin in the Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam before coming to the United States in 1920. He joined the Philadelphia Orchestra as a viola player and was appointed chorus master and assistant conductor of the Philadelphia Grand Opera Company in 1927. In 1926 he opened a music shop in Philadelphia and two years later was joined by Adolph Vogel (a cellist in the Philadelphia Orchestra) in the establishment of the music publishing firm Elkan–vogel . Elkan became first conductor of the Trenton Civic Orchestra in 1933 and conductor and music director of the Philadelphia Ballet Company in 1935; he founded the Dra-Mu Opera Company in 1945. He left Elkan-Vogel in 1952 but opened his own publishing house, Henri Elkan Music Publisher, Inc., in ...

Article

Robert M. Copeland

revised by Dale Cockrell

(b Parsonfield, ME, Aug 3, 1820; d Hyde Park, MA, Sept 29, 1915). American composer, editor, music educator, and conductor. He attended Parsonfield Academy and Effingham Union Academy (NH) as a boy, then matriculated at Dracut Academy (MA), intending to become a physician. His father, a prosperous farmer, had taught him to play the cello, and that sparked an abiding interest in music. He moved to the Boston area in 1841, where he attended singing schools under Benjamin F. Baker and George F. Root. In 1844 he began more formal musical training with Isaac B. Woodbury in Boston, studying voice, piano, organ, and music theory. Emerson moved to Salem, Massachusetts, afterwards, where he taught music privately, was involved in local school matters, and directed a choir. He was later the organist and music director at Bullfinch Street Church, Boston, for four years, then at Second Congregational Church, Greenfield, MA for eight years, while teaching concurrently at Powers’ Institute in Bernardstown. By the 1870s he was devoting himself full time to editing, composing, compiling, and conducting (some 350 festivals and musical conventions); he also sang and was known widely as a lecturer....

Article

Richard Crawford

revised by David W. Music

(b Woburn, MA, May 28, 1737; d ?Boston, Dec 30, 1794). American conductor, bandmaster, engraver and tune-book compiler. He became an important figure in the musical life of Boston during the decade beginning in 1764, and was active in both sacred and secular music-making. He organized and performed in at least six concerts in Boston between 1769 and 1773, and also claimed to have founded and trained a regimental band in the city. No music-making by Flagg has been traced after 1773.

Flagg’s two sacred tune books are devoted to the compositions of English psalmodists. A Collection of the Best Psalm Tunes (Boston, 1764), engraved by Paul Revere, was the largest collection of sacred music published in America to that time and the first to be printed on American-made paper. Sixteen Anthems (Boston, n.d. [1766]), intended not for beginners but for ‘those who have made some proficiency in the art of singing’, was engraved and printed by Flagg himself, and he may also have been the engraver of Billings’s ...

Article

Ivana Vesić

(b Plzeň, Sept 29, 1882; d Iriški Venac, March 27, 1938). Yugoslav music publisher, conductor, composer, violinist of Czech origin. After working as a freelance musician in Sofia, Bulgaria (1897–1903), he settled in Belgrade in 1903 where he took the post of concertmaster in the National Theater (1904–09) and temporarily in the Orchestra of ‘Kraljeva garda’ [King’s guards]. He was also the conductor and director of several singing societies (‘Lira’ [Lyre], ‘Harmonija’ [Harmony], etc.) as well as of his own salon orchestra which performed regularly in the hotel ‘Moskva’ [Moscow] (1908–14). He was a founder and owner of the publishing house ‘Edition Frajt’, (1921–41), which was dedicated solely to music publishing. It released more than 800 volumes consisting mostly of the works of Austrian, Yugoslav, German, Russian, Czech, and Hungarian composers. The largest part of the collection comprised arias from operettas and operas, arrangements of folk songs and folk dances, salon lyrical character pieces, and popular songs and dances. In addition to the works of established Serbian composers from the 19th century (Davorin Jenko, Stevan Mokranjac, Josip Marinković), Frajt`s catalogue included the works of many Yugoslav composers of his time (Petar Krstić, Stevan Hristić, Mihovil Logar, Marko Tajčević, etc.). Among them were the numerous popular songs based mostly on the rhythm of popular social dances of that period and arrangements of folk songs and dances composed by Frajt himself. Frajt was also the author of several pieces for orchestra (‘Srpska igra’ br. 1 i 2 [Serbian dance no.1 and 2]), vocal-instrumental ensemble (‘Misa u B-duru’ [Mass in B Major]), solo songs, and works for violin solo and violin and piano....

Article

Horace Clarence Boyer

(b Fayette, MS, Sept 10, 1899; d Chicago, IL, Aug 26, 1963). American gospel pianist, composer, and publisher. He sang in local choirs before settling in Chicago in 1927. There he joined the Ebenezer Baptist Church and became co-director of its junior choir with Thomas A. Dorsey. With Dorsey he organized in 1931 the first known black gospel chorus. In 1932, with Dorsey, Sallie Martin, and Magnolia Lewis Butts, he formed the National Convention of Gospel Choirs and Choruses, and the same year he and Roberta Martin, pianist for his junior choir, founded the Martin–Frye Quartet (renamed the Roberta Martin Singers in 1935). In the late 1940s Frye began an association with Mahalia Jackson, and it was for her that he surreptitiously secured the song “Move on up a little higher”; her recording in 1947 was a great success, selling over a million copies. Frye later published this composition as his own (he opened a publishing house in the early 1950s), without crediting its rightful composer, William Herbert Brewster. He did, however, compose several well-known gospel songs, including “I am sending my timber up to heaven” (...

Article

Robert Pascall

(b Frauental, Styria, May 5, 1842; d Vöslau, nr Vienna, Oct 5, 1899). Austrian conductor, teacher, editor and composer, brother of Robert Fuchs. He studied theory with Simon Sechter in Vienna and was appointed Kapellmeister of the Bratislava Opera in 1864. He then worked as an opera conductor in Brno (where his only opera, Zingara, was first produced in 1872), Kassel, Cologne, Hamburg, Leipzig and finally, from 1880, at the Vienna Hofoper. In 1873 he married the singer Anthonie Exner in Kassel. Fuchs became a professor of composition at the Vienna Conservatory in 1888 and succeeded Hellmesberger as its director in 1893; the next year he received the title of assistant Hofkapellmeister for his work at the court opera. He played an important part in preparing the Schubert Gesamtausgabe, editing the dramatic works and some of the orchestral music. He also edited operas by Handel, Gluck and Mozart and wrote songs and piano pieces....

Article

Wolfgang Boetticher

(bap. Nuremberg, Sept 2, 1574; d Nuremberg, Dec 1616). German publisher, bookseller, engraver, editor and lutenist. According to the foreword of his Testudo gallo-germanica Fuhrmann attended ‘German and French high schools and universities’; there are records of him studying in Jena (1597), Marburg (1599), Tübingen (1601) and Basel (1604), where he received a broad education. He then worked in Nuremberg, where in 1608 he took over the typographical workshop of his father, Valentin, who had published mathematical and theological works and was also known for publishing music and theoretical works. Composers whose music was published by Fuhrmann include Melchior Franck, J.A. Herbst and Demantius.

For musicians Fuhrmann is of particular interest for his anthology of lute music Testudo gallo-germanica, hoc est: novae et nunquam antehac editae recreationes musicae, ad testudinis asum et tabulaturam (RISM 161524/R1975, published in Nuremberg). It comprises 180 pages and includes a German translation of Anthoine Francisque’s ...

Article

Darlene Graves and Michael Graves

[William J. ]

(b Alexandria, IN, March 28, 1936). American gospel songwriter, performer, producer, and publisher. He grew up on a small farm in Indiana and graduated from Anderson College with a major in English and a minor in music. He went on to receive a master’s degree in guidance and counseling and met his future wife and song-producing partner, Gloria Sickal, while both were teaching high school. Gaither started singing gospel music as a child and in 1956 formed the Bill Gaither Trio with his brother Danny and his sister Mary Ann. He started his own publishing company in 1959. He continued to perform and compose while a teacher at Alexandria High School and in 1961 formed the Gaither Music Company to publish his works. After their marriage in 1962, Gaither and his wife wrote their first major song, “He touched me,” which was a significant hit by 1963. He re-formed the Bill Gaither Trio with Gloria and Danny, and in ...

Article

Howard Mayer Brown

revised by Lynda Sayce

(b Nuremberg, c1500; d Nuremberg, 1570). German instrumentalist, lute maker and compiler and arranger of several volumes of instrumental music. He was probably the son of Conrad Gerle (d 1521), a well-known lute maker in Nuremberg. He may be presumed to have spent his life in his native city. He may have been related to Georg Gerle who worked as an instrument maker in Innsbruck during the second half of the 16th century.

Hieronymus Formschneider of Nuremberg published three volumes of music by Hans Gerle: Musica teusch, auf die Instrument der grossen unnd kleinen Geygen, auch Lautten (1532), Tabulatur auff die Laudten (1533) and Eyn newes sehr künstlichs Lautenbuch (1552). On the title-page of the last volume the author called himself ‘Hans Gerle den Eltern’ (the elder), implying the existence of a younger relative with the same forename.

The first volume, ...

Article

James R. Hines, Barbara Turchin and Nicholas Michael Butler

(b Hesse-Kassel, Germany, c1786; d New York, NY, July 30, 1829). American theater manager, pianist, organist, composer, and music publisher of German birth. He moved to the United States at the end of the 18th century and was probably related to the musician George Gilfert who was in New York as early at 1789. In his first New York advertisement in 1800, he was described as a musician “lately from Europe.” The New York directory of 1805 lists him as a music teacher in that city, but in 1806 he migrated to Charleston, South Carolina, with a number of other theater musicians. He presented his first concert there on 3 March 1807 and quickly became a favorite member of the local music scene. In December 1809 he became the organist of St. John’s Lutheran Church, and in December 1810 he opened a music store in partnership with a fellow German musician, Philip Muck, under the name C. Gilfert and Company. This institution chiefly sold imported instruments, accessories, and music, but in early ...

Article

(b Chicago, June 21, 1906; d Gstaad, Switzerland, Oct 22, 1997). American double bass player, tuba player, and music publisher, brother of Benny Goodman. Having begun on tuba, he took up double bass at the request of Ben Pollack, whose band he joined in January 1926 on the coat-tails of his exceptionally talented brother Benny. He toured and recorded with Pollack until spring 1934 and then with his brother until April 1939, though he also took part in numerous studio sessions. Goodman stopped playing to concentrate on running a restaurant in New York; by this time he had founded the popular-music publishing company Regent Music in partnership with his younger brother Gene (Eugene) Goodman (b 1910). Harry and Gene later established Jewel Music and, more significantly, ARC Music, the latter in 1953 in collaboration with the record producers Leonard and Phil Chess (not to be confused with the earlier ARC [American Record Corporation]); as the Arc Music Group, it has maintained a powerful presence in the field of blues. Goodman spent his last 25 years in France....

Article

Samuel F. Pogue

revised by Frank Dobbins

(fl Lyons, 1550–84). French music printer, bookseller, composer and instrumentalist. In 1551 he prepared the third in a series of four books of music for guitar printed in Paris by Robert Granjon and Michel Fezandat (RISM 1551²²). In the dedication Gorlier wrote apologetically of the four-course guitar and his reasons for composing for an inferior instrument, saying that he wanted to show that it was as capable as larger instruments of reproducing music in two or three parts. Besides being an ‘excellent joueur’ on the guitar, as cited on the title-page, he evidently played the spinet; in a pamphlet (now lost) concerning Loys Bourgeois’ Droict chemin de musique (1550) Bourgeois called him ‘trougnon d’épinette’ (‘garbage of the spinet’) and complained that he had not been educated in classical languages and mathematics like the singer-composers in Lyons, Layolle Roussel and Jambe de Fer.

Gorlier was granted a privilege for printing music on ...

Article

H.C. Colles

revised by Frank Howes

(b Romsey, Jan 25, 1874; d Bromley, Kent, Feb 15, 1944). English organist, writer on music and editor. He trained as a church musician under Madeley Richardson at Southwark Cathedral, served as organist of St Mary Magdalene, Munster Square, in London and many years later as organist of East Grinstead parish church. From 1931 to 1938 he was organist at Chichester Cathedral. In all his church work he tried to obtain good singing from his congregation as well as his choir; his skill as a trainer was manifest in the annual festival in the Royal Albert Hall of working-girls’ clubs which ran from 1925 to 1933. He wrote a number of books on church and choral music, edited the organ music of Rheinberger and Franck, made transcriptions of Bach for organ and composed a number of organ pieces himself. A popular lecturer and adjudicator, he was a member of the committee of the Church Music Society and of the Archbishop’s Committee on Church Music, and received an honorary doctorate from the Archbishop of Canterbury for his services to English church music. In addition he was for 26 years editor of the ...

Article

Sabine Feisst

(b Vienna, Austria, Nov 15, 1894; d Manhasset, NY, April 26, 1982). Music editor, conductor, and teacher of Austrian birth. After initially studying cello, Greissle attended the University of Vienna where he studied musicology with Guido Adler. In 1920 he became a private student of arnold Schoenberg and a rehearsal coach in Schoenberg’s Society for Private Musical Performances. In 1921 he married Schoenberg’s oldest daughter Gertrud. As conductor of the Vienna State Opera’s Cantata Society (1924–37) Greissle premiered Schoenberg’s Woodwind Quintet in 1924 and arranged several of his works, including Five Pieces for Orchestra, op.16 for chamber ensemble. After the Anschluss he fled with his family to the United States and settled in New York. There he worked as music editor for G. Schirmer (1938–46) and thereafter for Edward B. Marks. Greissle taught music theory and rehearsal techniques both privately and at Columbia University, the Philadelphia Academy of Music, the 92nd Street Y, and the New School for Social Research....

Article

Noal Cohen

[Grice, George General; Qusim, Basheer]

(b Pensacola, FL, Nov 28, 1925; d Pensacola, FL, March 14, 1983). American jazz saxophonist, flutist, composer, arranger, music publisher, and teacher. Known more as a composer and arranger than as an instrumentalist, he was nonetheless an alto saxophonist out of the Charlie Parker tradition with a lyrical bent and a recognizable style and sound. He studied clarinet initially and after serving in the US Navy (1944–6) attended the Boston Conservatory (to 1952). His first exposure came through an encounter with the saxophonist Stan Getz in Boston who recorded several of Gryce’s compositions. After moving to New York in 1953, Gryce was soon a part of the city’s vibrant milieu, recording with the drummer Max Roach and the pianist Tadd Dameron. Throughout his career, Gryce collaborated with a number of noted trumpet players including Clifford Brown, Art Farmer, Donald Byrd, and Richard Williams. With Byrd, he co-led the Jazz Lab, which made a number of highly regarded recordings in ...