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Article

Nigel Simeone

(b Eichstätt, Feb 23, 1921). German antiquarian dealer, publisher and bibliographer. He founded his antiquarian business at Tutzing near Munich in 1949, issuing a number of catalogues each year. Several of these have become useful works of reference on individual composers, including Brahms, Mozart, Paganini and Schumann, while an innovative series devoted to individual publishers, including Schott, André and Universal Edition, has also been produced. By 1998 the firm had issued over 350 antiquarian catalogues, usually devoted to one of three specialist areas: important manuscripts and letters, first and early editions, and music literature. Through its prolific but scrupulously detailed catalogues, the firm established itself as one of the most important in postwar Europe.

In 1958 Schneider founded a publishing house which has produced some fine facsimiles such as Beethoven's Missa solemnis (Kyrie only) and Brahms's Clarinet Trio. A significant aspect of the firm's activity has been the publication of scholarly series such as the pioneering Musikbibliographische Arbeiten guides to the first editions of composers from Mozart to Messiaen. Other series include Orff-Dokumentation (8 vols.), a catalogue of music in the Hoboken Collection (...

Article

J. Bradford Young

American firm of music publishers . Edward Schuberth began his association with the New York branch of the Leipzig publisher Julius Schuberth in 1858. When the branch closed in 1872, he established his own publishing business in Union Square. His earliest publications were by German and German-trained musicians, and included songs with English and German words, German-American pieces such as Fritz Neumüller’s Campaign March for Grover Cleveland (1884) and a series of European piano pieces edited by William Mason. Schuberth was the first American publisher of Victor Herbert’s music, issuing his first five operettas, the Second Cello Concerto and some orchestral music. In the 1890s the firm published English translations of European operettas by Ludwig Engländer and Ede Poldini, which were popular in New York, as well as those by the American composer De Koven. Schuberth became recognised as one of the major American publishers of serious music.

In ...

Article

Theodor Wohnhaas

(b Steinau an der Strasse; d Frankfurt, cJan 20, 1629). German music dealer and music publisher. In 1602 he and the printer Wolfgang Richter founded a printing and publishing association in Frankfurt which existed until 1615 under the name of Typographia Musica; it was one of the leading German music publishing firms before the Thirty Years War, and concentrated on Catholic church music, also publishing numerous collections of dances and lieder. Stein published, among others, works by Giulio Belli, Finetti, Getzmann, Giovannelli, Pacelli, Jacob Regnart, Jacob Reiner, Melchior Schramm, Thomas Simpson, Lodovico Viadana and Zucchini....

Article

Don Cusic

[Ragsdale, Harold Ray ]

(b Clarkdale, GA, Jan 24, 1939). American singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer, arranger, music publisher, television star, and entrepreneur. Harold Ragsdale began his musical career with a high school band that played R&B songs by the Coasters, Drifters, and other R&B groups. In 1955 the family moved to Atlanta, where publisher Bill Lowery signed him as a songwriter and secured his first recording contract with Capitol Records; Capitol’s Head of A&R, Ken Nelson changed Ragsdale’s name to Ray Stevens. After attending Georgia State University, where he studied music, Stevens had his first success with his recording of “Jeremiah Peabody’s Poly Unsaturated Quick Dissolving Fast Acting Pleasant Tasting Green and Purple Pills” (Mercury, 1961). In 1962 he moved to Nashville, supplementing his own recording career with work as a session musician, arranger, and background vocalist. He garnered a number-one pop hit and his first Grammy with his recording of “Everything is beautiful” (Barnaby, ...

Article

Alexander Weinmann

(b Switzerland, c1715; d Vienna, Jan 4, 1798). Swiss music publisher and art dealer. He established his business in Vienna in the early 1770s, and on 5 April 1775 advertised the arrival of new copper engravings in the Wiener Zeitung. His first dealings in music consisted of imports from England, the Netherlands and Paris, his source for Anton Huberty's publications. In 1781 his own first publications appeared. Initially he was a commission agent for Anton Huberty, who had moved to Vienna and eventually became only an engraver for Torricella, gradually handing over many of his pieces; one of the most important was Geminiani's violin tutor, which Torricella published in a splendid new edition on 16 October 1782. The firm flourished in its early days, but increasing competition from Artaria & Co. culminated in a public auction (12 August 1786), at which most of Torricella's plates were obtained by Artaria. He continued to run his art shop until he died, impoverished....

Article

Marie Cornaz

(b Brussels, 30 Jan 1731; d Brussels, 2 Aug 1794). Flemish bookseller and printer. He was the son-in-law of the Liège printer Jean-François Bassompierre and was established as a bookseller in Brussels by 5 April 1749. From 1764, Vanden Berghen regularly advertised musical compositions sold in his shop in the Brussels journal Gazette des Pays-Bas. On 11 September 1769 he took over the privilege to print librettos for the Théâtre de La Monnaie from Jean-Joseph Boucherie. Recognized as a printer of the lyric repertoire in Brussels, Vanden Berghen’s editions of librettos, which included musical supplements from 1770 to 1773, were of opéras-comiques and comédies mêlées d’ariettes by Baccelli, Dezède, Fridzeri, Grétry, and Martini.

P. Raspé and H. Vanhulst: ‘L’édition musicale’, La musique en Wallonie et à Bruxelles, ed. R. Wangermée and P. Mercier (Brussels, 1980), vol.1, 301–5M. Cornaz: ‘La Monnaie et le commerce des ouvrages lyriques à Bruxelles’, ...

Article

Miriam Miller

(d 1587). English printer, publisher and bookseller of French birth . He was a Huguenot refugee who settled in London (c1562) and worked in London and Edinburgh. He ran a general printing and publishing business, and in 1570 he published an English edition of Lassus's Recueil du mellange. He also printed in 1575 the Cantiones sacrae of Tallis and Byrd (see Printing and publishing of music, fig.), the first work published under the terms of a music-printing monopoly granted to the two composers by Elizabeth I. Neither the quality of the music nor the high standard of the printing stopped the venture from being a failure and Vautrollier printed no more music under this licence, although he printed two psalm books in 1587, which were exempt from the monopoly. His type was almost certainly acquired from the Netherlands, and on his death his partbook fount passed to Thomas East. A street was named after Vautrollier in the Blackfriars district of the City of London....

Article

(d Venice, 1619). Italian bookseller and music printer . He may have been of Spanish origin, since he signed some books ‘Vincenci’ when he started publishing in 1583 and for the next few years, and signed his edition of Guerrero’s Canciones y villanescas espirituales (1589) ‘en la emprenta de Iago Vincentio’; but in 1583 he also used the spelling ‘Vincenzi’, which was his usual form until 1588. Thereafter he used ‘Vincenti’.

Between 1583 and 1586 Vincenti printed, in partnership with Ricciardo Amadino, about 20 books a year, almost all musical editions. Vincenti seems to have been the more assertive partner; he signed several dedications of joint publications while Amadino signed none, and when they began to print separately in 1586, Vincenti kept the joint printer’s mark, a pine-cone. The separation was probably amicable, for they continued to use the same typefaces, type ornaments and decorative initials, and printed jointly a number of books on religion and philosophy (...

Article

Ilona Mona

(b Stockerau, 1791; d after 1860). Hungarian music publisher, seller of books and printed music, and lithographer . He settled in Hungary in his youth as a cellist at the German theatre in Pest, but in 1837 ill-health obliged him to abandon his musical career, and after two years of uncertainty he opened his shop ‘Musical Merchandise’ in Pest. Besides working as a publisher he participated keenly in the musical life of the city, being closely connected with the Pest-Buda Musical Association; as early as 1837 he submitted to it his draft of a pension scheme for artists, which however was ‘temporarily set aside’. The contemporary press criticized him for his anti-Hungarian attitude but mentioned with approval that ‘at the time of the last Polish uprising he showed sympathy and helped the refugees’. His firm published works by the leading Hungarian composers (e.g. Ferenc Erkel’s Hungarian national anthem and opera ...

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith, Peter Ward Jones and David Hunter

(b ?1665 or 1666; d London, March 13, 1736). Music seller, engraver, printer, publisher and instrument seller, probably of Irish extraction. He was established in London by about 1690. On 24 June 1692 he was appointed musical instrument-maker-in-ordinary to William III in succession to John Shaw, whose trade sign of ‘The Golden Harp and Hoboy’ he also adopted; in the same year he married Mary Allen, by whom he had 15 children, of whom only three survived infancy.

In 1695, when he began publishing, Walsh had few rivals in the trade. John Playford was dead, and his son Henry evidently lacked the initiative to maintain the family firm as a flourishing concern. Thomas Cross, while popular for his introduction of the engraved single-sheet song, was concerned more with engraving than publishing. Walsh was quick to take advantage of the situation, and engraved music appeared from his premises on a scale previously unknown in England. In addition to works by English composers he printed much popular continental music (including Corelli’s sonatas) which he often copied from Dutch editions. From about ...

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith, Peter Ward Jones and David Hunter

(b London, Dec 23, 1709; d London, Jan 15, 1766). English music seller, printer, publisher and instrument maker . He probably assumed control of the business of his father, John Walsh (i), in about 1730, when the relationship with the Hare family apparently ceased and the numbering of the firm’s publications started. On 8 May 1731 Walsh succeeded to the appointment of instrument maker to the king. Although John Johnson and other rivals arose, the business continued to prosper and maintained its excellent engraving and paper. Burney characterized Walsh (ii) as ‘purveyor general’. Walsh fully developed the firm's relationship with Handel, publishing almost all his later works and in 1739 being granted a monopoly of his music for 14 years. About half of Walsh's output was of Handel compositions. The firm also sold other publishers' works, and bought up the stock of smaller firms when they ceased trading. Many of Walsh's apprentice engravers later set up on their own, including John Caulfield, Thomas Straight and Thomas Skillern. Walsh, who never married, was elected a governor of the Foundling Hospital in ...

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by Peter Ward Jones

(b 1678; d London, Sept 26, 1763). English bookseller and publisher . He was established in Lincoln's Inn Fields, London, by 1713, when he began to issue editions of classical authors. From the outset he often published in conjunction with Jacob (later Jacob and Richard) Tonson, issuing plays, librettos and miscellaneous works. The introduction of the ballad opera at Lincoln's Inn Fields Theatre gave Watts a brisk trade in the publication of the operas performed there. He issued the first and later editions of The Beggar's Opera (1728), and after this practically the whole of the series of ballad operas (more than 27 altogether) as soon as they were performed. These editions present the airs for the songs, printed from engraved woodblocks, as an appendix, and are especially valuable for giving the old names of the tunes. Another important work is the six-volume The Musical Miscellany (...

Article

(b Lubomierz, Silesia, c1480; d 1546/7). Polish printer, publisher and bookseller . Probably a pupil of Jan Haller he worked in Vienna from 1510 to 1517 and moved to Kraków in 1519. Around 1527 he became ‘royal printer’. He was the first in Poland to use an italic type and the first to print music from movable mensural type in double- and, later, single-impression methods. Among his music publications were treatises, songbooks and numerous anonymous secular and sacred partsongs. After his death Łazarz Andrysowicz (b Stryków; d Kraków, 1577) married Wietor’s widow and took over the firm. He published many works by Polish composers, mostly popular partsongs, psalms and hymns. After his death his son Jan Łazarzowicz Januszowski (b Kroki, 1550; d Kraków, 1613) continued the printing firm. Known for publications of a high standard, he too became ‘royal printer’. In music he widened the firm’s output to include lute tablatures, missals and other service books, as well as treatises and partsongs....

Article

Teresa Chylińska

(b Kraków, 1523; d Kraków, 15–17 June 1605). Polish printer and bookseller active in Kraków. He was probably a pupil of Florian Ungler. For the high standards of his publications (which equal those of Januszowski), Wirzbięta received the title ‘Sacrae Maiestatis Regiae chalcographus’. A Calvinist, he became the principal printer for the Reformation in Poland. He published much music, almost entirely consisting of songbooks in which Protestant solo songs are well represented. In Walenty z Brzozowa's ...