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Article

Owain Edwards

(b Trecastell, Breconshire, Dec 30, 1848; d Aberystwyth, Dec 10, 1915). Welsh composer, conductor and editor. He was apprenticed to a tailor but showed early determination to become a musician, and taught himself Tonic Sol-fa. In 1874 he was one of Joseph Parry's first music students at the newly founded University College of Wales, Aberystwyth, and four years later, as the college could not yet award degrees, took the Cambridge MusB externally. He was appointed instructor in music at Aberystwyth in 1882, lecturer in 1899 and professor in 1910. A prolific composer, he published most of his music himself, including some fine hymn tunes (‘Penlan’, ‘Builth’, ‘Gnoll Avenue’, ‘Bod Alwyn’). Of his larger works Job, The Storm, Arch y Cyfamod (composed for the National Eisteddfod, Caernarvon, 1876), The Psalm of Life (Cardiff Triennial Festival, 1895), The Galley Slave and Scenes in the Life of Moses (his last big work, dated ...

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John H. Baron

(b Kraków, c1798; d Paris, Aug 10, 1860). American pianist, composer and publisher of Polish birth. He was in New Orleans by 1818, when he is recorded as taking part in a concert; he frequently played the piano, as soloist and accompanist, until 1830. He is credited with the first performance in the USA of a piano concerto by Beethoven, in 1819. In 1824 he composed A Warlike Symphony, Grand Military March, and a comic opera, The Military Stay, all now lost. He became a music dealer in 1826 and opened his own store in New Orleans in 1830, but sold it in 1846 to W.T. Mayo (who sold it in turn in 1854 to P.P. Werlein). In the early 1830s Johns published jointly with Pleyel in Paris his Album louisianais, an elegant collection of songs and piano pieces, the first music known to have been written and published in New Orleans. A few pieces of sheet music also survive. He went to Paris in ...

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Katherine K. Preston and Michael Meckna

(b Davenport, IA, March 15, 1924; d Seattle, March 5, 1977). American composer, music publisher and pianist . He studied composition with George McKay at the University of Washington (1938–42) and after military service joined the faculty there to teach piano and theory (1947–9). He was music director of the Eleanor King Dance Company (1947–50) and the pianist of the Seattle SO (1948–51); during these years he performed extensively throughout the Pacific Northwest in chamber ensembles and as a soloist.

In 1951 Johnson moved to New York, where he worked in the music publishing business as education director for Mercury Music (1951–4), head of the orchestral department at C.F. Peters (1954–8) and president of Dow Publishers (1957–62). After returning to Seattle, he served at the helm of the Cornish School of Music (1962–9) and in ...

Article

[Jan Antonín, Ioannes Antonius]

(b Velvary, June 26, 1747; d Vienna, May 7, 1818). Bohemian composer, pianist, music teacher and publisher. He was baptized Jan Antonín, but began (not later than 1773) to use the name Leopold to differentiate himself from his older cousin of that name. He received his basic music education in Velvary and then studied music in Prague with his cousin, who probably gave him a thorough grounding in counterpoint and vocal writing, and with F.X. Dušek, whose piano and composition school prepared him mainly for writing symphonies and piano sonatas. After the success of his first ballets and pantomimes (performed in Prague, 1771–8), Kozeluch abandoned his law studies for a career as a musician. In 1778 he went to Vienna, where he quickly made a reputation as an excellent pianist, teacher and composer. By 1781 he was so well established there that he could refuse an offer to succeed Mozart as court organist to the Archbishop of Salzburg. By ...

Article

James M. Burk

(b Sipperfeld, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany, July 22, 1840; d St. Louis, MO, Dec 3, 1923). American pianist, publisher, and composer of German origin. He came to the USA with his father and brother, Jacob (1846–82), in 1848, and settled in Cincinnati. He studied with Thalberg and Gottschalk, and played duets with Gottschalk in the latter’s recitals; he also played duets with his brother. In 1868 the Kunkel brothers moved to St. Louis, where they established a music store, publishing business, and the periodical, Kunkel’s Music Review (1878–1906), which included articles and sheet music. Kunkel founded the St. Louis Conservatory of Music in 1872 and Kunkel’s Popular Concerts (1884–1900). He also wrote piano works, including Alpine Storm, songs, and a comic opera, A Welch Rarebit (1901).

E.C. Krohn: “Charles Kunkel and Louis Moreau Gottschalk,” Bulletin of the Missouri Historical Society, 21 (1965), 284...

Article

Leonard B. Smith and Raoul F. Camus

[Brockton, Lester]

(b Southville, MA, Oct 25, 1879; d Palisade, NJ, March 16, 1955). American composer, conductor, editor and arranger. He studied at the New England Conservatory and was playing the violin with professional symphony orchestras in Boston by the age of 16. From 1896 to 1910 he conducted various theatre orchestras, including the orchestra of the Teatro Payret, Havana, then one of the largest theatres in the western hemisphere. He later moved to New York, where he wrote arrangements for Victor Herbert, John Philip Sousa, Edwin Franko Goldman, Percy Grainger, Henry Hadley and George M. Cohan. In 1913 he became editor-in-chief of band and orchestral music at Carl Fischer, a position he held for 35 years. His textbook, The American Band Arranger, was published by Fischer in 1920. He taught at the Ernest Williams School, Columbia University and New York University. He also conducted his band, Symphony in Gold, for NBC radio. More than 3000 of his arrangements and compositions were published, some under the pseudonym Lester Brockton. The Heritage of the March series of recordings includes a sample of his work. Lake’s autobiography is entitled ...

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Article

Samuel F. Pogue

revised by Frank Dobbins

(b Montreuil-sur-Mer, c1520; d Paris, 1598). French music printer, lutenist and composer. He was born into a wealthy merchant family from northern France. As a young man he entered successively the service of two members of the aristocracy close to the French throne, Claude de Clermont and Jacques II, Baron de Semblançay and Viscount of Tours. In March 1546 he became acquainted with the editor Jean de Brouilly in Paris, bought some properties from him in St Denis and married his daughter Denise (d before 1570). He moved to Brouilly’s house at the sign of Ste Geneviève (later the sign of Mount Parnassus) in the rue St Jean-de-Beauvais – an address which was to become famous as the home of one of the greatest of the French music printing establishments.

On 14 August 1551 Le Roy and his cousin Robert Ballard obtained a privilege from Henri II to print and sell all kinds of music books. Their first publication appeared at the end of the same month. On ...

Article

Anne Dhu McLucas

(d Boston, Aug 3, 1834). American organist, singer, publisher and composer . He was probably of French origin, and may have emigrated to America from London. His first public concert appearances in the USA were in Philadelphia and Newport, Rhode Island, in 1793. In the same year he settled in Boston, where he served as church organist and sang and played in concerts. His reputation as a performer rested mainly on his singing of oratorios. In 1801, with Gottlieb Graupner and Filippo Trajetta, he established the first conservatory of music in the USA. The ‘Conservatorio’ or ‘musical academy’ in Rowe’s Lane operated only from 1801 to 1802; during this time Graupner and Mallet were publishing partners, issuing around 20 items. From 1803 to 1807 Mallet published music independently and was a distributor in Boston for the Philadelphia publishers Carr and Schetky; he also sold American and English pianos (...

Article

(b Brussels, May 28, 1777; d Paris, Dec 18, 1858). Flemish composer, conductor, publisher and teacher. He was the son of Henri Mees (b Brussels, 1757; d Warsaw, 31 Jan 1820), principal baritone of the Théâtre de la Monnaie, Brussels, and of Anne-Marie Vitzthumb, a singer. He showed precocious musical talent: at the age of five he sang in a church choir, at seven he began to study the violin and at ten he played in the orchestra of the Monnaie. He had further violin studies with J.-E. Pauwels and lessons in harmony and counterpoint with his grandfather Ignaz Vitzthumb. In 1794, during the second French occupation, the family emigrated to Hamburg, where Henri Mees and other Brussels artists established a theatre for the Comédie-Française; Joseph-Henri occasionally sang secondary roles and conducted the orchestra there. He also opened a music shop, from which he published works from the Parisian repertory....

Article

Richard Jackson

[?Richard ]

(fl c1806–36). Pianist, teacher, publisher, and composer, probably of French origin. He was one of the many musicians in New York in the early 19th century who dabbled in several musical activities in order to earn a living. Meetz was listed as a music teacher in New York directories from 1810 to 1836 (he claimed in newspaper advertisements to have been a pupil of Mozart). He also appeared as a pianist, sold pianos, and sold and published music. Meetz was primarily the New York agent for the Philadelphia music publisher George E. Blake, though he did publish a few titles under his own name; two of his works for piano, General Lafayette’s Grand March and Quick Step (1824) and General Montgomery’s Dead March (?1818), bear a Philadelphia imprint. He was probably related to the pianist Cesarine Meetz and the pianist and singer Julius Metz...

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Joanne Swenson-Eldridge

(b 1793; d Philadelphia, June 4, 1873). American conductor, composer, publisher and teacher of French birth . He was a bandmaster in Napoleon’s army before emigrating to the USA, where he settled in Philadelphia (1828). In 1833 he was elected a member of the Musical Fund Society; that same year he founded the Philharmonic Society, an amateur orchestra in Philadelphia. His transcriptions of operatic excerpts and popular songs for the guitar date from as early as 1832. In 1835 he joined the music publisher Augustus Fiot in establishing the firm of Fiot and Meignen. After their partnership was dissolved in 1839, Meignen continued in the music publishing business until 1842. He succeeded Charles Hupfeld as conductor of the Musical Fund Society Orchestra during the 1844–5 season and held the post until 1857; his Grand Military Symphony was first performed under his direction on 17 April 1845. He also conducted the première of William Henry Fry’s ...

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John Griffiths

(bc1500; dc 1560). Spanish musician and writer. He is best known as the author of the first printed vihuela music, the Libro de musica de vihuela de mano intitulado El maestro (Valencia, 1536/R1975; ed. R. Chiesa, Milan, 1965, and C. Jacobs, University Park, PA, 1971). Along with his book of court games, Libro de motes de damas y cavalleros, intitulado El juego de mandar (Valencia, 1535), it was composed during his residence at the Valencian court of Germaine de Foix, where he remained until at least 1538. Establishing Milán's biography is made difficult by the existence of documents pertaining to more than one person of the same name. It is possible that he was a Valencian nobleman, son of Lluis del Milà, lord of Massalavés and Violant Eixarch. In this case, he took minor orders before 1542, became rector of the parish church of Onda (Tortosa), married before ...

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Frank Dobbins

(b Paris, c1510). French lutenist, editor and composer. He lived in Paris and was active as a ‘marchant et joueur d'instruments’ from 6 August 1541 when he took on an apprentice and agreed to teach him the viol and the lute. He maintained a variety of commercial interests; in 1548 he was involved in slave-trading and between 1549 and 1553 he dealt in engravings. On 13 February 1552 he obtained from Henri II a ten-year privilege to print, or have printed, music by his teacher, Alberto da Ripa, and tablatures for guitar, spinet and other instruments. On 19 April Michel Fezandat made an agreement with him to bear the whole cost of printing in return for half the proposed 1200 copies; Morlaye had simply to provide corrected proofs. The collaboration proved fruitful and during the next six years Fezandat printed under Morlaye's privilege three guitar (or cittern) books and four lutebooks, and the partbooks of two collections of four-voice psalms. Morlaye's voice, lute playing and Christian charity were praised in poems by Jacques Grévin published in ...

Article

David Johnson and Heather Melvill

(b Crail, bap. March 21, 1710; d Knebworth, Herts., Jan 2, 1769). Scottish composer, publisher, arranger and cellist. His father, John Oswald (d Berwick-upon-Tweed, bur. 2 Oct 1758), a skilled musician, was town drummer of Crail and later became leader of the town waits at Berwick-upon-Tweed; his brother Henry (b Crail, 1714) also became a professional musician. By 1734 Oswald was teaching dancing in Dunfermline. A sketchbook (Lord Balfour of Burleigh’s private collection, microfilm in GB-En ) shows many features of his compositional style already in place. A set of tunes for scordatura violin (in The Caledonian Pocket Companion, x, c1760), dedicated to patrons in the Fife and Tayside area, was probably written at this time, along with the airs for violin and continuo The braes of Ballendine and Alloa House (in A Curious Collection of Scots Tunes, 1740). In 1735...

Article

Horace Clarence Boyer

(b Atlanta, GA, Aug 4, 1886; d Pittsburgh, PA, Dec 16, 1963). American gospel composer and publisher. When he was 13 he settled with his family in Chicago, where he continued to study piano and began to write gospel songs and arrange black spirituals for the Beth Eden and Liberty Baptist churches. In 1925 he formed the Pace Jubilee Singers, an early conservative gospel group which recorded songs by Pace, Tindley, and others for Victor and Brunswick (1926–9). For a short time the group was accompanied by Thomas A. Dorsey, for whom Pace published several songs through his Pace Music House (established in Chicago in 1910). Pace moved to Pittsburgh in 1936 and shortly afterwards organized the Pace Gospel Choral Union, a 25-member ensemble that was enlarged to as many as 300 singers for special celebrations; its repertory consisted of gospel songs and spirituals. Pace also founded two highly successful music publishing houses in Pittsburgh—the Old Ship of Zion Music Company (...

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Charles K. Wolfe

(b nr West Monroe, LA, Aug 8, 1921; d Nashville, TN, Feb 24, 1991). American country-music singer, guitarist, songwriter, and publisher. He performed as a guitarist on radio station KMLB (Monroe, LA) before 1950, when he joined the “Louisiana hayride ” on KWKH (Shreveport, LA). Recording contracts with the local Pacemaker label (c1950), Four-Star, and Decca (1951) allowed him to resign his part-time job as a clerk at Sears, Roebuck and concentrate on music. After his initial hit, “Wondering” (1952), he gained national attention with “Back Street Affair” (1952), one of the first country songs to deal forthrightly with adultery. An equally important landmark was “There stands the glass” (1953), a classic drinking song and the first country hit to use the pedal steel guitar, played by Bud Isaacs. It became the favorite backup instrument in country music for the next two decades, and Pierce was the first of many country singers whose slurs, octave jumps, and use of dynamics complemented its sound. During his peak years (...

Article

Albert Mell

revised by Matthias Wiegandt

(b Berlin, Dec 28, 1812; d Dresden, Sept 12, 1877). German cellist, composer, conductor and editor, brother of Eduard Rietz. He studied the cello from the age of eight with Franz Schmidt, Bernhard Romberg and Moritz Ganz. In 1829 he joined the orchestra of the Königstadt theatre. Refusing Spontini's offer of a post in the Berlin court orchestra, he went to Düsseldorf in 1834 to assist Mendelssohn at the Opera; though nominally only assistant conductor he did most of the conducting. When Mendelssohn left Düsseldorf, Rietz became the city's musical director. During the next 12 years he established a reputation as a conductor and a composer; more than two dozen works of his were published, including the music for Goethe's Singspiel Jery und Bately, two symphonies, a cello concerto and several sets of lieder. He continued to play the cello in public, with Ferdinand Hiller and Ferdinand David among others. He assisted Mendelssohn at the Lower Rhine Festival of ...

Article

Matthew Greenall

(b London, Sept 24, 1945). English composer, conductor and editor. He was a chorister at Highgate School, following which he studied music at Clare College, Cambridge. He then taught at the University of Southampton, returning to Clare College as the director of music in 1975. In 1979 he left to devote himself to composition and subsequently to found the Cambridge Singers, a professional choir with whom he has made many recordings, both of his own music and of other (mainly European) choral works. Rutter has concentrated on composing vocal music, particularly for choirs. Within this field he has become probably the most popular and widely performed composer of his generation, especially in the UK and the USA. His idiom grows out of the British choral tradition as exemplified by Holst, Vaughan Williams, Howells, Britten and Tippett, but also draws on a wider sympathy for European music of the later 19th and early 20th centuries, especially the harmonic and melodic language of Fauré, Duruflé and their contemporaries. Rutter's particular gift is for skilled craftsmanship and memorable phrase, found at its simplest in works such as the anthem ...