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Vizugo  

Wooden bell of the Shambala people of Tanzania.

(1) An hourglass-shaped double bell with three clappers at each end.

(2) A trough-shaped rectangular bell with numerous clappers suspended from a cord.

Article

Waka  

Ronnie Graham

Yoruba percussive and vocal genre. Waka has its origins in south-west Nigeria, where extensive Islamic conversion during the 19th century produced a variety of musical genres performed during key periods in the Muslim calendar. Waka (Hausa term for song or poem) was originally sung by women, accompanied by handclaps and beaten ...

Article

Washint  

Claire Lacombe

End-blown flute of Ethiopia. It is made of a kind of bamboo (schembeko) in various lengths and pitches and typically has four to six equidistant fingerholes, sometimes with any unused ones covered with adhesive paper. The blowing edge is sanded straight rather than notched, and the flute is held obliquely. It is played exclusively by males, often to improvise luxuriant ornamentations on folk melodies. Traditionally, the ...

Article

A type of musical bow sounded by swinging it rapidly around as with a bullroarer. It is found in West Africa, China, Indonesia and parts of Latin America, and is classified in the Hornbostel-Sachs system as a free Aerophone (whirling). See Musical bow.

Article

Wonga  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Whistle of the Barambo people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is carved of wood, spindle-shaped and about 14 cm long. (LaurentyA, 183)

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Drum of the Yeke people in the Shaba region, Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is a very large, double-headed instrument, part of the king’s regalia. The heads, of buffalo, antelope, or elk skin, are laced together and beaten with two sticks. The yamilango may be played only by the king and only on official occasions. (...

Article

Yeye  

Cylindrical Slit-drum of the Konda people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is made from wood, 30 to 50 cm long and 15 to 20 cm in diameter, and has a square hole at both ends of the slit. The yeye is held in the crook of the left arm and is beaten with one stick; it accompanies dancing. ...

Article

Yua  

Laurence Libin

End-blown notched wooden flute or whistle found throughout northern Ghana particularly among the Builsa and Kasena Nankani peoples. It is played with drums and xylophone or alone by shepherds and hunters, sometimes for signaling or as a bird call. A modern commercial version, 12 cm long, has two fingerholes, one on either side in protrusions covered by thumb and index finger....

Article

Single-string harp of the Fang people of Gabon. It is played exclusively by women.

Article

Zamonga  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Whistle of the Sango people in the northern Democratic Republic of the Congo. The cylindro-conical wooden tube is typically about 38 cm long and is partly covered with animal skin. (LaurentyA, 180)

Article

Zei  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Whistle of the Mamvu people in the Uele region, Democratic Republic of the Congo. The wooden body, typically about 16 cm long, has a slender conical bore. (LaurentyA, 156)

Article

K.A. Gourlay and Ferdinand J. de Hen

Stick zither widely distributed throughout the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The stick is a solid bar of wood 55 to 65 cm long and 2 to 3 cm wide throughout most of its length. Both ends of the bar terminate in a small knob to which the strings, of plant fibre, are attached. Three cylindrical ‘frets’ protrude on both sides of the stick. The U-shaped bridge is usually made of a feather quill. One or more drone strings pass beside the frets. A resonator made of two superposed calabash halves, or seldom a single half-calabash shell, is attached near one end; it is affixed to the underside of the bar by means of a small part-calabash collar and a cord. The zither produces four notes (open string and one note from each of the three frets) together with the drone(s). Accounts of the method of performance vary. Among the Shi the zither is held to the left so that the frets can be stopped with the fingers of the left hand while the thumb activates the drone string and the fingers of the right hand stroke the melody string. The half-calabash is usually placed on the player‘s chest and opened or closed in the same way as the resonator of a ...

Article

Zupu  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

End-blown gourd horn of the Sere people in the Uele region, Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is bulbous and about 35 cm long. (LaurentyA, 311)