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John Baily

(b Guildford, Oct 22, 1928; d Belfast, Jan 24, 1990). British anthropologist and ethnomusicologist. Raised in the Anglican environment of Salisbury Cathedral close, his father, the cathedral architect, was closely concerned with the restoration of the Sarum rite and with the Dolmetsch early music revival. Blacking served as a commissioned officer in the Coldstream Guards, with active service in Malaya (...

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Gareth Dylan Smith

(b Yellow Springs, OH, Nov 18, 1959). American drummer. She was raised in Connecticut among a family of eclectic musicians and music-lovers. At the age of eight she decided to become a drummer. She played in school ensembles and a local fife-and-drum corps before studying classical percussion at the University of Hartford and jazz at the Berklee College of Music. From ...

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John H. Baron

(b Bennington, VT, 1826; d New Orleans, Oct 28, 1888). American music publisher. He worked as a music teacher in Huntsville, Alabama (1845–52), and Jackson, Louisiana (1852–5). In 1858 he joined E.D. Patton’s music shop in Vicksburg, Mississippi, which he bought out the following year with his younger brother Henry (...

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Ian D. Bent

(fl c1261). English singer. One of three Englishmen described by the late 13th-century theorist Anonymus 4 as ‘good singers’ of mensural polyphony, who sang with great refinement (‘valde deliciose’). The theorist referred to him as ‘Blakesmit, at the court of the late King Henry [III]’. He was clerk of the king's chapel in ...

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A. Dean Palmer and Paige Clark Lush

(b Eufaula, OK, Dec 13, 1882; d San Diego, Jan 10, 1985). Mezzo-soprano of Cherokee and Creek descent, though often misidentified as Choctaw or Omaha. She attended the Eufaula, Oklahoma Government Indian School, where she learned to play the piano. Although she was frequently billed as “Princess Tsianina,” there is no indication that Tsianina’s family held any leadership role in their community. At the urging of school officials, 16-year-old Tsianina was sent to Denver to study piano with Edward Fleck. She also studied voice with John Wilcox, who introduced her to composer ...

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Dave Laing

(b London, June 22, 1937). English music producer. The owner of Island Records, he was a key figure in the internationalization of Jamaican popular music in the 1970s, notably through his association with Bob Marley and the Wailers. Island also nurtured the leading rock performers Steve Winwood, Free and U2. Blackwell grew up in Jamaica where he began his musical career, recording local singers. He moved to London in ...

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Michael Ullman and Barry Kernfeld

(b New Orleans, 10 Oct 1929; d Hartford, CT, 7 Oct 1992). American drummer. Two of his siblings were musicians and tap-dancers who fostered his interest in playing drums, and he was influenced at an early age by the work of Paul Barbarin. In the late 1940s he played in a rhythm-and-blues band led by Plas Johnson and Raymond Johnson. Having first performed with Ornette Coleman in New Orleans in ...

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(b New Orleans, LA, Oct 10, 1929; d Hartford, CT, Oct 7, 1992). American jazz drummer and educator. He grew up in a musical family in New Orleans. During the 1950s he was a member of the American Jazz Quintet, which included Ellis Marsalis, Alvin Battiste, Harold Battiste, and, for a time, Ornette Coleman. He also worked irregularly with Coleman between ...

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Ian Spink

(d London, 1699). English composer and organist. He was organist of two London parish churches – St Dunstan-in-the-West (1674) and St Michael's, Cornhill (1684) – before becoming a vicar-choral of St Paul’s Cathedral on 7 February 1687. From about that same time he combined all these posts with that of organist of the cathedral, continuing as such until his death, whereupon he was succeeded by Jeremiah Clarke (i). He was thus the first to use Bernard Smith’s new organ (...

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Dave Laing

(b Brooklyn, NY, 1931; d Nashville, TN, May 6, 2002). American rhythm and blues songwriter and singer. His list of over 900 songs includes several of Elvis Presley's best-known hits. Blackwell's earliest success as a black songwriter came with Fever, written for the singer Little Willie John in ...

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(b NC, Feb 21, 1903; d Indianapolis, IN, Oct 7, 1962). American blues guitarist. See under Carr, Leroy.

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James R. McKay

(b Indianapolis, IN, April 21, 1933). American composer and pianist. He studied with Messiaen at the Berkshire Music Center (1949), with Hindemith at Yale (1950–54) and, on a Fulbright scholarship, with Boulanger in Paris (1954–7). From 1958 to 1997...

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( b 1807; d Highgate, June 13, 1867). English composer . She was a granddaughter of Richard Brinsley Sheridan, statesman and dramatist, and Elizabeth Sheridan (née Linley), celebrated English soprano. She collaborated with her sister, Caroline Norton, on a publication entitled A Set of ten Songs and two Duets … by two Sisters...

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Howard Mayer Brown and Barra R. Boydell

A wind instrument in which a reed is enclosed by an animal bladder. The player blows through a mouthpiece into the bladder, which serves, like the bag of a bagpipe, as a wind reservoir. Thus the performer does not directly control the reed with the lips; the instrument probably cannot be overblown, but has a compass limited by the number of finger-holes. The bladder pipe is depicted in a number of late medieval and Renaissance sources, but no specimens survive from that period. It is related to the ...

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Daniel John Carroll

(b Shreveport, LA, July 25, 1970). American jazz drummer, bandleader, and composer. During his early years he became acquainted with gospel and soul music, studied violin, recorder and melodic percussion and eventually began playing drums in his father’s church. While in high school he began listening to John Coltrane, Charlie Parker and other jazz musicians and worked with the Polyphonics, a jazz group led by Dorsey Summerfield Jr. After moving to New Orleans in ...

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Tania Camacho-Azofeifa

(b Panama City, Panama, July 16, 1946). Panamanian singer, songwriter, actor, and activist. His musical projects are mostly defined by his commitment to social justice and civil rights. The US military occupation of the Canal Zone and riots of 1964, and the military coup of ...

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Noël Goodwin and Matthew Dickinson

(b Peterborough, Sept 9, 1901; d Cheam, May 19, 1999). English timpanist and percussionist. He was apprenticed as an engineer, but a youthful passion for drumming led him to join the band of a travelling circus when he was 19. Engagements in orchestras accompanying silent films followed. Here he played a lot of the standard orchestral repertory and accompanied many of the variety acts that performed between films, often having to invent sound effects as he went along. His early career was spent playing in dance bands and making recordings, the most famous of which perhaps being the three Chinese tam-tam notes that heralded the beginning of every Rank film after ...

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Thomas W. Bridges

(b Asola, nr Mantua, 1490; d Rome, 1567). Italian printer. From 1516 until his death Blado printed more than 1200 editions in Rome as well as a few elsewhere. For the popular market he printed guidebooks, prognostications, devotional books and the like, and under clerical or aristocratic sponsorship classical and modern literature, books in Greek and Hebrew, theological works and much else. His books use a variety of ornaments, decorated initials and typefaces, including the Ethiopic type of his ...

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Pamela Weston

(b Brussels, Dec 1, 1814; d Brussels, Jan 11, 1892). Belgian clarinettist. The son of an amateur clarinettist, he was orphaned at ten. His guardian discouraged the child’s passion for music and sent him out to work as a clerk at the Ministry of Finance when only 13. A few years later relatives overcame the guardian’s scruples and the boy was allowed to buy a clarinet. While still earning his living, Blaes enrolled at the Brussels Conservatory as a pupil of Georges Chrétien Bachmann and won first prize in ...

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Pamela Weston

(b Antwerp, Nov 2, 1817; d Brussels, Nov 6, 1878). Belgian coloratura soprano, wife of Arnold Joseph Blaes. Mendelssohn admired her and engaged her for concerts at the Leipzig Gewandhaus in 1839, 1841 and 1842. She first sang for the Philharmonic Society of London in ...