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Magdalena Manolova

Town in Bulgaria. The centre of a region rich in folklore, in recent decades it has become a cultural focal point in the south-western part of the country. Opera performances have been given since 1972 under the successive company names Mladezhka Opera (Youth Opera), Kamerna Mladezhka Opera (Chamber Youth Opera) and Mladezhka Opera za Vsichki (Youth Opera for All), with the local première of Haydn’s ...

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Peter Holman

(b c1620; d London, Nov 21, 1688). English composer, cornett player, violinist and singer. He was the son of Richard Blagrave, wind player at Charles I's court, and joined his father in the cornett and sackbut consort in 1637, inheriting his place in ...

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Christina Bashford

English family of musicians.

(b Nottingham, Oct 20, 1811; d London, Dec 15, 1872). Violinist. He was the son of Richard Manning Blagrove, a Nottingham violinist and teacher who wrote A New and Improved System of the Art of Playing the Violin (London, ...

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(b Guntramsdorf, nr Vienna, Nov 15, 1809; d Boulogne-sur-Mer, Jan 17, 1885). Austrian pianist and composer. Over a period of more than 60 years she made a major contribution to the image of the professional woman pianist. On the advice of Beethoven, who followed her musical development with interest, she studied the piano with Joseph Czerný; her teachers also included Joachim Hoffmann, Catharina Cibbini, Simon Sechter, and, for a short period, Kalkbrenner and Moscheles. She first performed in public in ...

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John Clapham

(b Přerov, Feb 20, 1523; d Moravský Krumlov, Nov 24, 1571). Czech music theorist, hymnographer, grammarian and poet. He studied theory under Listenius and Hermann Finck at Wittenberg University from 1544. After a short period at Mladá Boleslav (1548–9) he continued his education at Königsberg and Basle. He was a fine linguist who strove to preserve the purity of his native tongue and succeeded in bridging the gulf between Christianity and humanism. He was ordained at Mladá Boleslav in ...

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E.D. Mackerness

(b London, July 13, 1846; d London, Dec 29, 1936). English acoustician. He was principally noted for his design and manufacture of wind instruments. He had a long career with the firm of Boosey & Hawkes and when Boosey’s took over the business of Henry Distin in ...

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Steven Baur

(b Holyoke, MA, Feb 5, 1929). American drummer. He is best known for playing on pop, rock, and country recordings during the 1960s and 70s with such successful artists as Herb Albert, America, the Association, the Beach Boys, the Byrds, the Carpenters, Petula Clark, Sam Cooke, John Denver, Neil Diamond, the Fifth Dimension, Connie Francis, Lesley Gore, Jan and Dean, the Mamas and the Papas, Henry Mancini, Dean Martin, the Monkees, Roy Orbison, Elvis Presley, the Ronettes, Simon and Garfunkel, Frank Sinatra, Nancy Sinatra, Sonny and Cher, Barbara Streisand, the Supremes, and Tanya Tucker. Between ...

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(b nr Tours, 1711; d Paris, 1769). French theorist, composer and cellist. The Marquise de Villeroy was for a time his pupil and patron. He claimed the discovery of a third mode (‘mode mixte’) between major and minor, and his theories provoked controversy and criticism (from Daquin, La Borde and others); after the performance of his symphony in the newly discovered third mode, on ...

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Mike Hazeldine

(b Savannah, GA, Oct 10, 1903; d New York, Oct 15, 1966). American banjoist and guitarist. He taught himself to play both banjo and guitar left-handed, though he later received a little tuition from Paul Whiteman’s banjoist, Mike Pingitore. In 1926 he joined an orchestra in New York that included Tommy and Bill Benford and was led by the pianist Charlie Skeete; the following year the band (now led by Bill Benford) became resident at the Rose Danceland, and in ...

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Barry Kernfeld and Gary W. Kennedy

(b Pittsburgh, Aug 13, 1940). American drummer. He began playing in rhythm-and-blues groups in 1955 and then worked with the pianist Charles Bell in the Contemporary Jazz Quartet, with which he recorded in 1960 and 1962 (on the latter occasion alongside Ron Carter). In ...

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Martha Woodward

(b Tellico Plains, TN, Jan 5, 1912; d Portola Valley, CA, March 11, 2009). American flutist. A pupil of Ernest Wagner and georges Barrère, she graduated from the Juilliard School, having won the concerto competition at the age of 18, and studied in France with Marcel Moyse. She played in New York on Broadway, with the Phil Spitalny All Girls’ Band, and as accompanist to Lily Pons. In ...

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Michael Fend

Comédie mêlée d’ariettes in two acts by Nicolas Dezède to a libretto by Jacques Marie Boutet de Monvel; Versailles, 4 April 1783 (Paris, Comédie-Italienne, Salle Favart, 30 June 1783).

After mutual accusations of disloyalty, the marriage between Blaise (tenor) and Babet (soprano) is called off by his father, Delorme (bass-baritone), and her mother, Alix (soprano). Mathurin (baritone) reads a letter from Belval (baritone) saying that he has unexpectedly won the trial mentioned in ...

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Julian Rushton

Opéra comique in one act by François-André Danican Philidor to a libretto by Michel-Jean Sedaine after Jean de La Fontaine’s story; Paris, Opéra-Comique (Théâtre de la Foire St Germain), 9 March 1759.

Blaise (tenor) and Blaisine (soprano) quarrel over his improvidence and their debts. He wants to go to Mathurin’s where his cousin Nicaise is to be married; she wants him to work. Their argument continues while two bailiff’s clerks take stock of their furniture; during a quintet the fury of the landlady, Mme Pince (soprano), unites the couple. Blaise is penitent and evolves a scheme. Hope of Blaisine’s sexual favours induces M. Pince (tenor) to relinquish the IOU for the rent, but Blaise’s entrance forces him to hide in the wardrobe where he overhears Mme Pince making immoral overtures to Blaise. The older couple, each persuaded that the other has received the money, part in confusion. The printed score ends with the next duet, but the libretto includes scenes with dancing for the wedding of Nicaise....

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Jeffrey R. Rehbach

(d ?Paris, 1772). French bassoonist and composer. He was probably the son of a bassoonist at the Comédie-Italienne in Paris in the late 17th century, who may have been maître de chapelle at Limoges in 1717. The younger Blaise was a bassoonist at the Comédie-Italienne by ...

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Theodore Karp

(d after March 1229). French trouvère. He was Seneschal of Poitou, and of a noble family with holdings in Blason and Mirabel; his uncle, Maurice, was Bishop of Poitiers. Thibaut was among the negotiators of the truce of 1214 between King Philip II Augustus of France and King John of England. Together with Hue de la Ferté, he was among the nobles at the coronation of Louis IX (St Louis). He took part in a crusade against the Moors in ...

Article

Erik H.A. Jakobsen

(b Fredericia, March 31, 1947). Danish composer and musician. He studied music at Århus University from 1966 to 1971, and moved to the Faeroes in 1974, where he soon became an important musical figure. As a music administrator, Blak has in particular played a key role: he took the initiative for, among others, the Musikforbunden, the Komponistforeningen, the festival ‘Summartonar’, the Tórshavn Jazz Club and the record company TUTL. He is an active folk and jazz musician, playing the piano in several groups, including Spillemaendene (from ...

Article

Mark Miller

(b London, Dec 8, 1970). Canadian tenor and soprano saxophonist of English birth. He was brought up in Vancouver and studied saxophone there, then attended the Berklee College of Music in Boston (1988–92), where his teachers included George Garzone and Joe Viola. He made his recording début with Victor Lewis while still at Berklee and continued to work with the drummer after moving in ...

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(b Panama City, Panama, Dec 21, 1951). Panamanian bass player. His father was a professional double bass player. In winter 1958 he moved with his family to New York and settled in Brooklyn. He took up double bass about two years later, initially playing baby bass, and by the age of 12 he was performing professionally in Latin music groups, notably those of Machito, Mongo Santamaria, and Eddie Palmieri. In ...

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Roger Fiske and Simon McVeigh

(b Hackney, Feb 22, 1751; d London, 1827). English violinist, viola player and composer. Almost all we know of him comes from information he himself supplied for Sainsbury’s dictionary in 1824. As a boy he was taught the violin by Antonín Kammel, and later by Wilhelm Cramer, leader of the Italian Opera orchestra at the King’s Theatre. Blake himself played the violin in this orchestra from about ...

Article

Paul Oliver

(b Newport News, VA, 1896; d Milwaukee, WI, Dec 1, 1934). American songster, blues singer, and guitarist. He is known to have played extensively in Florida and was well known as a songster and guitarist in Georgia and the eastern states. Although he was blind, he traveled as far as Tennessee and Detroit. Between ...