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Noël Goodwin

(b Cheam, Surrey, Feb 20, 1948). English conductor. He studied conducting with Boult at the RCM and the harpsichord with Leonhardt in Amsterdam. His first association with the Royal Ballet was as soloist in Frank Martin’s Harpsichord Concerto for Kenneth MacMillan’s Las hermanas, after which he was invited to conduct the touring company in 1973. From 1974 to 1984 he was principal conductor for Sadler’s Wells Royal Ballet; he also worked as guest conductor with the Royal Ballet, the Australian Ballet and the National Ballet of Canada, and was music director of New Sadler’s Wells Opera for seasons of operetta in the 1980s. In 1991 he became music director of both the Royal Ballet in London and the Birmingham Royal Ballet, reverting to guest status with the London company in 1995. He was appointed music director of the BBC Concert Orchestra in 1989 and has appeared with other major British orchestras, making his opera début at Covent Garden with ...

Article

Helmut Wirth

(b Troppau, Austrian Silesia [now Opava, Czech Republic], Oct 8, 1860; d Altona, Hamburg, March 20, 1944). German composer and choral conductor. He grew up in Dresden, and in early youth moved to Hamburg to study with Ernst August Heinrich Chevallier; in Altona he was conductor successively of the Allgemeine Liedertafel (from 1887), the church choir (from 1893) and the Singakademie (from 1895). In addition, he was organist of the Friedenskirche (1895–1903) and then of the Johanniskirche (1903–26), and from 1903 he directed the city orchestral concerts. Elected to the Prussian Academy of Arts in 1917, he received the Goethe Medal in 1936, and in 1937 he retired from public musical life. He had met with Brahms’s esteem as a young man, and in his early vocal music he took Brahms and also Palestrina, Lassus, Schütz and Bach as his models. Later he turned more to instrumental music, and his chamber pieces, his Brahmsian symphonies and the ...

Article

Milan Poštolka

revised by Roger Hickman

[Pavel]

(b Nová Říše, Moravia, Dec 30, 1756; d Vienna, Sept 26, 1808). Czech composer, conductor and violinist active in Vienna, brother of Anton Wranitzky. He studied singing and the organ, violin and viola at the Premonstratensian monastery grammar school in Nová Říše, and later at Jihlava (1770–71). At Olomouc he studied theology and became an excellent violinist. At 20 he went to Vienna, where he entered the theological seminary and served as its choirmaster. He continued his musical studies with J.M. Kraus (the Kapellmeister to the Swedish court, who visited Vienna in about 1783). Suggestions that he was also a pupil of Haydn remain unsubstantiated.

He served as music director for Count Johann Baptist Esterházy in the spring of 1784 and was appointed director of the newly created Kärntnertortheater orchestra in October 1785, a position he held until 1787, when he joined the Burgtheater orchestra. He was named its director in either ...

Article

John Bourgeois

(b London, UK, June 23, 1916). American band director, conductor, and educator of English birth. He immigrated to the US in 1923 and studied at the University of Miami (BA 1937, MEd 1947). He was instrumental in founding many band organizations including the Florida Bandmasters Association and the National Bandmasters Association. He led the Miami Senior High School (1938–54), the Purdue University Marching Band (1954–85), and the Purdue Symphony (1969–85). His Purdue University Marching Band set the standard for American college marching bands and many of his marching innovations are in use today. He developed the McDonald’s All American Marching Band and led many high school concert bands on international tours. He is chairman of the board and chief executive officer of the John Philip Sousa Foundation. His many honors include honorary life president of the American Bandmasters Association and an honorary doctorate of laws from Troy State University (...

Article

John Bourgeois

(b Wasco, OR, March 8, 1925).American music educator and conductor. She studied at the University of Oregon (BA 1948, ME 1953). She married Al Wright in 1953. As a teaching band director she led the high school bands of Elmira, Oregon (1948–53), Otterbein, Indiana (1954–61), Klondike, West Lafayette, Indiana (1963–70) and William Henry Harrison, West Lafayette, Indiana (1970–84). The William Henry Harrison Band toured extensively throughout the USA, Europe, Central America and Canada; she won the Gold Medal of the World Music Contest of Kerkrade, Holland in 1974. She is the founding president of the Women Band Directors National Association, founding editor of Woman Conductor magazine, and the first woman band director elected to the American Bandmasters Association and the National Band Directors Hall of Fame of Distinguished Band Conductors. In 1995 she was elected to the National Hall of Fame of Distinguished Woman Band Conductors. She is a vice president of the John Philip Sousa Foundation, where she chairs the Sudler Flag and Cup awards, which acknowledge the achievements of outstanding high school and middle-school bands. She is the composer of two quickstep marches, ...

Article

Barbara Chmara-Żackiewicz

(b Kraków, 1850 or 1851; d Krynica, Dec 17, 1915). Polish violinist, conductor and composer . He was educated at the music school of the Kraków Technical Institute, studying the violin with Ignacy Wójcikiewicz, theory and wind instruments with Piotr Studziński, and the piano with Józef Blaschke. Later, he studied at the Vienna Conservatory. While serving in the Austrian army Wroński played the violin in the orchestra of the 70th Infantry Regiment under the direction of Michał Zimmermann, from whom he learned much about the craft of instrumentation. He soon became assistant conductor, and in 1867 he went with the orchestra to the Paris Exposition Universelle, where they won first prize. For several years he was musical director of the band of the 40th Infantry Regiment, from which, with great effort, he was able to create a full symphony orchestra. The latter had a great impact on the musical culture of Kraków, promoting important works and becoming part of the Old Theatre (Teatr Stary), where it accompanied performances and played during the entr'actes (under the direction of S. Koźmian). The orchestra also collaborated with the Kraków operetta (under the direction of K. Hofman), and stimulated the amateur musical scene. In ...

Article

Gerhard Conrad

(b Mayen, Germany, June 19, 1961). German trombonist, arranger, and bandleader. He began his music studies in 1980 with Jiggs Whigham in Cologne. From 1983 to 1984 he was a member of the band led by the clarinetist and saxophonist Pierre Paquette, then joined Rod Mason. While with Mason (until 1991) he wrote his first arrangements and also worked as a studio musician and as a teacher at the Musikhochschule Cologne and at the university in Bonn. From 1992 he led his own band, Joe Wulf and his Gentlemen of Swing, and changed his style from traditional jazz to swing of the 1930s and 1940s. From October to December 1998 he toured with Buddy DeFranco and Terry Gibbs.

Article

Gaynor G. Jones

revised by Bernd Wiechert

(b Münster, Jan 28, 1832; d Braunfels, Sept 7, 1902). German conductor, pianist and composer , father of Ludwig Wüllner. From an early age he studied the violin and the piano and composed music. His father was a distinguished philologist who was director of the Düsseldorf Gymnasium; when he died in 1842 the family moved to Münster, where Franz studied the piano and composition with Carl Arnold; from 1846 to 1850 he studied with Anton Schindler in Münster and Frankfurt. From 1850 to 1854 he went on concert tours, playing Beethoven's late sonatas, and completed his studies, visiting Berlin, Brussels, Cologne and Leipzig and meeting many of the important musicians of his day. A lifelong friendship linked him with Brahms from 1853. From 1856 he taught the piano at the music school in Munich before being made music director of Aachen in 1858. He returned to Munich in 1865...

Article

(b Southampton, May 18, 1860; d Munich, Jan 21, 1938). British pianist, conductor and composer of German parentage. She studied the piano and composition at the Stuttgart conservatory and later became a piano pupil of Clara Schumann, Joachim Raff, Franklin Taylor, józef Wieniawski and others. Her composition teachers in London included Arthur Sullivan, C. V. Stanford and Frederick Bridge; she won the Mendelssohn Scholarship three times in succession, which enabled her to study composition at Leipzig, with Carl Reinecke, in 1886. She made her début as a pianist at Crystal Palace in 1882, and followed this with engagements in London, Leipzig, Meiningen and Berlin. Germany was her home for most of her life; she became a teacher in Hanover and Berlin, and eventually moved to Munich. In 1898 she established a women’s orchestra in Berlin which she conducted and took on tour until 1900. Her sisters, Adela, Alice and Matilde, changed the family name to Verne, and pursued careers as pianists in England....

Article

John Warrack

revised by Rosemary Williamson

(b Bushey, Herts., May 22, 1822; d London, March 13, 1890). English conductor, composer and writer on music . The son of Henry Wylde (b 1795), an organist and gentleman-in-waiting to George IV, he became organist of Whitchurch and then at 16 had piano lessons from Moscheles; from 1843 to 1846 he studied with Cipriani Potter at the RAM, where he was later a professor of piano. He was organist of St Anne and St Agnes, Gresham Street (1844–7). In 1851 he gained the degree of MusDoc at Cambridge. He was a juror in the musical instrument section in the international exhibitions of 1851 and 1862, and was made professor at Gresham College in 1863.

In 1852 the New Philharmonic Society was founded, with Wylde as a guarantor, to introduce new or rare works. The first six concerts were conducted by Berlioz and Wylde, with Wylde in the second concert directing his own Piano Concerto in F minor (with Alexandre Billet), in the fourth his scena ...