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Wolfram Knauer

revised by Barry Kernfeld

(b Kraków, Poland, April 1, 1945). Polish tenor and soprano saxophonist, clarinetist, and flutist. He first played clarinet in local bands, then, after winning a scholarship in a competition in Vienna, moved to Austria to study at the Hochschule für Musik in Graz (1966). During his three years there he played with Eje Thelin, and in 1970 he joined the newly formed big band of Österreichischer Rundfunk, led from 1972 by Erich Kleinschuster. Later he played with Kleinschuster’s sextet, and from around 1970 he led his own groups. In 1974 he moved to Munich. He performed with the European Jazz Quintet (1977–82) and recorded with Michael Naura and the poet Peter Rühmkorff (1978, 1987) and with the group Springtime, led by Günter Lenz (1979). In the 1980s he toured with George Russell and Elvin Jones and recorded with Bireli Lagrene (...

Article

Barry Kernfeld

[Rubin ]

(b New York, June 12, 1915; d Irvine, CA, April 11, 2009). American trumpeter. After recording under the bandleader Joe Haymes (1935–6) he toured and recorded with Benny Goodman (1936) and Artie Shaw (1936–7), by turns with Bob Crosby and Red Norvo (1937–9), and with Tommy Dorsey (1939–40) and Glenn Miller (1940); he continued to play in Miller’s bands while working as a staff musician at NBC (recording in 1941 and 1942) and while serving in the US Army (touring and recording from October 1942 to 1945). Having settled in Los Angeles, he worked in studios and as a freelance; he made recordings with Boyd Raeburn (1945), Goodman and Woody Herman (1947), Crosby (1950–51), Jerry Gray (1950, c1959), Sarah Vaughan (1951), Ray Anthony (...

Article

Howard Rye

[Little Bear ]

(b New Orleans, May 27, 1900; d New Orleans, Aug 14, 1990). American double bass player. He learned double bass in 1916, taking lessons from Billy Marrero, and performed locally (c1919) and in California with Buddy Petit. In the 1920s he played in New Orleans with Chris Kelly, Kid Rena, and A. J. Piron, among others, and in the early 1930s he was on the Mississippi riverboats with Sidney Desvigne (on double bass and tuba) and Fats Pichon, with whom he also played in Memphis (late 1934 – early 1935). He then worked with Harold Dejan (1936–7), Kid Howard (c1937), as a leader (with Polo Barnes among his sidemen), and again with Pichon on the SS Capitol (1939), and recorded with Bunk Johnson (1942) and George Lewis (i) (1943). After his military service he held a long residency in Denver during which he was a member of the band led by the violinist George Morrison, and in ...

Article

Barry Kernfeld

[Josef Erich ]

(b Vienna, July 7, 1932; d Vienna, September 11, 2007). American keyboard player, composer, and bandleader. He played accordion as a child and then began classical piano lessons; later he studied music at the Vienna Conservatory. In the early 1950s he performed with leading Austrian dance and radio orchestras and worked as house pianist for Polydor; he also played with Hans Koller (1952), Friedrich Gulda (including a period in 1955 when he played bass trumpet), and Karl Drewo and Fatty George (both from 1956). In 1959 he emigrated to the USA. After touring with Maynard Ferguson (1959) and serving as accompanist to Dinah Washington (October 1959 – March 1961) he spent a month with Harry Edison’s quintet accompanying Joe Williams. In April 1961 he joined Cannonball Adderley, with whom he performed and recorded until 1970. He also played with Miles Davis in the late 1960s and early 1970s. In ...

Article

Jaroslav Pašmik

[Buddy ]

(b Rokycany, Czechoslovakia [now Czech Republic], Sept 16, 1964). Czech drummer. His parents were amateur musicians. From the age of 12 he played clarinet, saxophone, and drums and performed in a local brass band. He studied drums and percussion at the conservatory in Plzeň (1979–85), where he played in different rock bands and began to concentrate on jazz. In 1987 he became a member of the Czech Radio Jazz Orchestra (known from the early 1990s as Big Band Radio Prague), and he also performed with a variety of small jazz and funk groups in Prague, in the course of which he had opportunities to work as a sideman with George Mraz, Benny Golson, and Benny Bailey.

Article

Robert L. Doerschuk

revised by Barry Kernfeld

[Dennis Jay ]

(b Chicago, April 10, 1938). American keyboard player. He grew up in a musical family and received extensive training in classical music, though he was always interested in improvisation. While in high school and at the University of Illinois he frequently spent time in Chicago jazz clubs, playing with such notable musicians as Joe Farrell, Wes Montgomery, Ira Sullivan, Wilbur Ware, Bob Cranshaw, and Johnny Griffin. As a medical student at Johns Hopkins University he performed frequently, concentrating on bop, and while studying at Columbia University in 1963 he took part in an audition for John Hammond, who subsequently produced four albums by Zeitlin’s trio. Later in 1963 Zeitlin moved to the San Francisco area, where he pursued two careers – one in psychiatry and one as a jazz musician. He formed a trio, which from 1964 to 1967 included Charlie Haden. In the late 1960s his experiments with prepared piano led him to use electronic keyboard instruments, but he was again concentrating on piano in the late 1980s, when his trio (consisting of the double bass player Joel DiBartolo and the drummer Peter Donald) moved into the area of lighter mood music known as new age. In the 1990s Zeitlin gave performances as an unaccompanied soloist, with his trio, and in an acclaimed duo with David Friesen; these displayed his thorough grasp of jazz theory, a sense of structure, and mastery of free improvisation. He has written some film scores (notably that for Philip Kaufman’s ...

Article

Wayne Schneider

(b New York, June 13, 1917; d Las Vegas, Jan 31, 2000). American trombonist and bandleader. He played with Les Brown (1940–42), Harry James (1943), Jimmy Dorsey (1944), and various groups in Los Angeles (1944–9); during this period he appeared in the films Seven Days Leave (1942), with Brown, and Lost in a Harem (1944), with Dorsey. He then worked as a studio musician for MGM from 1949 to 1957, when he formed his own band; in the early 1960s Zentner’s was the only newly formed jazz-oriented big band to achieve success. Up a Lazy River (1960, Lib. 55374), an arrangement by Bob Florence of the standard by Hoagy Carmichael and Sidney Arodin, was his biggest hit. The group toured the USA, accompanying such popular singers as Johnny Mathis and Nancy Wilson, and played frequently in Las Vegas. In ...

Article

Wolfram Knauer

(b Lodz, Poland, Dec 17, 1941). German pianist and keyboard player. He took private piano lessons (1948–60) and studied piano and composition in Dresden and Berlin. From the early 1970s he worked as a jazz musician in the East German bands FEZ (1974–7) and Osiris (1977–9), with musicians such as Manfred Hering, Helmut “Joe” Sachse, and Manfred Schulze, and with his own groups; among these are an ensemble of electronics and voice (from 1989), duos with the tuba player Dietrich Unkrodt (from 1980; Duo Unkrodt/Zerbe, 1987, Amiga 856336) and the clarinetist Jürgen Kupke (from 1996), and the Hannes Zerbe Blechband (from 1979), an ensemble consisting of jazz and classical musicians. From the mid-1980s Zerbe has worked extensively with synthesizers and computers, which he has used to further his aim of mediating between the worlds of contemporary composition and free improvisation. He also likes to involve poetry in his performances, as was heard, for example, in concerts given in ...

Article

Erik van den Berg

[the Six Winds]

Dutch saxophone sextet. It was founded in 1984 by the baritone saxophonist Ad Peijnenburg, who added bass and sopranino instruments to the standard saxophone quartet he had established in 1976. After an early version of the group, with Bill Smith (ii) on sopranino saxophone and Paul Termos on the alto instrument (...

Article

Erik Kjellberg

(b Hagfors, Sweden, Sept 20, 1938; d Stockholm, May 12, 2005). Swedish singer. In 1957 she sang with Ib Glindemann’s band in Copenhagen and performed with Arne Domnérus’s orchestra in Stockholm; she made several recordings with Domnérus (from 1958) and also recorded with studio bands of various sizes. In 1959–60 she appeared in Great Britain and the USA. Notable among her recordings are Waltz for Debby (1964, Phi. 08222PL), made with a trio led by Bill Evans (ii); Hej man (1975, Odeon 06235171), recorded under her own name; and It Only Happens Every Time (1977, EMI 06235454), with Thad Jones as leader. Zetterlund’s style is cool but sensitive and shows a genuine sympathy with the jazz idiom, though her repertory includes Swedish classical songs and folksongs. She is also an actress, and has worked in films, television, and the theater, both in drama and comedy. She published ...

Article

Wolfram Knauer

revised by Barry Kernfeld

(b Gliwice, Poland, Feb 20, 1950). Polish flutist and composer. He played violin and piano from the age of six, then studied at the high school of music in Katowice, where he gained diplomas in flute (1972) and composition (1977). Although he was educated in classical music he was also interested in rock, and around 1970 he started to play jazz; he began with experiments in free jazz and only later acquired a knowledge of earlier styles. Having formed a duo with the double bass player Czesław Gladowski, he continued to explore this instrumental combination into the 1980s. Zgraja performed and recorded with Barre Phillips (1975) and with the double bass player Jacek Bednarek (from 1976); he is heard to advantage on La concha (1981, JG 052), recorded in a duo with Bednarek. After the proclamation of martial law in Poland in ...

Article

Gary W. Kennedy

(b New York, April 14, 1945). American drummer. He began playing drums while at school and later studied theory at the Mannes College of Music. After graduation from CCNY in 1969 he moved to California, where from 1970 he appeared as a freelance with, among others, Ron McClure, Steve Swallow, Art Lande, Mike Nock, and Mel Martin, and worked regularly with Vince Guaraldi. In 1974 he returned to New York and performed in the Persian Room at the Plaza Hotel. Zigmund played drums with Bill Evans (ii) from January 1975 through 1977, and occasionally afterwards until November 1978. During his tenure with Evans he worked in a short-lived trio with Eddie Gomez and Bennie Wallace and recorded under Gomez’s leadership (1976). He then joined Richard Beirach’s trio Eon and worked as a freelance in Jim Hall’s trio (alongside Harvie Swartz), as well as with Chet Baker, Stan Getz, and others. He toured Japan in Fred Hersch’s trio with Red Mitchell in ...

Article

Gary W. Kennedy

[Corujo de Magalhàes Alves, Carlos ]

(b Lisbon, Dec 15, 1948). Portuguese violinist. He studied classical music at a conservatory in Lisbon (c1953–1965) and learned organ at a school of sacred music (1967–8). During the 1960s he was a member of a chamber orchestra at Lisbon University, and in 1967 he founded the group Plexus, which explored a fusion of rock, contemporary classical music, and improvisation. Following a period in the Portuguese Army, in 1975 he studied graphic art and stage design at a theater school in Lisbon, and from 1974 to 1980 he served as the music director for a theater company, Comicos; later he founded an art gallery of the same name in which he displayed his own works. He also wrote for the theater, and in 1988 he collaborated on an Italian production of a trilogy by Franz Kafka.

Zingaro performed free jazz and improvised music throughout Europe with Daunik Lazro (from ...

Article

Article

David Flanagan

revised by Géza Gábor Simon and Barry Kernfeld

(Cornelius )

(b Visegrad, nr Budapest, June 13, 1927; d Townshend, VT, Jan 26, 1998). Hungarian guitarist. He grew up in a musical family and first studied violin and trumpet; he changed to guitar when he decided to make music his career. After playing in Budapest with Mihály Tabányi’s Pinocchio Ensemble (1946–8) he performed and recorded in Vienna, where he had spent a brief period as a double bass player in a pit orchestra, with Vera Auer (1948–54). In Frankfurt he played bop with Jutta Hipp (1954–5), whose group also included Auer. He followed Hipp to the USA early in 1956, but soon returned to Germany, where he worked with Hans Koller (April 1956–1959) and visiting American musicians, notably Oscar Pettiford (he occasionally played double bass while Pettiford played cello). In 1959 he was awarded a scholarship to the Lenox School of Jazz and moved to the USA. Following a short period with Chico Hamilton (...

Article

Howard Rye

Record label. It was founded in 1899 by Frank Seamon and was continued by Victor after that company took over Seamon’s National Gramophone Corporation. After 1910 the name was not used in the USA, but it remained in use in Britain (and was later also adopted in Australia) as the Gramophone Company’s cheap label. Much of the repertory was recorded in Britain and includes some of the most highly regarded British hot dance music of the 1920s; the catalogue also contained American material recorded by Victor. Following the setting up of EMI, Zonophone was merged in ...

Article

Walter Ojakäär

(Nikolayevich )

(b Moscow, Nov 15, 1936). Russian saxophonist and composer. Self-taught as a musician, he played clarinet in the brass band of the Moscow M. V. Lomonosov State University, where he studied physics (graduating in 1958), and tenor saxophone in the big band of the Tsentral’ny Dom Rabotnikov Iskusstva (Central house of artists; 1954–7). In 1956 he joined the octet Vosmoyrka, at that time the best jazz group in Moscow. Later he was a member of Oleg Lundstrem’s orchestra (1960–65) and the Kontsertny Estradny Orkestr Tsentral’novo TV i Vsesoyuznovo Radio (Concert variety orchestra of central TV and all-union radio). In 1967–8 he led two groups known by the name Crescendo – a quintet in which the vibraphonist Leonid Garin played in 1968 and a quartet. From 1974 to 1979 he worked with the ensemble Melodiya, and in the 1980s he was active as a freelance and wrote film music. In ...

Article

Adriano Mazzoletti

(b Spilimbergo, Italy, 1911; d Asti, Italy, c1977). Italian guitarist and leader. He played guitar from the age of six. In 1934 he recorded as an unaccompanied soloist and in 1938 formed a group that later became the Quintetto Ritmico di Milano; this was modeled after the Quintette du Hot Club de France and included three guitars (of which Zuccheri played the lead), a violin (from ...

Article

Jacques Aboucaya

[Z, Bojan ]

(b Belgrade, Feb 2, 1968). Serbian pianist and composer. He discovered jazz in 1984 and quickly became one of the busiest pianists in Belgrade. After gaining a scholarship to the University of Michigan (1986) he spent time with Clare Fischer, under whose influence he renewed his approach to the piano. In the course of his service in the Serbian army (1987) he directed an ethnic music orchestra, and this supplied further inspiration for his music making. In 1988 he settled in Paris, where in the early 1990s he played in Noël Akchoté’s groups Trash Corporation and Unit and in 1992 founded Quartet Z. He joined Henri Texier’s Azur Quartet (1992) and Sonjal Septet (1996), played in Sylvain Beuf’s quartet, formed an international group including, most notably, Julien Lourau, and appeared at the festival Banlieues Bleues (1997), where he presented ...

Article

Ken Rattenbury

revised by Barry Kernfeld

[Robert Albert; Zukowski, Bogusław Albert]

(b Detroit, Jan 17, 1912; d Los Angeles, Feb 16, 1944). American pianist and composer. At an early age he displayed a precocious talent for playing piano in an assertive, confident style influenced by the blues. He worked in Philadelphia as a member of an orchestra led by the pianist Oliver Naylor, recording in 1925 and appearing at the Palace d’Or and the Orient restaurant in the late 1920s and early 1930s; he also spent a period with the Playboys, led by the double bass player Thelma Terry (recording in 1928). After performing with the singer Seymour Simons and at Smokey’s Club in Detroit he came to prominence as a member of Bob Crosby’s band (late 1936 – mid-1939), in which he was Joe Sullivan’s replacement; while with Crosby he gained recognition as a leading exponent of the boogie-woogie style, and in 1939 he was named “best pianist” by ...