701-720 of 57,944 results

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(b New York, NY, Oct 1, 1948). American lyricist. She has collaborated frequently with Stephen Flaherty.

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John Morgan and Roswitha Sperber

(b Berlin, Feb 19, 1936). German composer and organist. She had her first music lessons from her father, Joseph Ahrens, with whom she continued organ studies at the Berlin Hochschule für Musik, where her composition teacher was Boris Blacher. Subsequently she studied with Messiaen and Milhaud at the Paris Conservatoire. She made her début as an organist in ...

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Noël Goodwin

(b Leningrad [now St Petersburg], May 13, 1932; d Cologne, Oct 31, 2002). Israeli conductor of Soviet birth. He studied at the Leningrad Central School of Music and the Leningrad Conservatory, and also with Natan Rakhlin and Kurt Sanderling. In 1956 he was appointed conductor of the Saratov PO; he also taught at the conservatory there and conducted his first operas. The next year he became conductor at Yaroslav, remaining there until his appointment as chief conductor of the Moscow RSO in ...

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Ahuli  

Victoria Lindsay Levine

Water drum of the Cherokee people of the southern USA. The body is normally made of wood (preferably red cedar) about 28 cm tall and 20 cm in diameter, with walls 3 or 4 cm thick, but an earthenware crock can also be used. It is filled with about 5 cm of water before the head is stretched across the opening. The head is made of woodchuck skin, tanned deerskin, or a rubber tire inner-tube, and is attached by a wooden or metal hoop. The drum is played with a single stick made of hickory wood about 30 cm long with a carved knob on the end. The drummer alters the sound by shaking the drum or turning it upside down, thereby moistening the head. Male song leaders play water drums to accompany certain communal dances performed at ceremonial grounds. Water drums also accompany ceremonial dances of the Delaware, Muscogee (Creek), Shawnee, and Yuchi (Euchee), and were used in the past by the Chickasaw and Choctaw. Each tribe has its own name for the water drum, for example Creek, ...

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Large box-resonated lamellaphone of Ghana; it has three to five metal tongues.

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Aibl  

Karl Ventzke

German firm of music publishers. The lithographer Joseph Aibl (b Munich, 1802; d Munich, 1834), a pupil of Theobald Boehm, worked from 1819 to 1825 in Berne as a musician and later as a lithographer with a music dealer. In 1825 he founded a business that published music and dealt in instruments in Munich; after his death it was continued by his widow and from ...

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Siegfried Gmeinwieser

(b Wasserburg am Inn, Feb 23, 1779; d Munich, May 6, 1867). German composer. Although his first contact with music may well have been through the choirmaster of St Jakob in Wasserburg, Johann Sebastian Dietz (1711—93), Aiblinger received his first musical training at the Benedictine Abbey at Tegernsee. In ...

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Marie Louise Göllner

(b ?Aachen; d Cologne, c1528–30). German printer. He came into possession of the Lupus Press in Cologne through marriage to its owner, Ida Grutter, and began publishing in 1512 or 1513. He brought out some 35 works on a variety of subjects before his death. The business was continued by his widow and son-in-law, Laurenz von der Mülen, until his son Johann von Aich was old enough to take it over. Under the latter’s direction some 35 more books were issued from the Lupus Press, the last of them dated ...

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William E. Hettrick

(b Regensburg, 1564–5; d Augsburg, 20–21 Jan 1628). German composer and organist. He ranks with Hans Leo Hassler among the most important and prolific composers in southern Germany in the late 16th and early 17th centuries.

Aichinger’s birthdate is derived from the inscription on his tombstone in the cloister of Augsburg Cathedral; his age at his death is given as 63. He was still at Regensburg in ...

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Aida  

Roger Parker

Opera in four acts by giuseppe Verdi to a libretto by antonio Ghislanzoni after a scenario by Auguste Mariette; Cairo, Opera House, 24 December 1871.

During the late 1860s the search for suitable librettos began to cause Verdi increasing problems. One of his most active helpers was the French librettist and impresario ...

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Richard Langham Smith

(‘The Young Eagle’). Drame musical in five acts by Arthur Honegger and Jacques Ibert to a libretto by Henri Cain after Edmond Rostand’s play; Monte Carlo, Opéra, 10 March 1937.

It was the first of two stage works by Honegger and Ibert (the other being an operetta, ...

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Alfred Reichling

(b Gasteig, nr Sterzing, March 15, 1809; d Marling, nr Meran [Merano], Jan 2, 1887). Tyrolean organ builder. His earliest known work was the organ for Navis (1837; lost). Among his numerous other organs are those at Absam (1841; in an organ case by Johann Anton Fuchs, ...

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(b ?Orzivecchi or Orzinuovi, nr Brescia, c1520; fl 1562–81). Italian theorist and Franciscan friar. He was influenced by Pietro Aaron, to whom he referred as ‘my indisputable teacher’, by Spataro and by Marchetto da Padova. His Illuminata de tutti i tuoni di canto fermo...

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Howard Rye

(bCharleston, SC, July 26, 1902 or 1903; dNew York, April 1973). Trumpeter. He was unsure of his year of birth (his social security file gives 1903), and he was brought up in the Jenkins Orphanage in Charleston, South Carolina, where he received extensive musical tuition and toured with the orphanage bands. In about ...

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Vincent J. Novara

(b Goffstown, NH, March 13, 1818; d College Hill, OH, Oct 4, 1882). American music educator. He was born into a musical family and graduated from Dartmouth College (BA 1838). He then journeyed west conducting singing schools, eventually settling in Cincinnati in ...

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Howard Niblock

(b Savannah, GA, Aug 5, 1889; d Savannah, GA, Aug 17, 1973). American poet. A prolific writer throughout most of his long career, he produced thirty-three volumes of poetry, five novels, five short story collections, two books of criticism, and a play. When Aiken was eleven years of age, his father killed his mother and then himself, and he spent the rest of his childhood with an aunt in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He became an admirer of Freud, and his works often stress psychological themes. Other influences include T. S. Eliot (a fellow student at Harvard) and Emily Dickinson (whose ...

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Paul G. Hammond

(b Chester Co., PA, March 5, 1808; d Montgomery Co., PA, 1900). American tune book compiler. He introduced a system of seven-shape notation in The Christian Minstrel (Philadelphia, 1846; for illustration see Shape-note hymnody, ex.2), a tune book containing many pieces found in the publications of Lowell Mason. The book underwent one revision and at least 171 reprintings by ...

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Susan Au

(b Rogers, TX, Jan 5, 1931; d New York, Dec 1, 1989). American dancer, choreographer, and dance company director. He began to study dance at Lester Horton’s studio in Los Angeles in 1949 and went to the East Coast as a member of Horton’s dance company in ...

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Richard Wigmore

( b Lyon, Sept 9, 1957). French pianist . He studied at the Paris Conservatoire, where he won four premiers prix, and continued his studies with Yvonne Loriod and Maria Curcio. Since winning first prize in the 1973 Messiaen Competition he has been closely asssociated with Messiaen's music, performing all of the composer's works for piano and making a widely praised recording of the ...

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Theodore Karp

(b c1175; d c1230). Provençal troubadour. According to his vida, he was the son of a Toulouse cloth merchant (Peguilhan is a village in the Haute Garonne, near Saint Gaudens). He was apparently a wanderer who was received at many courts in southern France, Spain and northern Italy. Raimon V of Toulouse may have been his first patron, while others may have included Guilhem de Bergadan, Gaston VI of Béarn, Bernard IV of Comminges, Pedro II of Aragon, Alfonso VIII of Castile, Guillaume IV of Montferrat, Marquis Guilhem of Malaspina and Azzo VI and Beatrice d'Este. Aimeric's poetry, which includes chansons, sirventes, ...