741-760 of 57,944 results

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Patrick Macey, Jeremy Noble, Jeffrey Dean and Gustave Reese

In 

See Josquin (Lebloitte dit) des Prez

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Aiyam  

J. Richard Haefer

Vessel rattle of the Yoeme Yaqui maso (deer dancer) of Arizona and Northern Mexico and their Mayo neighbours. One is held in each hand. They are made from gourds about 15 cm in diameter but of slightly different sizes and shapes to give different sounds to the various movements of the deer. The inside of the gourd is scraped clean and small pebbles are placed inside. A cottonwood handle about 15 cm long is inserted into the base of the gourd, which is neither painted nor decorated....

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Àjà  

Amanda Villepastour

A generic term for metal clapper bells of the Yorùbá people of Nigeria and Benin. The bells, which can be of iron or brass and of variable sizes, have an integral handle. Their most common use is in òrìṣà cults where the àjà punctuates prayers and incantations arhythmically and is believed to invoke the deities...

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Ajaeng  

Robert C. Provine

Bowed long zither of Korea. Two main versions are in current use: the ajaeng, which has been a member of court music ensembles for many centuries, and the smaller sanjo ajaeng, invented in the 1940s and used for folk music and accompaniments.

The older version is about 160 cm long and 24 cm wide, has seven strings of twisted silk and is bowed with a long (65 cm) resined stick of forsythia wood. The instrument itself is made of paulownia wood and is played propped up at the bowing end (performer’s right) on a small four-legged stand. The strings run from a gently curved bridge on the right across seven small movable wooden bridges (‘wild-goose feet’) to another curved bridge on the left; the sounding length, from the right bridge to the movable bridge, is different for each string and readily adjustable for tuning purposes. The ...

Article

Ajax  

Howard Rye

Record company and label. The company was established by the Compo Company of Lachine, Canada, which marketed records through its subsidiary, the Ajax Record Company of Chicago. Although the label name was registered as a trademark in 1921, issue is not thought to have begun until ...

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Aje  

Barbara B. Smith and Jessica A. Schwartz

Single-headed Hourglass drum of the Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia. Most descriptions indicate that it was introduced from Melanesia, possibly through Pohnpei, where the Aip resembles it in structure. The long-waisted body (about 65 cm tall, diameter at the ends 20 cm) is crafted from breadfruit wood. The head, made from the inner lining of the stomach or bladder of a shark, is tied over one end by a cord of fibrous plant material. The drum is held on the lap or under the left arm. Finger and hand strokes, and playing positions (centre or rim), are differentiated. One, two, or three ...

Article

Amanda Villepastour

The largest gourd rattle in the Sẹ̀kẹ̀rẹ̀ family of instruments of the Yorùbá people of Nigeria and Benin. The gourd resonator is encased in a net to which cowrie-shell and sometimes glass bead strikers are attached. The rattle was once associated with the worship of Ajé, the Yorùbá ...

Article

Ajigo  

K.A. Gourlay

Kettledrum of the Idoma people of Nigeria. It is approximately 60 cm tall and 35 cm in diameter, and has a head affixed by wedge bracing (i.e. tension is obtained by inserting wooden wedges between the securing ring and the body). The ajigo is played with the hands. Believed to be sacred, it is used solely by members of the ...

Article

William Ashbrook

Melodramma giocoso in two acts by Gaetano Donizetti to a libretto by Jacopo Ferretti after Giovanni Giraud’s L’ajo nell’imbarazzo (1807, Rome); Rome, Teatro Valle, 4 February 1824 (revised as Don Gregorio, Naples, Teatro Nuovo, 11 June 1826).

This was the first sustained success of Donizetti’s career. A father, Marchese Giulio (baritone), having been maltreated by a woman, insists that his two sons grow up without knowing any females. Their tutor, Don Gregorio (...

Article

Peter Cooke

Large pentatonic log xylophone formerly played in the royal compound of the kabaka (King) of Buganda, central Uganda. Like other xylophones in Uganda the bars were preferably carved from logs of the lusambya tree (markhamia platycalyx). Their number varies between 17 and 22 and they are laid across freshly felled banana trunks and held in place by tall sticks pushed into the trunks between the bars. The bars are sounded at both ends with heavy beaters but are held longitudinally in place by a pair of shoulders carved out of the underside of each bar which trap the bars between the trunks yet allow free vibration....

Article

Idiochord single-string stick zither made by Ganda children in Uganda. It consists of a piece of papyrus stem about 55 cm long with a thin strip raised and supported on bits of papyrus that serve as bridges. It is plucked either with a finger of the right hand or with a small stick....

Article

Akaene  

Gourd vessel rattle of the Teso people of Uganda. It is filled with pebbles or dried peas, and used to accompany songs for healing or rain-making.

Article

Mark Gilbert

(b Sendai, Japan, March 16, 1953). Japanese pianist and keyboard player. He grew up in Cleveland and studied piano, theory, and music history at the Cleveland Music School Settlement (1959–65). In his early teens he returned to Japan, where he read philosophy and composition at the International Christian University in Tokyo (...

Article

Peter Cooke

Flat box-shaped rattle of the Nkore people of western Uganda. The top and bottom of the box are made from two rafts of reeds laced together with thin sticks between them at the edges to hold them apart, leaving room between for dry seeds that rattle when the box is swung rhythmically from side to side and simultaneously tapped on the top by the player’s thumbs. The sides are covered with strips of banana fibre or cloth, stitched to prevent the seeds from escaping. Vernacular names among neighbouring peoples are ...

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Akama  

Single-headed drum of the Igbo people of Nigeria.

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Akanono  

Single-headed conical drum of the Lala people of Zambia. It is beaten by hand, by a male performer, and usually played in conjunction with the cimbulunge and fwanda-fwanda drums.

See also Cimbulunge ; Fwanda-fwanda .

Article

Single-string fiddle of the Makonde people of the Ruvuma region of the United Republic of Tanzania.

Article

Dimitri Conomos

In the Byzantine rite, an anonymous Kontakion chanted in honour of the Virgin and performed while the congregation stands. The Akathistos possibly dates from the 6th century and continued in use despite the liturgical changes of the 8th century when the performance of entire kontakia...

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Akayau  

K.A. Gourlay and Jeremy Montagu

Iron ankle rattle of the Hausa people of Nigeria. The Angas equivalent is the zye-zye. A piece of sheet iron is hammered to form a trough about 12 cm long, with the ends narrowed and folded back to form closed hooks into which iron rings are fitted. A string passed through two holes punched through the back of the trough enables two or three rattles to be strung together and worn on the ankles for dancing....

Article

Razia Sultanova

(b Tashkent, March 1, 1921). Uzbek composer. After graduating from the Tashkent Conservatory (1945) where he was a pupil of Vasilenko Revutsky and A. Koslovsky, he took a postgraduate course under Steinberg and Voloshinov at the Leningrad Conservatory (1945–54). His lyrical and dramatic style is rooted in Uzbek traditional music; a number of his works reflect his interest in history, philosophy and poetry....