761-780 of 57,944 results

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Akbele  

Aerophone of the Igbo people of Nigeria; the term may refer to an ivory or gourd trumpet or a long calabash flute.

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André Clergeat

(b Paris, Dec 7, 1968). French guitarist, leader, and composer. He studied guitar under the guidance of Philippe Petit and Marc Ducret and was influenced by the avant-garde musicians Derek Bailey and John Zorn. After having played alongside John Abercrombie, Tal Farlow, and Dave Liebman he abandoned bop, oriented himself “beyond” jazz, and adopted a violent “jungle style,” which had nothing to do with Duke Ellington’s aesthetic of the same name but borrowed instead mainly from electronics. In the early 1990s he founded the groups Unit (including Julien Lourau) and Trash Corporation (involving Bojan Zulfikarpasic), played in the cooperative Astrolab, and appeared frequently in Henri Texier’s group. Later he joined the groups Machination (alongside Hélène Labarrière), Tribulation, and the Recyclers, and led the ensemble M.A.O. Akchoté has taught at the Centre d’Information Musicale and at EDIM (Enseignement Diffusion Information Musique)....

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Ferdinand J. de Hen

Long drum of the Alur people of the northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. The single lizard-skin head is glued to the narrow wooden body and is beaten by hand. It is used in witchcraft ceremonies.

O. Boone: Les tambours du Congo belge et due Ruanda-Urundi...

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Kathleen Dale and Axel Helmer

(b Stockholm, Jan 19, 1860; d Stockholm, Jan 20, 1938). Swedish composer, organist and conductor. He attended the Swedish Royal Academy of Music (1882–6), studying counterpoint and composition with J. Dente, and was a pupil of Franck in Paris (1887–8...

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Bengt Kyhlberg and Göran Grahn

(b April 28, 1826; d July 2, 1876). Swedish organ builder. He began his training about 1844 as a pupil of Johan Samuel Strand at Västra Vingåker, and attended the Tekniska Institutet in Stockholm (1847–50). Later he worked with the Stockholm organ builders Blomquist & Lindgren and Gustaf Andersson. After gaining the organ builder’s charter in ...

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(fl 1684–1706). English violinist and composer. Someone of this name was living in the parish of St Giles-in-the-Fields, London, in 1686. He is listed among the king's musicians between 1687 and 1691, in which year he was in the party that accompanied King William to Holland. Thereafter he does not appear in the Lord Chamberlain’s records, but he was admitted a wait of the City of London in ...

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Horace Clarence Boyer

(b Brookfield, MO, May 21, 1923; d July 26, 1995). American gospel singer, pianist and composer. She began piano lessons when she was five and by the age of ten was playing for her church choir. She started to compose while still in her teens. Later she moved to California and formed the Simmons-Akers Singers, with whom she remained until the mid-1950s. Thereafter she served as music director for various white congregations, composing and performing in a style more closely associated with white gospel. She was therefore only modestly successful in black gospel circles, although many of her compositions are standards among black singers, including ...

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(b Bol′shoy Fontan, nr Odessa, 11/June 23, 1889; d Domodedovo, nr Moscow, March 5, 1966). Russian poet. Her first collection appeared in 1912 and it was around this time that she attended the Brodyachyaya sobaka (‘Stray Dog’) cabaret where became acquainted with Velemir Khlebnikov, Mikhail Kuzmin (a poet and composer), Mayakovsky and Artur Lourié. The latter became the first composer to use her verses: in ...

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Tim Page

Opera in three acts by Philip Glass to a libretto by the composer, Shalom Goldman, Robert Israel and Richard Riddell; Stuttgart, Staatsoper, 24 March 1984.

Glass has called Einstein on the Beach, Satyagraha and Akhnaten a trilogy of ‘portrait’ operas. From a purely dramatic standpoint such a grouping makes sense, although all of the composer’s later operas bear closer musical resemblance to ...

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Amelia Maciszewski

(b Faizabad, Uttar Pradesh, 1911–14; d Lucknow, 1974/5). North Indian vocalist. She was hailed as a child prodigy by Gauhar Jan, who heard her sing at her school in about 1919. Akhtari's mother then took her to study classical vocal music with Ustad Zamir Khan of Gaya, Bihar. Akhtari made her début as a vocalist at a charity concert in Patna. Subsequently she moved to Calcutta and underwent arduous classical vocal training as a disciple of Ustad Ata Hussein Khan of the Patiala ...

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Akidi  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Board zither of the northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has a single string that passes five times back and forth along a board from notches carved in both ends, with a small stick at each end serving as a nut, and small movable wooden blocks under each length of string to tune them. The name ...

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(b Pisky, near Khar′kiv, 8/Sept 20, 1876; d Paris, Jan 8, 1945). Ukrainian composer and pianist. Aged ten he was sent, along with his brother Yakiv (later known as the composer Stepovy), to sing in the choir of the Imperial Chapel in St Petersburg. It was during his time there (...

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Akiri  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Handheld bell of the Bandia of the Buta district, northern Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is made from the hard shell of borassus palm fruit. One end is sawn off and two short lengths of stick are hung inside as clappers. The bell is similar in shape and size to cowbells used elsewhere in the world. It is used in traditional dance music, together with ...

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Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, Jan 17, 1955). Japanese guitarist. Self-taught, he took up drums at the age of eight and guitar when he was ten. In 1975 he made his professional début with Isao Suzuki’s group Soul Family. He performed with Mikio Masuda, Motohiko Hino, Hiroshi Murakami, Yoshio Suzuki (...

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J. Bradford Robinson

(b Dairen, China, Dec 12, 1929). Japanese jazz composer, pianist and bandleader. She studied classical music and turned to jazz only in 1947 after moving to Japan. There she was discovered by Oscar Peterson, who urged her to take up a career in the USA. After studying at Berklee College of Music (...

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Barry Kernfeld

(bDetroit, 27 Jan 1955). Americandrummer. Ak Laff, ak Laff, aKlaff, and akLaff are among numerous variant spellings of his name found in the jazz literature and on recordings; by his own account the preferred spelling is akLaff. He was captivated by percussion from an early age and practiced on various instruments before acquiring a set of drums at the age of 15. He studied speech and drama at Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti (...

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Akofe  

Animal-horn trumpet of the Ewe people of Ghana.

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Edward V. Williams and Christian Troelsgård

Handbooks transmitting the 14th- and 15th-century chant melodies of the Byzantine rite. Alternative names are anthologion anoixantarion, anthologia, psaltikē and mousikon. Akolouthiai manuscripts contain within a single volume a collection of monophonic chants, both Ordinary and Proper, for the psalmody of Hesperinos and Orthros, and settings for the three Divine Liturgies (...

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Ferdinand J. de Hen

Xylophone of the Bandia people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has six to ten loose bars placed across two parallel tree (usually banana) trunks laid on the ground. Sometimes it is placed over a pit to increase the sonority. It is played only by men....

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Term of the Igbo people of Nigeria for clappers or a single-headed drum.