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Andrew Lamb

[Winterfeld, Max]

(b Hamburg, Feb 11, 1879; d Buenos Aires, Dec 20, 1942). German composer and conductor. As a child he took piano lessons and later studied music in Kiel, Sondershausen and Berlin. He began his professional career in 1897 as a theatre conductor in Bremerhaven, moved to Hamburg in 1898 and, after military service, to Berlin in 1902. He adopted his nom de plume for his first operetta, Das Jungfernstift (1901). He conducted with a touring circus and at provincial theatres, and achieved wide and lasting success with his operetta Die keusche Susanne (1910). He then returned to Berlin as conductor and composer to the Thalia-Theater and produced a rapid succession of operettas – he was to compose more than 50 in all – in the lively, commercial style of the Berlin school, among them Polnische Wirtschaft (1910), Autoliebchen (1912), Die elfte Muse...

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(b Seville, Oct 10, 1854; d Madrid, Feb 19, 1923). Spanish composer and conductor. He studied music first with his father and then the violin with Salvador Viniegra. At the age of 12 he joined the orchestra of the Teatro Principal in Seville as a first violinist and at 17 became director of the Opera. Receiving a scholarship from the Diputación of Cádiz, he went to the Paris Conservatoire, where he studied with Alard, Savart and Thomas, winning first prizes in harmony and counterpoint in 1877. After travelling in Italy, he became director of the Teatro Apolo in Madrid in 1885, then of the Teatro de la Zarzuela, where he gave the first performance in Spain of Bizet’s Carmen. He was also director of the Unión Artístico-Musical and the Madrid Concert Society, where he introduced works from the Classical German repertory and modern French and Russian compositions. He wrote orchestral and instrumental music, but his chief interest was the zarzuela, especially the ...

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(b London, March 7, 1908; d Gosport, Aug 3, 1998). English jazz trumpeter, singer and bandleader. He performed and recorded with the dance bands of Billy Cotton (1929–33), Roy Fox (1931–2), Ray Noble (1931, 1933–4) and Lew Stone (1932–5); Georgia on my mind (1932), recorded with Fox, is a good example of his playing and singing and became extremely popular. From 1932 he worked as a leader in a style heavily influenced by that of Louis Armstrong; his band, the Georgians (1934–9), included his brother Bruts Gonella (b 1911), who was also a trumpeter. During a visit to New York in 1939 Gonella recorded with John Kirby and performed at the Hickory House. After returning to London he led the New Georgians from 1940 to 1942, but worked less frequently in the late 1940s and early 50s. In ...

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David Ades

(b Plymouth, Feb 17, 1925; d London, Jan 8, 2003). English arranger, composer and conductor. Originally a trumpeter, then a music copyist, his main musical career took off in the 1950s with radio shows and recordings accompanying singers, culminating in a series of distinctive LPs with his own concert orchestra. Goodwin's musical accompaniments for the Parlophone LPs by Peter Sellers greatly contributed to their success. He also showed a talent for composing; early successes included Jet Journey, Skiffling Strings (renamed Swinging Sweethearts for the USA), and Lingering Lovers. In later years he wrote several major works, notably his suites Drake 400 (1980) and New Zealand (1983), the latter reflecting his love of the country to which he regularly returned for concert tours. A prolific film composer, he is widely known for his score for 633 Squadron, closely followed by Those Magnificent Men in their Flying Machines...

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David Ades

(b London, 1911; d Dublin, Oct 6, 1982). English arranger, composer and conductor. At the age of 19 Green was the youngest musical director in London's West End, and his first recordings were for EMI in 1933. Before World War II he was closely involved in commercial radio, and after the war many of his works became familiar radio and television themes, for example that of ‘Meet the Huggetts’. He was one of the most prolific musicians in his field, responsible for hundreds of recordings and over 150 film scores. Many of Green's own works were written specifically for those publishers who served the requirements of radio, television and films, such as Chappell, Francis, Day & Hunter, Paxton and Photoplay. He began writing film scores when Romance was chosen by Menuhin for the theme of The Magic Bow (1946). Often writing under pseudonyms, his biggest international success was as ‘Jose Belmonte’ with ...

Article

Thomas L. Gayda

[Will; Williams, Hugh; Milos, André]

(b Vienna, Aug 11, 1894; d New York, Dec 10, 1939). Austrian composer, pianist and conductor. Born into a Jewish family of jewellers, he studied with the operetta composer Richard Heuberger, Robert Fuchs, the musicologist Guido Adler and Franz Schreker. After he left the Vienna Music Academy in 1919, his Zwei phantastische Stücke was given its first performance by the Vienna PO. The following year he received a doctorate in music from Vienna University. While he remained initially faithful to the late-Romantic, Impressionist line, he became the first Austrian composer to introduce jazz idioms into his music. His grotesque ballet-pantomime Baby in der Bar (1928) marked him as one of the prime exponents of the Zeitgeist of the Weimar era.

In 1927 Grosz moved to Berlin and became the artistic director of the new Ultraphon record company, quickly building up its catalogue as a conductor, arranger and pianist. He formed a well-known piano duo with Wilhelm Kauffman and toured Europe as a highly-sought accompanist and conductor. When the National Socialists seized power in ...

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Kate Daubney

(George )

(b New York, Feb 13, 1908; d Los Angeles, April 24, 1971). American musical director, conductor and arranger. He began his career as a pianist, playing and arranging for jazz artists, in particular for the Paul Whiteman Orchestra in the late 1920s. His arrangements of classic songs for Whiteman, such as Nobody's Sweetheart, are considered among the finest of their era, blending jazz instruments with those of the traditional orchestra. His later arrangement of Star Dust provided a hit in the early 1940s for clarinettist Artie Shaw. In 1940 he became musical director for Metro Goldwyn Mayer studios before moving to Twentieth Century-Fox in 1953. He was involved in arranging scores for a number of films and musicals including The Harvey Girls (1945) and The Pirate (1948); the arrangements reflect the complexity achieved in his work for Whiteman, although film music had only recently incorporated jazz into its idioms. He was nominated for Academy Awards for his work on several notable musicals, including ...

Article

Brian Priestley

revised by Alyn Shipton

[Edward]

(b London, March 30, 1900; d Virginia Water, nr Egham, Nov 18, 1969). English trombonist and bandleader. He studied the tenor horn with his father before taking up the trombone. After a period as a street musician (until 1922), he became a regular sideman with several prominent British dance bands, notably those of Bert Ambrose (1928–36), Sydney Lipton (1936–9), Geraldo (1939–44) and Jack Hylton. Though not a strong jazz soloist, Heath seized the chance in 1944 to form his own band, which made regular broadcasts, gave the ‘Swing Sessions’ concerts at the London Palladium and soon began to tour frequently. Employing the very best section players, Heath successfully emulated the precision and versatility of such American bandleaders as Tommy Dorsey and Woody Herman (American musicians were banned from performing in Britain from 1935 to 1956). The many jazzmen who worked with him included Kenny Baker, Jack Parnell, and (consecutively) Ronnie Scott, Tommy Whittle, Danny Moss and Don Rendell; he also commissioned such enterprising arrangers as John Dankworth, Tadd Dameron (briefly in ...

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Kate Daubney

(b Haverstraw, NY, Aug 25, 1908; d Los Angeles, Feb 3, 1980). American musical director, orchestrator and conductor. His association with cinema music began as a young man with employment as a pianist and organist for a silent movie theatre in Mechanicsville, New York. He became a protégé of Leo Forbstein, the first musical director at Warner Brothers' studios, after helping with the scoring of the first sound film, The Jazz Singer (1927). He effectively served his apprenticeship with Warner Brothers, rising through the music department as a performer and orchestrator-arranger. During this period he orchestrated for Steiner on Daughters Courageous (1939). When Forbstein retired in 1947, Heindorf succeeded him, remaining as head of the department until 1959, although he continued to conduct and arrange scores. He was nominated for 18 Academy Awards between 1942 and 1968, and received three: for the musical direction on ...

Article

Steven Ledbetter

(August)

(b Dublin, Feb 1, 1859; d New York, May 26, 1924). American composer, conductor and cellist of Irish birth. He was the most talented and successful American operetta composer and important also as an advocate of copyright and performance-rights protection for composers.

Herbert’s father died when the boy was an infant, and he grew up in London with his maternal grandfather, the celebrated Irish novelist, poet and composer Samuel Lover (1798–1868). In 1866 Fanny Lover Herbert married a German physician; the family settled in Stuttgart, where Victor received musical training as well as a strong liberal education. He retained a lasting pride in his Irish (Protestant) heritage, reflected in many of his operettas.

He turned to music when financial difficulties prevented him from pursuing medicine, studied the cello with Bernhard Cossmann (1874–6), then entered the Stuttgart Conservatory, where he studied with Max Seifritz. He spent a year in the orchestra of the wealthy Russian Baron Paul von Derwies and another year in Vienna as soloist with the orchestra of Eduard Strauss, who had succeeded his brother Johann. In the light of his operetta work, the time in Vienna must be regarded as a significant formative experience. In ...