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Andrew Hughes and Randall Rosenfeld

(b ?before 1200; d Saxony, ?1272). English Franciscan theologian. He has been falsely identified with Bartholomeus de Glanvilla (fl late 13th century). He studied at Oxford and later at Paris, where he was incepted as a regent master; he joined the Franciscans about ...

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Kurt von Fischer

(fl Florence, c1330–60). Italian composer. In Filippo Villani’s chronicle Bartholus (and not Giovanni da Cascia, as given in Galletti; the chronicle is also ed. G. Tanturli, Padua, 1997) is mentioned together with Lorenzo da Firenze. Villani wrote that Bartholus had introduced in Florence Cathedral a Credo which was performed with voices (...

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Andrew Hughes

(d 1286). ?French poet and priest. He was a canon and priest of the collegiate church of St Pierre in Lille, near Arras. About 1280, he wrote a metrical and rhymed paraphrase of the famous poem, Anticlaudianus, by the 12th-century theologian, philosopher and poet ...

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Katherine Bergeron

(b Reims, mid-14th century; d 1397–8). French harpist and organist. He was musician to Philip the Bold of Burgundy and may be identifiable with Baude Cordier.

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Name formerly assumed to be that of the comtessa de Dia .

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(d ?Westminster, London, reported between May 3, 1459 and May 22, 1460). English composer. The unusually wide distribution of works ascribed to him and the existence of contrary ascriptions to Du Fay, Dunstaple (two works) and Frye suggest that he was a composer of some stature. In ...

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Family who in the 9th century, according to tradition, invented the Tiberian system of Hebrew Ekphonetic notation. See also Jewish music, §III, 2, (ii).

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David Hiley

(dc1193). Benedictine abbot and composer. He was a monk, and later chancellor (1174) and prior (1175), of the cathedral priory of Christ Church, Canterbury, and was appointed abbot of Peterborough in 1177. A friend of Archbishop Thomas Becket, whose murder he may have witnessed, he composed the rhymed monastic office of St Thomas of Canterbury (...

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Benoit  

Pamela F. Starr

(fl 1436–55). French singer and composer. He was probably from the archdiocese of Sens in Haute-Bourgogne. His works appear in 15th-century musical sources under the name Benoit, but an authoritative papal document identifies him as Benedictus Sirede. He is first documented in 1436–7...

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Kurt von Fischer

(fl 14th century). ?French composer. Only the top voice of a Credo by him survives, in the fragment GB-Ob Can.pat.lat.229 (no.5) from Padua. The beginning of its melody is similar to that of a Credo in I-IV 115, whose tenor bears the designation ‘Tenor Guayrinet’ (...

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Mary Berry

(b Fontaines-lès-Dijon, 1090; d Clairvaux, 1153). French theologian, reformer and mystic. He was educated at Châtillon by the canons of St Vorles. In 1112 or 1113 he entered Cîteaux, and in 1115, in obedience to his abbot, St Stephen Harding, he left it to found Clairvaux, which was to become one of the most famous houses of the Cistercian order. Bernard was its first abbot, ruling over it until his death. Many of his written works were designed for delivery in the chapter house before his own monks. His influence, however, extended far beyond the confines of Clairvaux. He travelled throughout Europe, from Speyer to Palermo and from Madrid to Bordeaux, crossing and recrossing the Alps and the Pyrenees. He made active contributions to synods and councils, notably at Troyes (...

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Michel Huglo

(fl Paris, late 10th and early 11th centuries). French mathematician. According to two late manuscripts used by Gerbert, he compiled a mathematical treatise, Prefacio libri abaci quem junior Bernelinus edidit Parisius ( I-Rvat lat.4539, f.1; see GerbertS, i, Praefatio, no.X; RISM, B/III/2, 1968...

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Lawrence Gushee and Dolores Pesce

(d Reichenau, June 7, 1048). Writer on church music and liturgy, and possibly a composer. He is generally believed to have been of ‘German’ birth from a family of some standing, and was named abbot of Reichenau by Emperor Henry II in 1008...

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See Lantins, de family

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Theodore Karp

(b ?1150–55; d before Aug 1220). French trouvère. Ruins of the castle once occupied by the poet still stand at Berzé-le-Châtel, northwest of Mâcon, in Burgundy. The family, a powerful one, is traceable to the early 1100s; Hugues’ uncle was archdeacon of the abbey of St Vincent. According to Villehardouin, Hugues IV and his father were among those who announced their taking of the cross at Cîteaux on ...

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Kurt von Fischer and Gianluca D’Agostino

(fl 2nd half of the 14th century). Italian composer. His only known works are two two-voice ballatas in F-Pn 6771 (ff.25v–26 and f.26v; ed. in PMFC, x, 1977, p.72): Chi ama ne la lengua (possibly cited in Prudenzani’s Saporetto, sonnet no.33) and ...

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Billart  

David Fallows

(fl ?c1400). French composer. He is known only from the four-voice Marian isorhythmic motet Salve virgo virginum/Vita via veritas/Salve regina in GB-Ob Can.misc.213 (ed. in Van den Borren, no.24). This is a work of exceptional mensural complexity and repeated harsh dissonances in the upper voices, optimistically described by Van den Borren as giving ‘some idea of improvised counterpoint, as it was practised in the fifteenth century’. The top voice has as its text one of the best-known glosses (Chevalier no.18318) on the antiphon used in the tenor. Given the manuscript context and the style of the work, Billart may well be identifiable with Aubert Billard (Albertus Billardi), a clerk and chaplain at Notre Dame, Paris, from ...

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See Picard family

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(d 1141). French ecclesiastic. He was a celebrated scholar who headed the cathedral school at Reims from about 1114 to 1136, when he became Archbishop of Bourges. One polyphonic piece in the Codex Calixtinus ( E-SC ), Ad superni regis decus, is attributed to him. Since an earlier version of this piece appears (late 11th century) in the ‘Saint-Martial’ repertory as ...

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Ian D. Bent

(fl c1261). English singer. One of three Englishmen described by the late 13th-century theorist Anonymus 4 as ‘good singers’ of mensural polyphony, who sang with great refinement (‘valde deliciose’). The theorist referred to him as ‘Blakesmit, at the court of the late King Henry [III]’. He was clerk of the king's chapel in ...