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Article

Colin Timms

(b Rome, c1585; d Rome, Sept 5, 1629). Italian composer. He was brought up in Rome. He was a private pupil of G.B. Nanino from April 1594 and a choirboy at S Luigi dei Francesi from October 1595; by February 1596 he was learning to compose. He left S Luigi in January 1602, after his voice had broken, but returned as an alto in December and remained until May 1603. He is next heard of at the collegiate church of S Maria Maggiore at Spello, where he was maestro di cappella from at least June 1608 (possibly from 1606) to January 1609. He then moved back to Rome and was maestro di cappella of S Maria in Trastevere from September 1609 to March 1610 and of S Maria Maggiore from then to his death. He married in 1616 and had five children. Allegri was one of the first to write independent instrumental accompaniments in vocal chamber music: his ...

Article

Jerome Roche

revised by Noel O’Regan

(b Rome, 1582; d Rome, Feb 7, 1652). Italian composer and singer, brother of Domenico Allegri. From 1591 to 1596 he was a boy chorister and from 1601 to 1604 a tenor at S Luigi dei Francesi, Rome, where the maestro di cappella was G.B. Nanino. According to Allegri’s obituary he studied with G.M. Nanino (see Lionnet). He was active as a singer and composer at the cathedrals of Fermo (1607–21) and Tivoli, and by August 1628 he was maestro di cappella of Santo Spirito in Sassia, Rome. He joined the papal choir as an alto on 6 December 1629, under Urban VIII, and was elected its maestro di cappella for the jubilee year of 1650. In 1640 his fellow singers elected him to revise Palestrina’s hymns (necessitated by Urban VIII’s revision of the texts), which were published in Antwerp in 1644. His contemporaries clearly saw him as a worthy successor to Palestrina and a guardian of the ...

Article

Edmond Strainchamps

(b Florence, Nov 16, 1567; d Florence, July 15, 1648). Italian composer and lutenist. Cesare Tinghi, the Medici court diarist, called him (in Solerti) ‘Lorenzo [or Lorenzino] todesco del liuto’, which has encouraged the notion that he may have been German, but his baptismal record confirms that he was from Florence. He entered the ranks of salaried musicians at the Medici court on 15 April 1604 as a lutenist; during the period 1636–7 he was referred to as maestro di liuto. In January 1622 he was appointed guardaroba della musica, and in due course he was also placed in charge of the pages who played, sang and danced in court entertainments. He continued to serve the court until his death. He seems chiefly to have written instrumental music. Only two vocal pieces by him are known: Tu piangi, a madrigal for solo voice and continuo published in Antonio Brunelli's ...

Article

[Gioseppe, Gioseffo, Josefo, Joseffo, Iseppe]

(b Piacenza or Cremona, 1603/4; d Piacenza, July 18, 1670). Italian composer. The date of his death is usually incorrectly given as 1668. Although little is known of his life, it is certain that the invariable addition to his name of the word ‘Piacenza’ indicates his complete identification with the city where he worked and probably was born (though his inclusion in Giuseppe Bresciani's La virtù ravivata de cremonesi insigni, MS, 1665, see Pontiroli, suggests that he may have been born at Cremona). The first evidence of his reputation in musical circles at Piacenza dates from Carnival 1644, when his ballet Le ninfe del Po, to a text by Bernardo Morando, was performed in the public square of the Cittadella, which was transformed into a theatre on the occasion of the festivities marking the arrival in Piacenza of Francesco I d'Este, Duke of Modena, and his wife. On the basis of the dates and information derived from Allevi's three collections of sacred music, all previous dictionaries have stated that he was ...

Article

Brian Crosby

(bap. Durham, Jan 16, 1670; bur. Lincoln, Feb 11, 1705). English composer and cathedral musician. Allinson was first a chorister (c1682–6) and then a lay-clerk (1689–93) at Durham Cathedral, where his musical ability was nurtured by William Greggs. He was admitted as organist of Lincoln Cathedral on 5 May 1693 and held that position until his death. Parts of five anthems survive, four being represented at both Durham (where one had been transcribed by 1693 and all four by 1699) and Lincoln. Only his full anthem O give thanks unto the Lord is complete. In his verse anthems, two of which lack only their treble part, he displays ability whether writing a declamatory solo or for small groups of voices.

B. Crosby: A Catalogue of Durham Cathedral Music Manuscripts (Oxford, 1986) H.W. Shaw: The Succession of Organists of the Chapel Royal and the Cathedrals of England and Wales from c1538...

Article

Robert Stevenson

(b Lisbon, c1600; d Tomar, March 21, 1660). Portuguese composer. He studied with Duarte Lobo. In 1638 he professed as a friar in the military Order of Christ at the royal monastery at Tomar, where he was mestre de capela. He was elected visitor of his order in ...

Article

Nigel Fortune

(b Senigallia, Aug 17, 1629; d after 1689). Italian composer. In 1654 he was maestro di camera to the papal nuncio to Venice, in 1689 canon and maestro di cappella of Senigallia Cathedral. He published two volumes of motets for small groups. The first (Venice, 1654) consists of 17 pieces for solo voice and continuo distinguished by expansive melodies. The second, ...

Article

Jerome Roche

(b Bologna; fl1628–44). Italian composer. He became a Franciscan friar and a doctor of theology; he was also maestro di cappella of the Cathedral of Sacile, near Udine, and later, in 1628, at the Franciscan friary in Bologna. With several other Italian musicians, he was active in the establishment of Cardinal Franz von Dietrichstein, Prince-Bishop of Olomouc, from 1631 until the cardinal's death in 1636, and in 1637 he wrote the dedication of his Contextus musicarum in Vienna. His output, entirely of church music, is mostly up to date in style and competently written. The masses of 1628 do, however, contain works in the stile antico as well, mellifluous and harmonically unadventurous compared to the music in the then modern manner, which is based more on contrasts. The Coelestis Parnassus, published in the same year, includes two motets with violins, which are used in delicate interplay with tenor voices. Aloisi's expressive technique includes chromaticism, used with telling effect in the third setting of ...

Article

Ingo Schultz

revised by Howard Hotson

(b Ballersbach, nr Herborn, March 1588; d Gyulafehérvár [Weissenburg, Transylvania; [now Alba Julia, Romania], Nov 9, 1638). German theologian, encyclopedist and music theorist. From 1608 he taught at the Calvinist academy, Herborn, where J.A. Komenský was among his pupils. Following the disruptions of the Thirty Years War, he transferred to Gyulafehérvár in Transylvania in 1629–30. His liberal strand of Calvinist thought is reflected in his theological understanding of music: he tolerated secular music (both polyphonic and instrumental) alongside strictly regulated church music as long as it was committed to the spiritual purpose of all music. Classifying music among the mathematical disciplines, he treated it briefly in a series of mathematical textbooks and most extensively in his masterwork, the largest, most comprehensive and systematic encyclopedia assembled to that time (1630). Like that of most of the 37 disciplines handled in the work, his treatment of music is derivative, and its chief importance lies in its comprehensiveness, systematic presentation, wide distribution and easy accessibility within the encyclopedia as a whole. Like Erycius Puteanus and David Mostart, he favoured seven-syllable solmization series (...

Article

Karl-Ernst Bergunder

(b Alach, nr Erfurt, May 27, 1584; d Erfurt, Feb 12, 1640). German composer. He was sent to school at Erfurt in 1590 and went on to study theology at the university there in 1598, gaining the bachelor’s degree in 1599 and the master’s degree in 1603. He taught at Erfurt from 1600, beginning at the Reglerschule; from 1601 he was Kantor at St Andreas and from 1607 was also rector of the school connected with it. He abandoned teaching in 1609 and became a pastor: he worked in the parishes of Ilversgehofen and Marbach, near Erfurt, until 1610 and then moved to Tröchtelborn, near Gotha, where he stayed until 1621 and was probably also Kantor. He published most of his music during these years. He was likened to Orlande de Lassus as an ‘Orlandus Thuringiae’ and he himself was conscious of living at a time of great musical activity: as he wrote in the preface to his ...

Article

Robert Stevenson

(b c1570; d Lisbon, Feb 12, 1643). Basque organist and composer. He had already been in the service of the Spanish crown for some time when on 13 April 1602 he became organist of the royal chapel at Lisbon, with the modest annual salary of 30,000 reis and (from 13 June) three moios of wheat. According to his epitaph he was a keyboard player in the royal chapel for 43 years.

His only surviving works are two tientos ( P-La , in a manuscript appendix to 38-XII-27) which show him to have been a highly skilled composer; the second is a superbly constructed monothematic ricercare and the first a much shorter but highly polished treatment of the Spanish Pange lingua, in which a counterpoint to the plainsong serves throughout as a unifying motif. Two motets were in the library of King João IV, Ave virgo gloriosa for five voices and ...

Article

Colin Timms

(b Bologna, ?1660–70; d after 1719). Italian composer and instrumentalist. He was a pupil of G.P. Colonna and is described in his Cantate a voce sola da camera op.1 (Bologna, 1687; one ed. H. Riemann: Ausgewählte Kammer-Kantaten, Leipzig, [1911]) as a musician in the service of Marquis Guido Rangoni. Alveri also published Arie italiane amorose e lamentabili for solo voice and continuo (Antwerp, 1690), and two operas by him (Il re pastore, overo il Basilio in Arcadia and L'Isione) were performed at the court of Wolfenbüttel in 1691. The libretto of Il re pastore describes him as a ‘virtuoso’ of the duke there and as a member of the Accademia Filarmonica di Bologna. His name appears in a list of instrumentalists who were at Parma Cathedral on 10 August 1719. According to Schmitz, his cantatas are mostly fairly conservative in form although not without interesting features. Seven motets by him survive (...

Article

Lowell Lindgren

[‘Pippo del Violoncello’]

(b Rome, c1665; d London, c1725). Italian cellist and composer. He was mistakenly named ‘Filippo Mattei’ in Mattheson’s Critica musica (January 1723). He played at Rome in concerts and religious functions sponsored by Cardinal Pamphili (1685–1708), the church of S Luigi dei Francesi (1686–1711), Cardinal Ottoboni (1690–99), the Accademia del Disegno di S Luca (1702–11), Prince Ruspoli (1708–11) and the church of S Giacomo degli Spagnoli (1707–13). He joined the musicians’ Accademia di Santo Cecilia on 25 September 1690, was the organist at S Spirito in 1694 and a trombonist in the Concerto del Campidoglio beginning in 1702. He is called ‘Roman’ in the libretto for his oratorio Aman delusus (1699) and that of La stella de’ magi (1702) identifies him as a ‘virtuoso’ of Cardinal Ottoboni. He served as ...

Article

Jerome Roche

revised by Elizabeth Roche

(fl 1614–15). Italian composer. The title-pages of his two collections of Motecta (Venice, 1614–15) do not indicate whether he held a post; their respective dedications to the Bishop of Cortone and a Neapolitan dignitary suggest that though publishing in Venice, he was not necessarily working in northern Italy. They contain motets for one to six voices with organ continuo; it can thus be seen that he adopted the up-to-date concertato style and was also interested in the modern art of the solo motet....

Article

Hans Joachim Marx

(b c1670; d after 1730). Italian composer. He is not to be confused with Giovanni Tedeschi, ‘detto Amadori’ (d c1780). Giuseppe Amadori was active in Rome between 1690 and 1709. In 1690 he was in the service of Cardinal Pietro Ottoboni as organist and harpsichordist. His oratorio Il martirio di S Adriano was performed in the Chiesa Nuova in 1702, and in 1707 and 1709 he was active in the Accademia del Disegno. An autograph Pange lingua for soprano and continuo and an aria with instrumental accompaniment are in the St Sulpitiuskerk, Diest (according to Eitner); two manuscript arias for soprano and continuo are in the Schlosskirche at Sondershausen and the Giuseppe Verdi Conservatory, Milan, and a cantata and other church music are in the Santini Collection ( D-MÜp ). Instrumental movements by him are included in two anthologies published in London, A Second Collection of Toccatas, Vollentarys and Fugues...

Article

Walter Blankenburg

Countess of Erbach (b Arolsen, Aug 8, 1640; d Cuylenburg [now Culemborg], Jan 4, 1697). German poet and composer. She was the daughter of Count Philipp Theodor von Waldeck; her mother was born Countess of Nassau. She appears to have spent her youth at Arolsen, the seat of the Waldeck family. In 1664 she married Count Georg Ludwig von Erbach, and then settled at Michelstadt, near Erbach, Odenwald. She was typical of the numerous princesses of the years around 1700 who inclined to Pietism and gave expression to it in verse. She published Andächtige Sing-Lust, das ist i. Morgen-, ii. Abend-, iii. Tage-, iv. Beth-, v. Buss-, vi. Klag- und Trost-, vii. Lob- und Dank-, viii. Lehrlieder (Hildburghausen, 1692). The place of publication is explained by its being the residence of one of her sisters, who was the wife of the Duke Ernst of Saxe-Hildburghausen and to whom she dedicated her book. It is therefore possible that it was written under Middle German influence. Moreover, the Princesses of Reuss and Schwarzburg, who lived nearby, were ardent disciples of Pietism. Amalia Catharina's publication is a collection of songs for household devotion. It contains 67 poems, some of which are provided with melodies with figured bass. This music (which is not given by Zahn) is certainly by Amalia Catharina herself and is an important contribution to the development of the German sacred continuo song....

Article

Craig H. Russell

revised by Monica Hall

[Carles y Amat, Joan]

(b Monistrol de Montserrat, c1572; d Monistrol de Montserrat, Feb 10, 1642). Catalan theorist, guitarist and physician. Biographical information about Amat is drawn mainly from research carried out in 1918 by José Vilar (Revista Ilustrada Jorba, 1925, and Pujol, 1950). Although baptismal records are missing, Vilar placed Amat’s birth at around 1572, and this date is confirmed by a letter included in some editions of Amat’s treatise, which states that Amat was 67 in 1639. Amat himself said that he was born in Monistrol, naming his parents as Joan Carles and Joanna Amat. Amat received the doctorate in medicine at the University of Valencia, probably in 1595, and may have spent some time in Lérida. In 1600 he married Mónica Ubach Casanovas; they had no children. He was made municipal physician at Monistrol in 1618, performed a similar function at the nearby monastery of Montserrat, and occupied several other municipal offices. At the time of his death he had just started a period as mayor....

Article

Laurence Libin

[Marchioni, Nicolo ]

(fl Bologna, Italy 1662–1752). Italian violin maker. He had no connection with the Cremonese Amati family, but is sometimes said to have been a pupil of Giovanni Guidanti; this has not been substantiated. He entered the priesthood in 1687 and apparently set up a workshop about 1718, the date of his earliest known label. His instruments, in some respects influenced by Guidanti’s teacher Tononi, are conservative in method and inconsistent in style, for example in the varied placement of their soundholes. Dom Nicolo’s fairly prolific workshop doubtless employed several assistants, most likely his brother and nephews, but the idiosyncratic carving of the scrolls and placement of large position pins appear characteristic of his hand. The best of his violins, while not equal to the finest Italian craftsmanship, are of high quality....

Article

Paolo Emilio Carapezza and Giuseppe Collisani

(b Ciminna, nr Palermo, Jan 5, 1629; d Palermo, July 29, 1670). Italian composer. His family were connected with the princely houses of Ventimiglia and Gambacurta. His younger brother Paolo, author of Teatro marmoreo della marina (Palermo, 1682), was one of the greatest Italian architects. His sister or cousin Eleonora was the mother of Alessandro Scarlatti; deputizing for the parish priest of S Antonio Abate, Palermo, Amato personally baptized her daughters. He spent his life at Palermo. Entering the Seminario dei Chierici in adolescence, he obtained a degree in theology and took holy orders. From 1652 he directed music at the church of S Maria del Carmine and from 1665 until his death he was maestro di cappella at the cathedral. He was commissioned by S Maria del Carmine to compose two Passions (one according to St Matthew, the other according to St John). These are not oratorio Passions but liturgical works; recitatives and ...

Article

Denise Launay

revised by James R. Anthony

(b Burgundy, late 16th century; d Rouen, July 6, 1637). French composer. All that is known of his life is that in 1626 he was procureur of the Compagnie de Jésus at Rouen. He left only musical works, from which we may infer that he was director of music of one of the colleges of his order. His Octonarium sacrum (1634) is a set of five-part verses for the Magnificat, using all eight tones; they are fugal and closely resemble similar pieces by Formé. Two years later he published his Harmonia sacra in two complementary volumes for four and six voices respectively. It includes works for double choir in a distinctly modern style originating in Italy that had already been adopted in France by several composers, Du Caurroy and Le Jeune notable among them; each volume also contains several masses and motets for a single choir. The double-choir works are for liturgical use and comprise psalms, motets and hymns. In his preface d'Ambleville states that they may be performed according to the forces available, for example by two groups – one of four soloists, the other a six-part chorus – by a soprano and bass duet from each choir or by a solo soprano, the missing voices being replaced by instruments or, failing them, by organ alone. He normally wrote either in fauxbourdon style (which he also called ‘musica simplex’) or contrapuntally, including fugal textures (‘musica figurata’), which he handled skilfully. Apart from these Latin works he was also, according to Gastoué (p.264), the composer of the music published in ...