61-80 of 86 results  for:

  • Jewish Music x
  • Composer or Arranger x
Clear all

Article

(b Balassagyarmat, 1789; d Pest, Jan 23, 1848). Hungarian composer and violinist. The son of a poor Jewish tradesman named Rosenthal, he began studying the violin at the age of eight. After a time in Nyitra (now Nitra, Slovakia) and Pozsony (now Bratislava) he went to Prague, where he studied both music and calligraphy. In 1808 he moved to Pest, first working as a bookkeeper for a wholesaler. In the same year he gave a violin recital there, playing works by Kreutzer and compositions of his own in the Hungarian style; after this concert he decided to devote himself exclusively to music. In 1809 he joined the second Hungarian theatrical company in Pest as a violinist, later becoming its musical director; on 12 April 1812 this company performed the play Angyal Bandi with his music. He lived in Baja from 1813 to 1819, when a fire destroyed all his possessions, including his manuscripts. From ...

Article

William Y. Elias

[Karl ]

(b Heidelberg, Nov 13, 1897; d Beit Zayit, nr Jerusalem, Jan 15, 1974). Israeli composer and conductor of German birth . A pupil of Richard Strauss at the Berlin Academy of Arts, he became a répétiteur at the Berlin Staatsoper, sang at the Hamburg Opera and conducted in Baden-Baden. After settling in Jerusalem in 1933, he became the first music director of the Jerusalem Broadcasting Service in 1936. In 1938 he founded the Israel Radio SO (now Jerusalem SO), and from 1957 to 1962 he was director of the Israel Broadcasting Authority’s Transcription Service. In Germany he was active in reviving Handel’s Rodelinda and in 1944 he organized the first Bach and Handel festival in Jerusalem.

On his arrival in Israel, Salmon became influenced by the folk music of the region, which resulted in such works as the Symphonic Suite on Greek Themes (1943) and the Sephardic Suite...

Article

Michal Ben-Zur

[Kar’el]

(b Heidelberg, Nov 13, 1897; d Jerusalem, Jan 15, 1974). Israeli composer, conductor, singer and keyboard player of German birth. He studied the organ with Philipp Wofrum and composition with Richard Strauss. From 1920 to 1926 he held the position of conductor at the Hamburg Neues Stadt-Theater, and from 1931 to 1932 was baritone and stage director at the Deutsche Musikbühne. He emigrated to Palestine in 1933, where he was appointed programme director of the newly founded Palestine Broadcasting Service (PBS, later Kol Israel [‘The Voice of Israel’]), a position he held until his retirement in 1962; he founded the PBS Orchestra (later the Kol Israel Orchestra) in 1938.

Many of Salomon’s early works were destroyed. His music from 1933 is tonal with modal inflections, combining European traditions with folk influences to create a light, accessible style. The Sepharadic Suite (1961) incorporates Spanish melodies; popular material is also used in the Second Symphony ‘Leilot be’Cna’an (‘Nights of Canaan’, ...

Article

Nathan Broder

revised by Barbara A. Renton

(b Vale-Hotzulovo, nr Odessa, Ukraine, Nov 8, 1882; d Port Chester, NY, June 30, 1959). American composer, conductor and writer on music of Russian origin. He studied mathematics and philosophy at St Petersburg University (1906–9) and composition and conducting with Lyadov and Rimsky-Korsakov at the conservatories of St Petersburg and Moscow (1906–10). In 1908 he and some other St Petersburg Conservatory students founded the Society for Jewish Folk Music, and in 1913 he took part in the Baron de Guinzburg Ethnological Expedition to collect religious chants of the Transcaucasian Jews. He was active as a conductor in Tbilisi, Paris and London between 1915 and 1920, and in 1917–18 he directed the Tbilisi Conservatory. In 1920 he settled in New York, where he was a founder of the League of Composers (1923) and one of its directors for two decades. He was also music director of Temple Emanu-El, New York (...

Article

Anthony Philip Pattin

(b Detroit, Jan 24, 1947). American composer and pianist, active in Israel. He studied at Converse College (Spartanburg, South Carolina), Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Arizona (DMA 1970). His principal teachers include Ozan Marsh and Rudolf Serkin (piano), and Robert Muczynski (composition). Although he has composed for virtually all media, he has shown a special affinity for solo piano works and chamber music with piano. His brilliant piano writing often requires enormous technical facility on the part of the performer; textures are invariably contrapuntal, regardless of tempo, and rhythms are vital and varied with frequent changes of metre. His works often evoke a frenzied state through climaxes, rapid harmonic motion and breakneck speed. He has remarked that his ‘is not the kind of music to relax to, but the kind that makes people sweat; not only performer, but audience'. His interest in folk music stems largely from his desire to explore his own Jewish roots....

Article

Catherine Parsons Smith

(b Hamburg, June 27, 1924; d Scarsdale, NY, July 11, 2006). American composer and pianist of German origin. She studied at the Sternsches Konservatorium, Berlin, from the age of five until her expulsion in 1935. On her family’s emigration to Sweden in 1938, she was admitted to the Swedish Royal Academy of Music in Stockholm, despite restrictions on Jewish refugees, studying composition (with Ingemar Liljefors) and piano there until early 1941. The family then travelled to Mexico City, via the USSR, where Schonthal studied composition with Rodolfo Halffter and Manuel Ponce, and piano with Pablo Castellanos. She gave an acclaimed performance of her own piano concerto in Mexico City, and in 1946, after Hindemith heard her playing her own works, she entered Yale University on his recommendation (AB, composition, 1948).

Virtually all of Schonthal’s study and much of her subsequent compositional career took place in situations of exile and in relative isolation from other composers and creative artists. To support herself and her family she played the piano in bars and wrote popular songs and music for TV commercials, and from ...

Article

Christopher Hailey

(August Julius)

(b Monaco, March 23, 1878; d Berlin, March 21, 1934). Austrian composer, teacher, conductor and administrator. He is a central figure in that remarkable flowering of opera in Austria that included the works of Zemlinsky, Berg and Korngold. Integrating his aesthetic plurality (a mixture of Romanticism, naturalism, symbolism, Impressionism, Expressionism and Neue Sachlichkeit), timbral experimentation, strategies of extended tonality and conception of total music theatre into the narrative of 20th-century music has contributed to a more differentiated understanding of central European modernism.

Schreker was the oldest of four surviving children born to Ignaz Schrecker, a court photographer of Jewish birth, and Eleonore von Clossmann, a member of the Catholic aristocracy of eastern Styria. Ignaz Schrecker’s restless travels took him and his family from Vienna to Monaco, Spa, Brussels, Paris, Trieste and Pola before he settled at last in Linz in 1882. After his death in 1888 the family moved to Vienna, where in ...

Article

Nico Schüler

[Hans]

(b Rostock, July 4, 1896; d Berlin, Oct 16, 1987). German composer and viola player. He studied composition and musicology in Freiburg, where his teachers included Julius Weismann and Willibald Gurlitt. After serving as solo viola player at the Düsseldorf Schauspielhaus (1924–5), he played in a number of orchestras in Berlin. He attracted considerable attention during the early 1930s as a member of the Harlan-Trio (other members included his wife, the musicologist Cornelia Schröder (née Auerbach), and instrument maker Peter Harlan), an ensemble that performed medieval and Renaissance music on historical instruments. In 1935, because of his wife’s Jewish heritage and his connections with the workers’ music movement, Schröder was excluded from the Reichsmusikkammer. Although special permission allowed him to work as a violist at a Berlin theatre, his political difficulties continued after 1945, as he worked in East and lived in West Berlin. In 1965...

Article

Israel J. Katz

[Aladar]

(b Budapest, Feb 29, 1884; d Los Angeles, March 3, 1976). Hungarian-American opera conductor, composer and musicologist. He studied at the university and at the academy in Budapest (1901–5), his teachers including Driesch (philosophy) and Koessler (composition). Thereafter he worked as an opera conductor in Cologne (1905–7), Mülhausen (1907–9), Brno (1908–11), Philadelphia and Chicago (1911–12), Hamburg (1912–13), New York (Century Company, 1913–14), Berlin-Charlottenburg (1914–16), Vienna (Volksoper, 1916–18) and Leipzig (1918–24). He remained in Leipzig as conductor of the Leipzig SO (1924–32) and as a student of musicology at the university (1930–32), where he took the doctorate. In 1932 he was music director of central German radio, Berlin, and taught at the Klindworth-Scharwenka Conservatory. He began to collect materials for a history of Jewish music, but this work had to be continued in Paris, where he was a radio programme director (...

Article

Ronit Seter

(b Montevideo, Jan 1, 1959). Israeli composer and guitarist of Uruguayan birth. After emigrating to Israel in 1974, he studied the classical guitar with Menashe Baquiche and composition with Jan Radzynski. He obtained the BMus (1984) and MM (1986) at the Rubin Academy of Music, Tel-Aviv University, where his teachers included Leon Schidlowsky and Seter. He began to teach at the Rubin Academy in 1995. One of the foremost guitarists in Israel, his honours include two ACUM prizes (1992) and the Prime Minister Prize for composers (1994). As a composer, Seroussi has drawn inspiration from a variety of sources, including Luis Buñuel's films, Henri Matisse's paintings and the poetry of Pablo Neruda and Antonio Machado. His style, influenced by European avant-garde pitch content and Latin American orchestration, tends towards new complexity. His orchestral composition Lux: in memoriam Mordecai Seter (...

Article

Steven Johnson

(b Philadelphia, March 12, 1921; d Chicago, June 13, 2002). American composer and conductor. Raised in Philadelphia by Russian Jewish immigrant parents, he studied the violin with Emmanuel Zetlin (1937–42) and composition with Stefan Wolpe (from 1938). At the age of 16 he was selected as the youth conductor of the Philadelphia Youth Orchestra. He graduated from public high school in 1939, but received no other formal education. During the early 1950s he taught at the Third Street Settlement Music School, New York and from 1956 to 1959 worked at the MacDowell Colony. At the invitation of Rochberg, he accepted a part-time position at the University of Pennsylvania in 1963. The following year he joined the composition department at the University of Chicago, a position he retained until his retirement in 1992. He also founded and directed Chicago University’s Contemporary Chamber Players and guest conducted such ensembles as the Chicago SO and the London Sinfonietta....

Article

Ronit Seter

[Arik]

(b Kibbutz Affikim, nr Tiberias, Nov 29, 1943). Israeli composer. He studied with two of the most influential Israeli composers at that time, Oedoen Partos and Mordecai Seter, at the Rubin Academy at Tel-Aviv University (BM 1968), but did not follow either stylistically. He turned instead to an extreme, politically motivated avant-garde style, influenced by Webern, Stockhausen, minimalism and the electro-acoustic music of the 1960s and 70s, an artistic direction which has led to his marginalization in Israel. A composer mainly of electro-acoustic music, Shapira is also an established private composition teacher. He was awarded the Prime Minister’s Prize for Composers (1986), and, more controversially, the Israel Prize (1994), only the fifth such award to an Israeli composer in 40 years. He started teaching part time at the Open University, Tel-Aviv, in 1986 and at the Rubin Academy, Tel-Aviv, from 1990 to 1995...

Article

Natan Shahar

(b Kherson, 13/Jan 26, 1901; d Afiquim, June 22, 1979). Israeli composer and violinist of Russian birth . He emigrated to Palestine with his family at the age of five. After studying at the Shulamit Conservatory in Tel-Aviv with Hopenko and Karchevski, he joined the ‘Ein Ḥarod Kibbutz, where he formed the Valley Quartet. In 1926 he moved to the Yagur Kibbutz. During 1929–30 he studied choral singing with F. Jöde in Germany. Upon his return to the kibbutz, he wrote many songs on texts by Rachel Blovshtain (1890–1931) and Chaim Nachman Bialik, as well as on versicles from the Bible and prayer books. In addition to songs marking the Israeli agricultural tradition, he wrote sermons for Jewish festivals, the most famous of which is a version of the Passover legend. Sharet's best-known works are the eight Anot collections (1937–9) which predominantly contain new Israeli songs. The final part of the collection includes 80 European choral songs, many of which were reset to Hebrew texts....

Article

Miri Gerstel

(b Tel-Aviv, Jan 7, 1935). Israeli composer and conductor. He studied philosophy at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem (1955–9). He started his musical training with Ze'ev Priel (conducting and piano), Horst Salomon (horn) and Paul Ben Haim (composition, 1949–57). He attended a conducting course with Markevitch in Salzburg (1955) and studied composition with Blacher at the Berlin Musikhochschule (1959–62). From 1972 to 1982 he was music director of the Kibbutz Chamber Orchestra. He taught at the Cologne Musikhochschule (1983–6) and was music advisor to the Israel Festival (1985–8). He was music director of the newly founded Israel SO from 1989 to 95, during which time he became the first Israeli conductor to include works by Richard Strauss in public concerts. He taught conducting and composition at the Rubin Academy in Jerusalem (1986–9) and from 1990 taught at the Rubin Academy in Tel-Aviv (director from ...

Article

Michal Ben-Zur

(b Kremenchug, Jan 22, 1905; d Tel-Aviv, Feb 20, 1990). Israeli composer and pianist of Ukrainian birth. While a student at the Berlin Hochschule für Musik, she studied the piano with Egon Petri and Artur Schnabel. She first travelled to Palestine in 1929, but decided to settle in Paris where she made contact with Arthur Honegger and Darius Milhaud, and studied composition with Nadia Boulanger, Edgard Varèse and Max Deutsch (1930–32). Her First Symphony (1935), originally scored for piano, was orchestrated in 1937 while she was participating in a course given by Enescu. After the German invasion of France, Shlonsky escaped to London, where she wrote her Piano Concerto in Two Movements (1942–4). She emigrated to Palestine in 1945. Considered an avant-garde composer, she found it difficult initially to have her works performed. As well as teaching the piano at Tel-Aviv University, she served as a music critic for several Israeli newspapers....

Article

William Y. Elias

(b Prague, Aug 6, 1908; d Tel-Aviv, Sept 30, 1980). Israeli conductor, composer and pianist of Czech birth. At the Prague Music Academy (1924–6) he studied the piano with Franz Langer and Ervin Schulhoff, and composition with Zemlinsky, winning a piano competition there in 1925. His début as an opera conductor was in 1926 at the Neues Deutsches Theater, Prague, with Kienzl’s Der Evangelimann. He conducted there until 1930, when he went to Hamburg to conduct the Staatsoper. In 1934 he returned to Prague, where he gave the first radio performance of the concert version of Dvořák’s first opera, Alfred. In 1939 he settled in Palestine and in December that year he first conducted the Palestine SO; he later became permanent guest conductor of this orchestra, and also of the Israel Broadcasting SO, the Israel Chamber Orchestra and the Haifa SO. He was among the founders in ...

Article

Robyn Holmes, Peter Campbell and Judith Crispin

[Lazarus]

Robyn Holmes and Peter Campbell, revised by Judith Crispin

(b Tianjin, China, Sept 10, 1934). Australian composer, pianist, and musicologist. Born to Russian-Chinese parents, he emigrated to Australia with his family in 1951. He studied the piano at the NSW Conservatorium of Music, Sydney, where his teachers included Winifred Burston (1952–8), and in San Francisco with Egon Petri (1959–61). On his return to Australia, he taught at the Queensland Conservatorium (1961–5) and lectured on contemporary composition at the University of Queensland. In 1965 he assumed the position of Head of Keyboard at the newly founded Canberra School of Music (now part of the Australian National University), where he became Head of Composition and Head of Academic Studies in 1978, and Professor Emeritus and Distinguished Visiting Fellow in 2005.

Sitsky first came to prominence as a composer at the inaugural Australian Composers’ Seminar (Hobart, Tasmania, ...

Article

Roksanda Pejović

(b Sombor, 1794; d Belgrade, 1870). Serbian composer and conductor of Jewish origin. He taught music in Šabac and held a conducting post in Novi Sad. Invited in 1831 to the court of Prince Miloš Obrenović, he founded and directed the prince’s Serbian Orchestra, which played in his Serbian Theatre in Kragujevac and Belgrade. In 1840 he moved with the court to Belgrade, where he was active until 1864. He was the outstanding figure of early Serbian stage life and composed and arranged music for several plays, containing overtures and vocal and instrumental numbers: many of the songs were influenced by Serbian or oriental folktunes and achieved wide popularity. Owing to its musical richness Ženidba cara Dušana (‘The Marriage of Tsar Dušan’; 1840, Kragujevac) is regarded as an opera, although Šlezinger conceived the music to accompany Atanasije Nikolić’s play.

S. Ðurić-Klajn: ‘Razvoj muzičke umetnosti u Srbiji’ [The Development of the Art of Music in Serbia], in ...

Article

William Y. Elias

(Wolfgang)

(b Düsseldorf, Nov 27, 1918). Israeli composer and violist. He began to play the violin and to compose at an early age; during the years 1932–5 he wrote several works indebted to Reger, an influence which remained perceptible. In 1933 he studied under Eldering at the Cologne Academy, and in 1934 he settled in Palestine, where his studies were completed under Partos (1940–42). Steinberg joined the Palestine SO (later the Israel PO) as a violist in 1942; he has also appeared as a soloist and frequently as a chamber musician (he was a founder of the New Israel Quartet in 1957). From 1969 to 1972 he lectured on chamber music at the Tel-Aviv Academy. The Viola Sonata (1949) showed a first interest in Schoenbergian 12-note serialism, which came to dominate his work. (CohenWE)

Article

Michael Steinberg

[Eduard]

(b Sambor, June 18, 1892; d New York, Nov 11, 1964). American pianist and composer of Polish birth. His education as a pianist was with Vilém Kurz (Lemberg) and Busoni (Berlin). He was to have studied composition with Humperdinck, but was so shocked when asked whether he wanted to compose in the Brahmsian or the Wagnerian manner that he never went back. Busoni, therefore, sent him to Schoenberg. In 1912 he took part in the first performance of Pierrot lunaire, and he played in the premières of most of Schoenberg's later works. He was the pianist for the Verein für Musikalische Privataufführungen, founded in 1918 by Schoenberg, and introduced works by Skryabin and much new French music to Vienna. During his Viennese years (he emigrated to the USA in 1938), he was often the pianist for Karl Kraus’s readings and recitations. In 1952 the ISCM gave him its highest award, the Schoenberg medal....